The Dirty Worm Story

The Dirty Worm Story

Overview coming soon.

A Silly Worm Story

A Silly Worm Story

This story is about six silly worms who meet each other as they are forced to come out of the rain soaked ground. Their names are silly because in real life worms are neither male nor female which is the reason for the silly names. They are Neether, Nyther, Eether, Eyther, Nothin, and Whatever. Find out why they all popped back into the ground at the end of the story.

Apples, Pumpkins, and Harvest

Ready-to-go Activities, Games, Literature Selections, Poetry, and Everything You Need for a Complete Theme Unit

Apples, Pumpkins, and Harvest

Celebrate the autumn season in the classroom with fresh bulletin board ideas, learning centers, poetry, easy science projects, no-cook recipes, hands-on math activities, reproducibles, and more.

There's a Hair in My Dirt!

A Worm's Story

There's a Hair in My Dirt!

Gary Larson writes: Our story begins with a family of worms who are having dinner one fine evening and Son Worm is unhappy. Unhappy because he's found a hair in his plate of dirt. It's the proverbial straw and it leads him to bemoan his fate as a worm - he's sick and tired of being a worm, tired of being at the bottom of the food chain. His father, upset by his outburst, decides to tell him the tale of a fair human maiden called Harriet. Even with the wonder of satellite television, Harriet loved the Great Outdoors and took many wondrous walks along her favourite woodland trail, adventures filled with mystery and magic. Unfortunately, although Harriet was fair and kindhearted (to a very dangerous degree) she was also, well, dumb. She didn't quite understand what she was seeing, didn't realise that in Nature, what you see is not necessarily what you get ...

Worm Work

Recasting Romanticism

Worm Work

Worms. Natural history is riddled with them. Literature is crawling with them. From antiquity to today, the ubiquitous and multiform worm provokes an immediate discomfort and unconscious distancing: it remains us against them in anthropocentric anxiety. So there is always something muddled, or dirty, or even offensive when talking about worms. Rehabilitating the lowly worm into a powerful aesthetic trope, Janelle A. Schwartz proposes a new framework for understanding such a strangely animate nature. Worms, she declares, are the very matter with which the Romantics rethought the relationship between a material world in constant flux and the human mind working to understand it. Worm Work studies the lesser-known natural historical records of Abraham Trembley and his contemporaries and the familiar works of Erasmus Darwin, Charles Darwin, William Blake, Mary Shelley, and John Keats, to expose the worm as an organism that is not only reviled as a taxonomic terror but revered as a sign of great order in nature as well as narrative. This book traces a pattern of cultural production, a vermiculture that is as transformative of matter as it is of mind. It distinguishes decay or division as positive processes in Romantic era writings, compounded by generation or renewal and used to represent the biocentric, complex structuring of organicism. Offering the worm as an archetypal figure through which to recast the evolution of a literary order alongside questions of taxonomy from 1740 to 1820 and on, Schwartz unearths Romanticism as a rich humus of natural historical investigation and literary creation.

Worm Story

Worm Story

Who likes stomach acid and sludge farming and wants to find a friend? Wilton the worm.Who likes running away and hiding and wants to save the world? Algy the microbe.What's huge and scary and the first thing they see outside? Underpants. The hilarious tale of two tiny parasites and their very big adventure.

Early Birdy Gets the Worm (Picture Reader)

Picture Reader

Early Birdy Gets the Worm (Picture Reader)

This Story is Told in Pictures... so children 3 to 6 can “read” the pictures and enjoy the story. Waking up early one morning, Early Birdy watches Mother Birdy catch a worm. Inspired, Early Birdy wants to catch one too. But catching a worm isn’t as easy as it looks. Join Early Birdy on an exciting and funny adventure set in a beautiful springtime forest environment. For the free User’s Guide for Parents and Teachers that outlines how to use this Picture Reader to stimulate a child’s imagination, visual awareness and story-telling skills, go to: MeadowbrookPress.com/PictureReading

More Rocco Stories

More Rocco Stories

More Rocco Stories is a follow-up of Rocco Stories, published in 2000. It is a collection of short stories, anecdotes and some whimsical tales about life. This version includes some selected satirical Fables.