Working Class Represent

Working Class Represent

In her third collection of poetry, Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz celebrates the ups and downs of being a poet with a day job. Whether exulting the mundaneness of office life ("Rules of Slack"), musing about hidden perks of college poetry gigs ("Ode to College Cafeterias") or hilariously defending the use of humor in poetry ("To the Guy Who Said that Funny Poetry Ain't Poetry"), this book continues Aptowicz's tradition of witty, honest and idiosyncratic work. Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz's poems about her working class roots are so entertaining, so poignant, so perfectly incisive, that I almost wish I didn't have a trust fund! - Taylor Mali, The Last Time As We Are ...Cristin's voice is authentically hers. Cristin is better than any robot that vacuums your floor, better than any natural or artificial sweetener. She is better than most tables, which tend to wobble after a while. -John S. Hall, author/musician King Missile

Working-class Suburb

A Study of Auto Workers in Suburbia

Working-class Suburb


Gospels and Grit

Work and Labour in Carlyle, Conrad and Orwell

Gospels and Grit

Examines the literary representations of work and labour in the Victorian works of Carlyle, and the 20th century writings of Conrad and Orwell.

Working-class Formation

Nineteenth-century Patterns in Western Europe and the United States

Working-class Formation

Applying an original theoretical framework, an international group of historians and social scientists here explores how class, rather than other social bonds, became central to the ideologies, dispositions, and actions of working people, and how this process was translated into diverse institutional legacies and political outcomes. Focusing principally on France. Germany, and the United States, the contributors examine the historically contingent connections between class, as objectively structured and experienced, and collective perceptions and responses as they develop in work, community, and politics. Following Ira Katznelson's introduction of the analytical concepts, William H. Sewell, Jr., Michelle Perrot, and Alain Cottereau discuss France; Amy Bridges and Martin Shefter, the United States; and Jargen Kocka and Mary Nolan, Germany. The conclusion by Aristide R. Zolberg comments on working-class formation up to World War I, including developments in Great Britain, and challenges conventional wisdom about class and politics in the industrializing West.

The Reading Lesson

The Threat of Mass Literacy in Nineteenth Century British Fiction

The Reading Lesson

"[Brantlinger's] writing is admirably lucid, his knowledge impressive and his thesis a welcome reminder of the class bias that so often accompanies denunciations of popular fiction." --Publishers Weekly "Brantlinger is adept at discussing both the fiction itself and the social environment in which that fiction was produced and disseminated. He brings to his study a thorough knowledge of traditional and contemporary scholarship, which results in an important scholarly book on Victorian fiction and its production." --Choice "Timely, scrupulously researched, thoroughly enlightening, and steadily readable. . . . A work of agenda-setting historical scholarship." --Garrett Stewart Fear of mass literacy stalks the pages of Patrick Brantlinger's latest book. Its central plot involves the many ways in which novels and novel reading were viewed--especially by novelists themselves--as both causes and symptoms of rotting minds and moral decay among nineteenth-century readers.

Women and Modernity in Weimar Germany

Reality and Its Representation in Popular Fiction

Women and Modernity in Weimar Germany

This book focuses on the popular fiction of Weimar Germany and explores the relationship between women, the texts they read, and the society in which they lived. A complex picture emerges that shows women talking center stage, not only in the fiction but also in the reality that shaped its fictional representations. One of the author's significant conclusions is that it was the growing strength of female subjectivity, its strong positioning, and its insistent claim to visibility that occupied the imaginations and fears of Weimar culture and contributed in an important way to the crisis that afflicted the Weimar Republic.

Evolution and Eugenics in American Literature and Culture, 1880-1940

Essays on Ideological Conflict and Complicity

Evolution and Eugenics in American Literature and Culture, 1880-1940

Charles Darwin's theory of descent suggested that man is trapped by biological determinism and environment, which requires the fittest specimens to struggle and adapt without benefit of God in order to survive. Tthis volume focusses on how American literature appropriated and aesthetically transformed this, and related, theories.

Women Without Class

Girls, Race, and Identity

Women Without Class

"Pathbreaking and original. Bettie's comparative analysis of race, class, and gender performance is unparalleled in current scholarship."--Angela Valenzuela, author of Subtractive Schooling: U.S.-Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring "What a wonderful book! It deserves to be placed next to Paul Willis' Learning to Labour--or in front of it. Bettie seamlessly weaves bold theoretical arguments together with a nuanced portrayal of senior high school girls, Anglo and Mexican, working-class and middle-class--or in their words, the preps, hicks, smokers/rockers/trash and the Mexican preps, cholas/cholos, hard-cores, and las chicas. Her book is equally a challenge to feminists who can see only gender, and theorists of class and race who cannot see gender at all. It is one of the finest empirical and conceptual discussions of how gender, race, and class intersect. It is also a page-turner, lucidly and often movingly written."--Elizabeth Long, author of From Sociology to Cultural Studies: New Perspectives "Julie Bettie has written an extraordinary book. Engagingly written, empathetic, and filled with insight, Women Without Class makes a clear and convincing case that essentialized concepts of race and gender are not only inaccurate, but even worse, part of the ideological structure that renders class invisible. Bettie's book sets a new standard of excellence for studies of schooling and social identities."--George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "In this fresh and realistic book, Julie Bettie tells us uncomfortable, but important truths about the lives of young women in an American high school. Within the kaleidoscope of gender and ethnic identities are injuries, exclusions, and the powerful (though often hidden) effects of class. This is a book to be read by everyone who wants to understand contemporary youth."--R.W. Connell, author of Gender and Power: Society, the Person, and Sexual Politics "Women Without Class is an important contribution to scholarship on young women and the intersections of race and class with gender. The book is fantastically rich in observation and analysis. The author resists with vigor a victimology perspective, but at the same time shows how the marginalization of class from contemporary work in the field results in a failure to understand how assumptions about post-feminism, female success, and social mobility produce new and virulent exclusions."--Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths College London and author of Feminism and Youth Culture "Bettie is doing something no one has done before: she explores the many ways that BOTH Mexican American and White adolescent girls interpret and enact racially gendered class identities. This book is essential reading for any serious scholar of gender, class, and race-ethnicity."--Denise Segura, Professor of Sociology, University of California-Santa Barbara "Rather than following traditional and stereotypical notions common in mainstream U.S. sociology and criminology, which portray youth as delinquent and criminals, Bettie gives the reader the vivid representations of a group of working-class youth who are searching for 'creative responses to the injuries of inequality.'"--Esther Madriz, author of Nothing Bad Happens to Good Girls: Fear of Crime in Women's Lives