Women Nobel Peace Prize Winners, 2d ed.

Women Nobel Peace Prize Winners, 2d ed.

Reviews of the first edition: "Extensive biography...of value to anyone researching [these women], their backgrounds, and their contributions to peace in the twentieth century."--ARBA "[The authors] are to be applauded for their research and their dedication."--Spartanburg Herald-Journal From the first woman Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Bertha von Suttner (1905), to the latest and youngest female Nobel laureate, Malala Yousafzai (2014), this book in its second edition provides a detailed look at the lives and accomplishments of each of these sixteen Prize winners. They did not expect recognition or fame for their work--economist Emily Greene Balch (1946) was surprised to learn that anyone knew about her. But they did not work in isolation: all met with discouragement, derision, threats or--in Yousafazi's case--attempted murder and exile. A history of the Prize and a biographical sketch of Alfred Nobel are included.

Champions for Peace

Women Winners of the Nobel Peace Prize

Champions for Peace

Since it was first awarded in 1901, only twelve women have won the Nobel Prize for Peace. They hail from all over the world, including the United States, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Central America. Engaged and inspiring, these women clearly demonstrate that there is something each of us can do to advance a just, positive peace. Whether they began by insisting on garbage collection or simply by planting a tree, each understood that peace must be global in order to be sustained. All learned that peace is not always popular, but believed they must persevere. All are truly champions for peace.

Dangerous Women

The Rhetoric of the Women Nobel Peace Laureates

Dangerous Women

Most of us are familiar with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's now famous adage, 'Well behaved women rarely make history.' This book explores eleven remarkable women who were deemed 'dangerous' in their respective places and times for taking on a revolutionary idea: that peace is possible by working for justice. For courageous, history-making women to make headway in what are often male-dominated societies, women frequently become masters of the art of persuasion. This book explores the rhetoric, that is, the persuasive communication strategies and tactics used for peacebuilding and social justice, of the eleven women Nobel Peace prize winners since the inception of this internationally renowned award. Their inspiring stories and their bravery, even in the face of death threats, emphasize how saying the right thing at the right time can be both life saving and can make violent, dictatorial regimes tremble. Using these amazing women's experiences as paragons of masterful communication in specific socio-cultural milieus worldwide from the twentieth century to today, this book investigates women peace leaders in the context of international politics and intrigue, and the crucial interrelationships among social justice discourses and rhetorical (suasory) forms of communication. This book's main contribution is exploring nonviolence as a form of communication that is frequently feminized so as to denigrate peacebuilding in societies worldwide. What these women have done is, in effect, taken the brick that was thrown at them - the brick in this case being the prevalent cultural association of women with peace and peace with weakness - and used that 'brick' to build a house in the form of peace and justice activism and successful programs in their respective nations, regions, and internationally. Whereas much of what has been previously written about the women Nobel Peace laureates does not examine their discourses and persuasive strategies specifically, in contrast, this book closely studies their modes of nonviolent rhetoric. Despite the power and might of the international military industrial complex, nonviolent rhetoric doggedly persists in an increasingly globalized public sphere - one in which social justice concerns figure heavily into communication that is spread through international media. In short, this book both celebrates and enables readers to learn from the wisdom of these "dangerous" women whose savvy communication practices foster work in peacebuilding and promoting justice.

Nobel's Women of Peace

Nobel's Women of Peace

Each year since 1901, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to a person who has made a difference in the world. Twelve women have been given this award, and each has her own fascinating story. Each had to struggle to be heard because she was a woman, and each one shares an incredible determination, commitment, and hope for the future. The most recent winner, Wangari Maathai of Kenya, has helped African women plant more than 30 million trees. How does planting trees promote peace? By improving the lives of communities. Aung San Suu Kyi of Burma has also fought to improve lives by trying to bring democracy to her country. MÌÁiread Corrigan Maguire and Betty Williams worked to end violence in Northern Ireland, Jody Williams campaigns to ban landmines, and Mother Theresa was an example of compassion to millions. The courage of the women here will inspire.

Battling Injustice: 16 Women Nobel Peace Laureates

Battling Injustice: 16 Women Nobel Peace Laureates

'Supriya Vani's book will educate people about gender equality and inspire women to rise up to their potential. It will inspire parents not to clip the wings of their daughters. All our girls are meant for stars, and they need equality and freedom to flourish.' -Nobel Peace laureate Malala Yousafzai and her father Ziauddin Yousafzai Malala Yousafzai, Tawakkol Karman, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, Shirin Ebadi - these women and others like them shaped the history of their peoples through their fight against political persecution, social deprivation and gender discrimination. The Nobel Peace Prize memorializes their achievements and courage and ability to inspire hope in others. Through the life portraits of sixteen women Nobel Peace laureates, peace activist and journalist Supriya Vani argues that the fate of the world is inextricably tied to the emancipation of women, and that the cause of world peace urgently requires women leaders. These stories, the result of six years of painstaking research and many interviews, show how we have much to learn from the laureates, from the events that shaped their work to their inner journey of spirit. Women in the workplace, at home, as mothers and nurturers, as leaders, will all find something to take away from this collection. Battling Injustice is an authentic record of women's cultural history, told through the lives of some of the most remarkable women since modernity. 'The lives of the women Nobel Peace laureates detailed in this book by Supriya Vani are clear evidence of my belief that women are naturally more sensitive to others' needs and well-being. They have greater potential for expressing love and affection. Therefore, when, as now, compassionate leadership is required, women should take on a greater role in making this world a better place.' -His Holiness the Dalai Lama 'Supriya Vani's stories of Nobel Peace laureates amount to much more than a sincere tribute to some of the world's most fearless women. By bringing us their voices, their vulnerabilities, their wisdom, she inspires us all to make a difference in the world by tapping into our better selves.' -Arianna Huffington, co-founder of The Huffington Post 'A monumental effort by a vivacious young woman on the human potential for goodness.' -Sharon Stone, American actress and human rights activist 'Since 1999, Nobel Peace Prize laureates have been gathering to reaffirm their commitment to peaceful means of resolving the world's problems. I admire the contribution of women laureates, their energy and warmth. As shown in this book by Supriya Vani, they give their hearts to our common efforts and to the younger generations that will continue their great work.' -Mikhail Gorbachev, former president of the Soviet Union 'Supriya Vani's book is for everyone across the globe. I am sure it will spur many souls to tread the path of humanitarian service, to choose a life of peace and love.' -Nobel Peace laureate Tawakkol Karman 'This book will inspire and motivate young people to work for peace.' -Cherie Blair, British barrister and spouse of former British prime minister Tony Blair 'I recommend this book to the youth. It can inspire them to reach their goals.' -Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi 'Supriya Vani rightly highlights the fact that the world needs more women leaders, who are spiritually, mentally and emotionally equipped to bring peace to our planet.' -Nobel Peace laureate Rigoberta Menchu Tum 'I hope those who read this book will feel inspired to work for disarmament and peace.' -Nobel Peace laureate Mairead Maguire 'In February of 2017, at the XVI World Summit of Nobel Peace laureates held in Bogota, I had the happy opportunity to meet with six of my fellow female laureates. They represent the values of courage, determination, generosity and solidarity shared by millions of women around the planet, who strive each day to make a better, freer and more peaceful world. That is why I welcome and cherish this book by Supriya Vani - the stories of all the sixteen women Nobel Peace laureates must be known. They are a source of inspiration for our youth and every one of us.' -Juan Manuel Santos Calderon, president of Colombia and a Nobel peace laureate

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Gender and Women's Leadership

A Reference Handbook

Gender and Women's Leadership

This work within The SAGE Reference Series on Leadership provides undergraduate students with an authoritative reference resource on leadership issues specific to women and gender. Although covering historical and contemporary barriers to women's leadership and issues of gender bias and discrimination, this two-volume set focuses as well on positive aspects and opportunities for leadership in various domains and is centered on the 101 most important topics, issues, questions, and debates specific to women and gender. Entries provide students with more detailed information and depth of discussion than typically found in an encyclopedia entry, but lack the jargon, detail, and density of a journal article. Key Features Includes contributions from a variety of renowned experts Focuses on women and public leadership in the American context, women's global leadership, women as leaders in the business sector, the nonprofit and social service sector, religion, academia, public policy advocacy, the media, sports, and the arts Addresses both the history of leadership within the realm of women and gender, with examples from the lives of pivotal figures, and the institutional settings and processes that lead to both opportunities and constraints unique to that realm Offers an approachable, clear writing style directed at student researchers Features more depth than encyclopedia entries, with most chapters ranging between 6,000 and 8,000 words, while avoiding the jargon and density often found in journal articles or research handbooks Provides a list of further readings and references after each entry, as well as a detailed index and an online version of the work to maximize accessibility for today's student audience

The Women of the Nobel

The Women of the Nobel

Forty-four women. Forty-four stories of incredible lives, each different from the other, but linked by the same leitmotif of excellence, perseverance and passion. This book aims at being a homage to all the women whose revolutionary discoveries and works have forever changed the history of humankind. It is for that reason, that they received the most prestigious prize of all - the Nobel Prize. By reading these biographies, you can feel to what extent society has changed from the beginning of the twentieth century to today. You will also understand how complicated it was for women born at the turn of the century to enter higher education and to be considered by their male colleagues. Unfortunately, in many fields, this attitude is still present and stronger than ever. Proportionally, only a small percentage of women have received the Swedish medal, a sign that the path to gender equality is still long. Many of them had to fight to establish themselves and make their talent known, often going against their families who saw them exclusively as wives and mothers. But they believed in themselves, had a dream, and with determination overcame every difficulty. Notwithstanding their work, all of these women, scientists, writers, organizers and spokeswomen demonstrate that with perseverance and an openness towards others, you can get where you want. As the great Rita Levi-Montalcini (Nobel Prize in Medicine) said, "The key to human existence is not love, but curiosity".

Peacemakers

Winners of the Nobel Peace Prize

Peacemakers

An essay describing the establishment of the Nobel Peace Prize precedes chronologically organized profiles of all the individuals and organizations that have received the award since 1901.