Why Not Eat Insects?

Why Not Eat Insects?

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Why Not Eat Insects? - Scholar's Choice Edition

Why Not Eat Insects? - Scholar's Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Edible

An Adventure Into the World of Eating Insects and the Last Great Hope to Save the Planet

Edible

An anthropologist and certified entomophagist describes her international travels and studies to make a case for why insects may be the key to solving the world's food problems, explaining how bugs have been a long-time part of indigenous diets and can be efficiently rendered a sustainable food source. 20,000 first printing.

How Not to Be Eaten

The Insects Fight Back

How Not to Be Eaten

Examines the adaptations of insects to avoid being eaten as well as being able to find food for themselves

The Diet of John the Baptist

"Locusts and Wild Honey" in Synoptic and Patristic Interpretation

The Diet of John the Baptist

James A. Kelhoffer offers the first comprehensive study of John the Baptist's diet of "locusts and wild honey" in its socio-historical context and subsequent Christian interpretation.

Insects as Human Food

A Chapter of the Ecology of Man

Insects as Human Food


Sustainable Protein Sources

Sustainable Protein Sources

Protein plays a critical role in human nutrition. Although animal-derived proteins constitute the majority of the protein we consume, plant-derived proteins can satisfy the same requirement with less environmental impact. Sustainable Protein Sources allows readers to understand how alternative proteins such as plant, fungal, algal, and insect protein can take the place of more costly and less efficient animal-based sources. Sustainable Protein Sources presents the various benefits of plant and alternative protein consumption, including those that benefit the environment, population, and consumer trends. The book presents chapter-by-chapter coverage of protein from various sources, including cereals and legumes, oilseeds, pseudocereals, fungi, algae, and insects. It assesses the nutrition, uses, functions, benefits, and challenges of each of these proteins. The book also explores opportunities to improve utilization and addresses everything from ways in which to increase consumer acceptability, to methods of improving the taste of products containing these proteins, to the ways in which policies can affect the use of plant-derived proteins. In addition, the book delves into food security and political issues which affect the type of crops that are cultivated and the sources of food proteins. The book concludes with required consumer choices such as dietary changes and future research ideas that necessitate vigorous debate for a sustainable planet. Introduces the need to shift current animal-derived protein sources to those that are more plant-based Presents a valuable compendium on plant and alternate protein sources covering land, water, and energy uses for each type of protein source Discusses nutritive values of each protein source and compares each alternate protein to more complete proteins Provides an overview of production, including processing, protein isolation, use cases, and functionality Presents solutions to challenges, along with taste modulation Focuses on non-animal derived proteins Identifies paths and choices that require consumer and policymaker debate and action

ÒAn Insect View of Its PlainÓ

Insects, Nature and God in Thoreau, Dickinson and Muir

ÒAn Insect View of Its PlainÓ

"This volume addresses that critical gap by exploring the cultural and literary position of insects in the work of Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, and John Muir. It examines the beliefs these authors share about the nature of our connection to insects and what insects have to teach about creation and our place in it"--Provided by publisher.

Insects and Human Life

Insects and Human Life

This pioneering book looks at the importance of insects to culture. While in the developed West a good deal of time and money may be spent trying to exterminate insects, in other cultures human-insect relations can be far more subtle and multi-faceted. Like animals, insects may be revered or reviled - and in some tribal communities insects may be the only source of food available. How people respond to, make use of, and relate to insects speaks volumes about their culture. In an effort to get to the bottom of our vexed relationship with the insect world, Brian Morris spent years in Malawi, a country where insects proliferate and people contend. In Malawi as in many tropical regions, insects have a profound impact on agriculture, the household, disease and medicine, and hence on oral literature, music, art, folklore, recreation and religion. Much of the complexity of human-insect relations rests on paradox: insects may represent the source of contagion, but they are also integral to many folk remedies for a wide range of illnesses. They may be at the root of catastrophic crop failure, but they can also be a form of sustenance. Weaving science with personal observations, Morris demonstrates a profound and intimate knowledge of virtually every aspect of human-insect relations. Not only is this book extraordinarily useful in terms of the more practical side of entomology, it also provides a wealth of information on the role of insects in cultural production. Malawian proverbs alone provide many such delightful examples - 'Bemberezi adziwa nyumba yake' ('The carpenter bee knows his own home'). This final volume in Morris' trilogy on Malawi's animal and insect worlds is certain to become a classic study of uncharted territory - the insect world that surrounds us and how we relate to it. Praise for The Power of Animals: Although based upon examination of a single culture, Morris incorporates ecological and anthropological concepts that expand this study of

The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, Revised

40 Ways to Cook Crickets, Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin

The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, Revised

With its stylish new package, updated information on the health and environmental benefits of insect eating, and breed-your-own instructions, this new edition of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook is the go-to resource for anyone interested in becoming an entomological epicure. For many Americans, eating a lowly insect is something you’d only do on a dare. But with naturalist and noted bug chef David George Gordon, bug-eating is fun, exciting, and downright delicious! Now you can impress, enlighten, and entertain your family and friends with Gordon’s one-of-a-kind recipes. Spice things up at the next neighborhood potluck with a big bowl of Orthopteran Orzo—pasta salad with a cricket-y twist. Conquer your fear of spiders with a Deep-Fried Tarantula. And for dessert, why not try a White Chocolate and Wax Worm Cookie? (They’re so tasty, the kids will be begging for seconds!) Today, there are more reasons than ever before to explore entomophagy (that’s bug-eating, by the way). It’s an environmentally-friendly source of protein: Research shows that bug farming reduces greenhouse gas emissions and is exponentially more water-efficient than farming for beef, chicken, or pigs. Mail-order bugs are readily available online—but if you’re more of a DIY-type, The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook includes plenty of tips for sustainably harvesting or raising your own. Filled with anecdotes, insights, and practical how-tos, The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook is a perfect primer for anyone interested in becoming an entomological epicure.