Who Is My Self?

A Guide to Buddhist Meditation

Who Is My Self?

Self-transformation is an essential element in all forms of Buddhist meditation--from Tantra to Zen. Ayya Khema, author of the best-selling Being Nobody, Going Nowhere, uses one of the earliest Buddhist suttas to guide us along the path of the oldest Buddhist meditative practice for understanding the nature of "self." By following the Buddha's explanation with clear, insightful examples from her years of teaching meditation, she guides us back and forth between the relative understanding and higher realizations of the Buddhist concept of "self." Her thoughtful contemplation of the Buddha's radical understanding of "self" and her practical advice for achieving insight offer the reader a profound understanding of the "self." Both beginning and advanced practitioners will greatly benefit from Ayya Khema's warm and down-to-earth exposition of the Buddha's meditation on "self."

Who Is My Self?

A Guide to Buddhist Meditation

Who Is My Self?

Self-transformation is an essential element in all forms of Buddhist meditation--from Tantra to Zen. Ayya Khema, author of the best-selling Being Nobody, Going Nowhere, uses one of the earliest Buddhist suttas to guide us along the path of the oldest Buddhist meditative practice for understanding the nature of "self." By following the Buddha's explanation with clear, insightful examples from her years of teaching meditation, she guides us back and forth between the relative understanding and higher realizations of the Buddhist concept of "self." Her thoughtful contemplation of the Buddha's radical understanding of "self" and her practical advice for achieving insight offer the reader a profound understanding of the "self." Both beginning and advanced practitioners will greatly benefit from Ayya Khema's warm and down-to-earth exposition of the Buddha's meditation on "self."

Who is it that can tell me who I am?

Who is it that can tell me who I am?

In this searingly honest memoir, Jane Haynes recalls to her psychotherapist her extraordinary story. Having overcome her strange childhood, overshadowed by her mother's absence and father's descent into madness, the real diagnosis of which the family concealed, she attempts, vividly but without sentimentality, to understand the construction of her own life. Now a psychotherapist in her own right, Haynes opens up her case files, which include a gifted young man on the cusp of a nervous breakdown; the middle-aged woman tormented by suicidal thoughts; the pornography addict, unable to connect emotionally with his girlfriend. Tragedy is brought home to her when her son-in-law is murdered. Her account powerfully demonstrates the resilience and life force of human nature. 'I recommend it to anyone concerned with the life of the imagination' Hilary Mantel

Who Is My Neighbor?

Social Affinity in a Modern World

Who Is My Neighbor?

Points the way toward a world in which we might feel more connected to and responsible for each other.

Art and Answerability

Early Philosophical Essays

Art and Answerability

This book contains three of Bakhtin's early essays from the years following the Russian Revolution, when Bakhtin and other intellectuals eagerly participated in the debates of the period.

Me, Myself and Mind

Me, Myself and Mind

Learn to work with your subconscious mind and body for creating greater health and wellness through skills of self-hypnosis and self-hypnotherapy.

Becoming Myself, Becoming His

Living the Life God Designed for You

Becoming Myself, Becoming His

-'Now with God's help, I shall become myself.'Spiritual growth is a pursuit. It does not happen naturally or without effort. Just like the athlete who trains for a competition, we too must train our hearts and minds to be like Jesus. Our spiritual muscles, like our physical ones, become weak and ineffective when they are not stretched and exercised regularly. Often, Christians may find they are caught up in the 'generality' of living a religious lifestyle, but to truly become the Lord's, we must give him time to work with us. Our days may be so filled with activity and service that we seldom take the time to ask ourselves who it is that God created us to be. If you long for the discipline, order, and focus that Christ speaks of in the Word, then you are longing to discover who God created you to be. See yourself through God's eyes in Becoming Myself, Becoming His.Author Kay Watson lives in Pensacola, Florida, with Scott, her husband of twenty-eight years, and two sons. She has taught in church for over twenty-five years, written curriculum for women and children, and has served as the Women's Ministry Coordinator for the Gateway Church of Christ.

Translated Accounts

Translated Accounts

Set in an unnamed place that appears to be under military rule, this novel comprises of various 'transcribed and/or translated' first-hand narratives of non-English speakers, reminiscent of accounts of incidents in Rwanda, Yugoslavia and even the Cultural Revolution in China. The fragmented, dream like episodes and the broken elegance of the language make "Translated Accounts" a powerful and disconcerting read.

Who is My Echo?

A Mother's Journey Following the Tragic Death of her Son

Who is My Echo?

Read the story of a mother’s journey following the tragic death of her son. On October 22, 2006, Nancy Collins’ son Derek died. Her “normal” existence vanished. Her life’s direction abruptly changed. Ms. Collins gives a poignant memoir of her son’s tragic death and her own personal struggle with major depressive disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and suicide. What develops is an informative account that provides support to others who may be experiencing the challenges and feelings of powerlessness and despair after the death of a loved one, along with good advice for those dealing with individuals who have just experienced the death of someone close to them.

Facets of Eros

Phenomenological Essays

Facets of Eros

In an age which is supposedly experiencing a sexual revolution, a volume of thoughtful essays on eros is not only not out of place but perhaps is a positive contribution to the understanding of contempor ary man. It was the conviction of the editors that the scientific view of sexuality, as promoted in such valuable studies as those conducted by Masters and Johnson, needed considerable supplement and per spective. The perspective is here furnished by writers from both Europe and America, authors from various fields, such as philosophy, psychology, and even musicology, all of whom are united, in that their approach to the problem of eros is phenomenologically oriented. At first it might well seem strange that musicology would have much to say about eros. It is true, musicology has been the "science" of music, at least in intent. Yet in a larger view of the discipline, philo sophical and aesthetic problems are also important to it, and this particularly if we agree with Enzo Paci, that our very culture depends on eros. Surely musical culture, as pointed out by Kierkegaard, is the embodiment of what western civilization has known as sensuality; and Mozart's Don Giovanni is its incarnation. On the surface it is easier for us to grasp the work of the philosopher in this area; and, of course, one expects the psychologist to deal with sexuality more explicitly than anyone else.