Watchmen and Philosophy

How do Ozymandias and Rorschach justify their actions? What are the political ramifications of the Comedian's work for the government? How do we explain the nature of Dr. Manhattan? And can a graphic novel be considered literature?

Watchmen and Philosophy

Alan Moore's Watchmen is set in 1985 and chronicles the alternative history of the United States where the US edges dangerously closer to nuclear war with the Soviet Union. Within this world exists a group of crime busters, who don elaborate costumes to conceal their identity and fight crime, and an intricate plot to kill and discredit these "superheroes." Alan Moore's Watchmen popularized the graphic novel format, has been named one of Time magazine's top 100 novels, and is now being made into a highly anticipated movie adaptation. This latest book in the popular Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture series peers into Moore's deeply philosophical work to parse and deconstruct the ethical issues raised by Watchmen's costumed adventurers, their actions, and their world. From nuclear destruction to utopia, from governmental authority to human morality and social responsibility, it answers questions fans have had for years about Watchmen's ethical quandaries, themes, and characters.

Watchmen and Philosophy

How do Ozymandias and Rorschach justify their actions? What are the political ramifications of the Comedian's work for the government? How do we explain the nature of Dr. Manhattan? And can a graphic novel be considered literature?

Watchmen and Philosophy

Alan Moore's Watchmen is set in 1985 and chronicles the alternative history of the United States where the US edges dangerously closer to nuclear war with the Soviet Union. Within this world exists a group of crime busters, who don elaborate costumes to conceal their identity and fight crime, and an intricate plot to kill and discredit these "superheroes." Alan Moore's Watchmen popularized the graphic novel format, has been named one of Time magazine's top 100 novels, and is now being made into a highly anticipated movie adaptation. This latest book in the popular Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture series peers into Moore's deeply philosophical work to parse and deconstruct the ethical issues raised by Watchmen's costumed adventurers, their actions, and their world. From nuclear destruction to utopia, from governmental authority to human morality and social responsibility, it answers questions fans have had for years about Watchmen's ethical quandaries, themes, and characters.

Superman and Philosophy

Gathering a veritable league of philosophers, Superman and Philosophy addresses all these questions and more. This book will thrill longtime and brand-new fans of Superman alike and will inspire new ways to think about the Man of Steel!

Superman and Philosophy

Go beyond the cape and into the mind of the Man of Steel, intime for release of Zack Snyder's Man of Steel movie andSuperman's 75th anniversary He has thrilled millions for 75 years, with a legacy thattranscends national, cultural, and generational borders, but isthere more to the Man of Steel than just your average mythicsuperhero in a cape? The 20 chapters in this book present afascinating exploration of some of the deeper philosophicalquestions raised by Superman, the Last Son of Krypton and thenewest hero in the Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culturearsenal.

X Men and Philosophy

Through philosophical greats like Aristotle, Sartre, Camus, Levinas, and others, X-Men and Philosophy shows how this remarkable series speaks not only to generations of pop culture audiences, but to the very heart of the human condition.

X Men and Philosophy

X-Men is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (Oneonta, NY) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy (978-1-4051-6316-3) and The Office and Philosophy (978-1-4051-7555-5). Rebecca Housel (Rochester, NY) is a professor at Rochester Institute of Technology, where she teaches about writing and pop culture. For William Irwin's biography, please see below.

Batman and Philosophy

BLACKWELL PHILOSOPHY AND POP CULTURE SERIES This book has not been approved, licensed, or sponsored by any entity or person involved in creating or producing Batman, the comic, the film, or the TV series PHILOSOPHY/POP CULTURE Why doesn't ...

Batman and Philosophy

Why doesn't Batman just kill the Joker and end everyone's misery? Can we hold the Joker morally responsible for his actions? Is Batman better than Superman? If everyone followed Batman's example, would Gotham be a better place? What is the Tao of the Bat? Batman is one of the most complex characters ever to appear in comic books, graphic novels, and on the big screen. What philosophical trials does this superhero confront in order to keep Gotham safe? Combing through seventy years of comic books, television shows, and movies, Batman and Philosophy explores how the Dark Knight grapples with ethical conundrums, moral responsibility, his identity crisis, the moral weight he carries to avenge his murdered parents, and much more. How does this caped crusader measure up against the teachings of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Kierkegaard, and Lao Tzu?

Iron Man and Philosophy

As absorbing as Iron Man comic books and movies, Iron Man and Philosophy: Gives you a new perspective on Iron Man characters, story lines, and themes Shows what philosophical heavy hitters such as Aristotle, Locke, and Heidegger can teach ...

Iron Man and Philosophy

The first look at the philosophy behind the Iron Man comics and movies, timed for the release of Iron Man 2 in March 2010 On the surface, Iron Man appears to be a straightforward superhero, another rich guy fighting crime with fancy gadgets. But beneath the shiny armor and flashy technology lies Tony Stark, brilliant inventor and eccentric playboy, struggling to balance his desires, addictions, and relationships with his duties as the Armored Avenger. Iron Man and Philosophy explores the many philosophical issues that emerge from the essential conflicts found in the decades of Iron Man stories in comics and movies. What kind of moral compass does Tony Stark have? Is Iron Man responsible for the death of Captain America after the Marvel Universe “Civil War”? Should people like Stark run the world? How does Tony’s alcoholism impact his performance as Iron Man, and what does it say about moral character? Ultimately, what can Iron Man teach us about the role of technology in society? As absorbing as Iron Man comic books and movies, Iron Man and Philosophy: Gives you a new perspective on Iron Man characters, story lines, and themes Shows what philosophical heavy hitters such as Aristotle, Locke, and Heidegger can teach us about Tony Stark/Iron Man Considers issues such as addiction, personal responsibility, the use of technology, and the role of government Whether you've been reading the comic books for years or have gotten into Iron Man through the movies, Iron Man and Philosophy is a must-have companion for every fan.

Comics as Philosophy

See Watchmen XII. 17.ii-v. 31. Mungo Thomson informs me that this plot device
comes from a 1950's episode of The Outer Limits called "The Architects of Fear" (
starring Robert Culp, who later figured prominently in the 1980's TV show "The ...

Comics as Philosophy

Through the combination of text and images, comic books offer a unique opportunity to explore deep questions about aesthetics, ethics, and epistemology in nontraditional ways. The essays in this collection focus on a wide variety of genres, from mainstream superhero comics, to graphic novels of social realism, to European adventure classics. Included among the contributions are essays on existentialism in Daniel Clowes's graphic novel "Ghost World," ecocriticism in Paul Chadwick's long-running "Concrete" series, and political philosophies in Herge's perennially popular "The Adventures of Tintin." Modern political concerns inform Terry Kading's discussion of how superhero comics have responded to 9/11 and how the genre reflects the anxieties of the contemporary world. Essayists also explore the issues surrounding the development and appreciation of comics. Amy Kiste Nyberg examines the rise of the Comics Code, using it as a springboard for discussing the ethics of censorship and child protection in America. Stanford W. Carpenter uses interviews to analyze how a team of Marvel artists and writers reimagined the origin of one of Marvel's most iconic superheroes, Captain America. Throughout, essayists in Comics as Philosophy show how well the form can be used by its artists and its interpreters as a means of philosophical inquiry. Jeff McLaughlin is assistant professor of philosophy at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia."

The Avengers and Philosophy

Can a reformed criminal become a superhero? What are the military ethics of the Kree-Skrull war? Is Hank Pym morally responsible for Ultron's behavior? Can Kang really go back in time and kill himself? Can an android love a human?

The Avengers and Philosophy

An engaging look at the philosophical underpinnings of Earth's Mightiest Heroes Avengers assemble! Tackling intriguing dilemmas and issues that no single great philosopher can withstand, this powerful book enlists the brainpower of an A-list team of history's most prominent thinkers to explore the themes behind the action of Marvel Comics' all-star superhero team. Arms you with new insights into the characters and themes of The Avengers Deepens your appreciation both of The Avengers comics and the Joss Whedon movie adaptation Answers the philosophical questions you've always had about Earth's Mightiest Heroes, including: Can a reformed criminal become a superhero? Can an android love a human? If a hero beats his wife, is he still a hero? Helps you think differently about the members of the superhero team—Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, and the others This thought-provoking book will help you understand this band of superheroes better, whether you've followed the Avengers for years or are a Joss Whedon fan just getting to know them.

Game of Thrones and Philosophy

... Potter and Philosophy Edited by Gregory Bassham The Ultimate Lost and
Philosophy Edited by Sharon Kaye Watchmen and Philosophy Edited by Mark D.
White X-Men and Philosophy Edited by Rebecca Housel and J. Jeremy
Wisnewski.

Game of Thrones and Philosophy

An in-depth look at the philosophical issues behind HBO's Game of Thrones television series and the books that inspired it George R.R. Martin's New York Times bestselling epic fantasy book series, A Song of Ice and Fire, and the HBO television show adapted from it, have earned critical acclaim and inspired fanatic devotion. This book delves into the many philosophical questions that arise in this complex, character-driven series, including: Is it right for a "good" king to usurp the throne of a "bad" one and murder his family? How far should you go to protect your family and its secrets? In a fantasy universe with medieval mores and ethics, can female characters reflect modern feminist ideals? Timed for the premiere of the second season of the HBO Game of Thrones series Gives new perspectives on the characters, storylines, and themes of Game of Thrones Draws on great philosophers from ancient Greece to modern America to explore intriguing topics such as the strange creatures of Westeros, the incestuous relationship of Jaime and Cersei Lannister, and what the kings of Westeros can show us about virtue and honor (or the lack thereof) as they play their game of thrones Essential reading for fans, Game of Thrones and Philosophy will enrich your experience of your favorite medieval fantasy series.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy

The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series Series Editor: William Irwin
South Park and Philosophy Edited by ... andPhilosophy Edited by Mark D.
Whiteand Robert Arp House and Philosophy Edited by Henry Jacoby Watchmen
and ...

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy

The essential companion to Stieg Larsson's bestselling trilogyand director David Fincher's 2011 film adaptation Stieg Larsson's bestselling Millennium Trilogy—The Girlwith the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, andThe Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest—is aninternational phenomenon. These books express Larsson's lifelongwar against injustice, his ethical beliefs, and his deep concernfor women's rights. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo andPhilosophy probes the compelling philosophical issues behindthe entire trilogy. What philosophies do Lisbeth Salander and Kanthave in common? To catch a criminal, can Lisbeth and Mikael becriminals themselves? Can revenge be ethical? Drawing on some ofhistory's greatest philosophical minds, this book gives freshinsights into Larsson's ingeniously plotted tale of crime andcorruption. Looks at compelling philosophical issues such as a feministreading of Lisbeth Salander, Aristotelian arguments for why we loverevenge, how Kant can explain why so many women sleep with MikaelBlomkvist, and many more Includes a chapter from a colleague of Larsson's—whoworked with him in anti-Nazi activities—that exploresLarsson's philosophical views on skepticism and quotes fromnever-before-seen correspondence with Larsson Offers new insights into the novels' key characters, includingLisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, and investigates the author,Stieg Larsson As engrossing as the quest to free Lisbeth Salander from herpast, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy isideal reading for anyone interested in unraveling the subtext andexploring the greater issues at work in the story.