Bibliography of Printed Works on London History to 1939

Bibliography of Printed Works on London History to 1939

The history of London is so important in national and indeed international terms, it seems extraordinary that this is the first general bibliography of the subject to appear. It contains over 22,000 selected references to books and articles on the history of London, from the Dark Ages to the beginning of the Second World War. The whole of the former GLC area plus the City is covered. Arrangement is by subject, and there is a substantial analytical index. Material for the bibliography was collected from specialist libraries all over London and beyond. It is a starting point for any enquiry about London's development over the centuries, whether from the academic historian, the amateur or the general enquirer. A supplement is planned, to cover new material on the period.

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Buyer's guide

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Who was who

Who was who


Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-century Britain

Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-century Britain

Women, Poetry, and Politics in Seventeenth-Century Britain offers a new account of women's engagement in the poetic and political cultures of seventeenth-century England and Scotland. Where previous studies have focused on the prominent printed writings of Katherine Philips, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn, this book provides the first extended discussion of seventeenth-century women's political poetry in manuscript, offering detailed new readings ofElizabeth Melville, Anne Southwell, Jane Cavendish, Hester Pulter, and Lucy Hutchinson.

Historic Wake County

The Story of Raleigh & Wake County

Historic Wake County


Networks on Networks

The Physics of Geobiology and Geochemistry

Networks on Networks

Order from chaos is simultaneously a mantra of physics and a reality in biology. Physicist Norman Packard suggested that life developed and thrives at the edge of chaos. Questions remain, however, as to how much practical knowledge of biology can be traced to existing physical principles, and how much physics has to change in order to address the complexity of biology. Phil Anderson, a physics Nobel laureate, contributed to popularizing a new notion of the end of “reductionism.” In this view, it is necessary to abandon the quest of reducing complex behavior to known physical results, and to identify emergent behaviors and principles. In the present book, however, we have sought physical rules that can underlie the behavior of biota as well as the geochemistry of soil development. We looked for fundamental principles, such as the dominance of water flow paths with the least cumulative resistance, that could maintain their relevance across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, together with the appropriate description of solute transport associated with such flow paths. Thus, ultimately, we address both nutrient and water transport limitations of processes from chemical weathering to vascular plant growth. The physical principles guiding our effort are established in different, but related concepts and fields of research, so that in fact our book applies reductionist techniques guided by analogy. The fact that fundamental traits extend across biotic and abiotic processes, i.e., the same fluid flow rate is relevant to both, but that distinctions in topology of the connected paths lead to dramatic differences in growth rates, helps unite the study of these nominally different disciplines of geochemistry and geobiology within the same framework. It has been our goal in writing this book to share the excitement of learning, and one of the most exciting portions to us has been the ability to bring some order to the question of the extent to which soils can facilitate plant growth, and what limitations on plant sizes, metabolism, occurrence, and correlations can be formulated thereby. While we bring order to the soil constraints on growth , we also generate some uncertainties in the scaling relationships of plant growth and metabolism. Although we have made an first attempt to incorporate edaphic constraints into allometric scaling, this is but an initial foray into the forest.