Waking to Danger

Americans and Nazi Germany, 1933-1941

Waking to Danger

This intriguing study is the first comprehensive survey of American public opinion about Nazi Germany in the prewar years. * Numerous quotations from prominent individuals and reports from contemporary newspapers and periodicals * 15 photographs * A bibliography

The Sphinx: Franklin Roosevelt, the Isolationists, and the Road to World War II

The Sphinx: Franklin Roosevelt, the Isolationists, and the Road to World War II

Before Pearl Harbor, before the Nazi invasion of Poland, America teetered between the desire for isolation and the threat of world war. May 1938. Franklin Delano Roosevelt—recently reelected to a second term as president—sat in the Oval Office and contemplated two possibilities: the rule of fascism overseas, and a third term. With Hitler's reach extending into Austria, and with the atrocities of World War I still fresh in the American memory, Roosevelt faced the question that would prove one of the most defining in American history: whether to once again go to war in Europe. In The Sphinx, Nicholas Wapshott recounts how an ambitious and resilient Roosevelt—nicknamed "the Sphinx" for his cunning, cryptic rapport with the press—devised and doggedly pursued a strategy to sway the American people to abandon isolationism and take up the mantle of the world's most powerful nation. Chief among Roosevelt’s antagonists was his friend Joseph P. Kennedy, a stock market magnate and the patriarch of what was to become one of the nation's most storied dynasties. Kennedy's financial, political, and personal interests aligned him with a war-weary American public, and he counted among his isolationist allies no less than Walt Disney, William Randolph Hearst, and Henry Ford—prominent businessmen who believed America had no business in conflicts across the Atlantic. The ensuing battle—waged with fiery rhetoric, agile diplomacy, media sabotage, and petty political antics—would land US troops in Europe within three years, secure Roosevelt's legacy, and set a standard for American military strategy for years to come. With millions of lives—and a future paradigm of foreign intervention—hanging in the balance, The Sphinx captures a political giant at the height of his powers and an American identity crisis that continues to this day.

FDR's Ambassadors and the Diplomacy of Crisis

From the Rise of Hitler to the End of World War II

FDR's Ambassadors and the Diplomacy of Crisis

What effect did personality and circumstance have on US foreign policy during World War II? This incisive account of US envoys residing in the major belligerent countries – Japan, Germany, Italy, China, France, Great Britain, USSR – highlights the fascinating role played by such diplomats as Joseph Grew, William Dodd, William Bullitt, Joseph Kennedy and W. Averell Harriman. Between Hitler's 1933 ascent to power and the 1945 bombing of Nagasaki, US ambassadors sculpted formal policy – occasionally deliberately, other times inadvertently – giving shape and meaning not always intended by Franklin D. Roosevelt or predicted by his principal advisors. From appeasement to the Holocaust and the onset of the Cold War, David Mayers examines the complicated interaction between policy, as conceived in Washington, and implementation on the ground in Europe and Asia. By so doing, he also sheds needed light on the fragility, ambiguities and enduring urgency of diplomacy and its crucial function in international politics.

The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945

The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945

The period spanning the two World Wars was unquestionably the most catastrophic in Europe's history. Despite such undeniably progressive developments as the radical expansion of women's suffrage and rising health standards, the era was dominated by political violence and chronic instability. Its symbols were Verdun, Guernica, and Auschwitz. By the end of this dark period, tens of millions of Europeans had been killed and more still had been displaced and permanently traumatized. If the nineteenth century gave Europeans cause to regard the future with a sense of optimism, the early twentieth century had them anticipating the destruction of civilization. The fact that so many revolutions, regime changes, dictatorships, mass killings, and civil wars took place within such a compressed time frame suggests that Europe experienced a general crisis. The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945 reconsiders the most significant features of this calamitous age from a transnational perspective. It demonstrates the degree to which national experiences were intertwined with those of other nations, and how each crisis was implicated in wider regional, continental, and global developments. Readers will find innovative and stimulating chapters on various political, social, and economic subjects by some of the leading scholars working on modern European history today.

Nazi Films in America, 1933-1942

Nazi Films in America, 1933-1942

"Between 1933 and 1942, nearly 500 German-language films were shown in the U.S., representing almost half of all foreign-language film imports. This is the complete history of German films shown in America from the founding of the Nazi government to America's involvement in the war"--Provided by publisher.

Citizen and Soldier

A Sourcebook on Military Service and National Defense from Colonial America to the Present

Citizen and Soldier

Americans grow up expecting that in a time of need, their country can depend on its people for volunteer service to the military. Indeed, this has been a social and at times legal expectation for the citizenship of this country since 1776. Yet, since the end of World War II United States forces have been caught up in many long term military engagements, and the military aspect of citizenship has become an increasingly marginalized one in a world where only a minority of citizens even vote. Citizen and Soldier: A Sourcebook on Military Service and National Defense from Colonial America to the Present provides a useful framework and supporting documentary evidence for an informed discussion of the development of the American ideal of the "Citizen Soldier". Presented with insightful introductions and useful discussion questions, this concise collection of 27 primary documents takes a close look at the United States military and shows how it became entwined with the rise of American national identity.

The Ambivalent Attaché

Friedrich Von Boetticher in America, 1933-1941

The Ambivalent Attaché


A Communist Front at Mid-century

The American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, 1933-1959

A Communist Front at Mid-century

Provides the first thorough examination of the American Committee for the Protection of Foreign Born, from its defense of prominent labor activists in the 1930s to the 1950s when it served as a legal bulwark for the Communist Party.

2,000 Years of Christian History at a Glance!

Christian History Time Line Pamphlet

2,000 Years of Christian History at a Glance!

Christian History Time Line shows 2,000 years of church history at a glance. Includes brief explanations of more than 200 key people and events that all Christians should know. Special emphasis on world missions, the expansion of Christianity, and Bible translation into other languages. Pamphlet has 14 panels and fits inside a Bible cover 8.5" x 5.5". Pamphlet unfolds to 38 inches long.

World War II and Its Background

A Study Outline

World War II and Its Background