Universal Horrors

The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2d ed.

Universal Horrors

Revised and updated since its first publication in 1990, this acclaimed critical survey covers the classic chillers produced by Universal Studios during the golden age of hollywood horror, 1931 through 1946. Trekking boldly through haunts and horrors from The Frankenstein Monster, The Wolf Man, Count Dracula, and The Invisible Man, to The Mummy, Paula the Ape Woman, The Creeper, and The Inner Sanctum, the authors offer a definitive study of the 86 films produced during this era and present a general overview of the period. Coverage of the films includes complete cast lists, credits, storyline, behind-the-scenes information, production history, critical analysis, and commentary from the cast and crew (much of it drawn from interviews by Tom Weaver, whom USA Today calls “the king of the monster hunters”). Unique to this edition are a new selection of photographs and poster reproductions and an appendix listing additional films of interest.

Universal Horrors

The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-1946

Universal Horrors

Examines the Universal horror film as a body of work and on a picture-by-picture basis.

Universal Monsters: Epic Monsters in Black and White

Universal Monsters: Epic Monsters in Black and White

Anybody who loves scary movies will love this tribute to horror in film. From Phantom of the Opera in 1925 to the 1950s creature features, Hollywood's Universal Studios delivered fantastic films with timeless icons known worldwide: Dracula, Frankenstein, the Mummy, the Wolf Man, the Invisible Man, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. This book looks at the performances of the stars who breathed life into the monsters -- Lon Chaney, Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Jr, Claude Rains, Vincent Price, and others -- while also remembering the excellent supporting players and, of course, the geniuses behind the camera who made these films both horrific and beautiful. A must for classic film lovers.

Universal Terrors, 1951–1955

Eight Classic Horror and Science Fiction Films

Universal Terrors, 1951–1955

 Universal Studios created the first cinematic universe of monsters—Dracula, Frankenstein, the Mummy and others became household names during the 1930s and 1940s. During the 1950s, more modern monsters were created for the Atomic Age, including one-eyed globs from outer space, mutants from the planet Metaluna, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, and the 100-foot high horror known as Tarantula. This over-the-top history is the definitive retrospective on Universal’s horror and science fiction movies of 1951–1955. Standing as a sequel to Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and John Brunas’s Universal Horrors (Second Edition, 2007), it covers eight films: The Strange Door, The Black Castle, It Came from Outer Space, Creature from the Black Lagoon, This Island Earth, Revenge of the Creature, Cult of the Cobra and Tarantula. Each receives a richly detailed critical analysis, day-by-day production history, interviews with filmmakers, release information, an essay on the score, and many photographs, including rare behind-the-scenes shots.

The Horror Film

The Horror Film

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

Universal Monsters

Cavalcade of Horror

Universal Monsters

Featuring long out-of-print artwork by the white-hot Tony Harris (Ex Machina, Starman) and artist Art Adams (Monkeyman & O'Brien), as well as a brand-new introduction and painted cover by multiple Eisner Award Winner Eric Powell (The Goon), this collection tells the original stories of the Universal Monsters—Frankenstein, the Mummy, Dracula, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. From the 1930s to the 1950s, Universal Studios changed horror cinema forever with its legendary run of monster movies. Since then, these timeless tales of terror and tragedy have enthralled generations of audiences and inspired countless creators of the macabre. Now, read the stories of the Universal Monsters as envisioned by some of comics' finest talents.

Lon Chaney, Jr.

Horror Film Star, 1906-1973

Lon Chaney, Jr.

Though he was haunted by the shadow of his legendary father and devastated by alcoholism, Lon Chaney, Jr., carved out a very successful film career as Universal's leading horror star in the 1940s, and later as a leading character actor in Westerns, dramas, and on television. While rightly focused on the career of the underrated actor, this study also explores his life and times.

The Horror Film

The Horror Film

In this volume, Stephen Prince has collected essays reviewing the history of the horror film and the psychological reasons for its persistent appeal, as well as discussions of the developmental responses of young adult viewers and children to the genre. The book focuses on recent postmodern examples such as The Blair Witch Project. In a daring move, the volume also examines Holocaust films in relation to horror. Part One features essays on the silent and classical Hollywood eras. Part Two covers the postWorld War II era and discusses the historical, aesthetic, and psychological characteristics of contemporary horror films. In contrast to horror during the classical Hollywood period, contemporary horror features more graphic and prolonged visualizations of disturbing and horrific imagery, as well as other distinguishing characteristics. Princes introduction provides an overview of the genre, contextualizing the readings that follow. Stephen Prince is professor of communications at Virginia Tech. He has written many film books, including Classical Film Violence: Designing and Regulating Brutality in Hollywood Cinema, 19301968, and has edited Screening Violence, also in the Depth of Field Series.

75 Years of Universal Monsters

75 Years of Universal Monsters

They were like Gods. Count Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Phantom of the Opera, the Bride of Frankenstein, the Wolf Man, the Mummy, and Invisible Man, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon formed a modern-pay pantheon that ruled the mythical kingdom of Hollywood. They dwelt at Universal, their Olympian-like home in the hills of northern Los Angeles. Their stories were the stuff of legend in the most successful horror films ever made. Both the Bela Lugosi version of "Dracula" and the Boris Karloff version of "Frankenstein" debuted in 1931, 75 years ago. They were followed by films that featured the Mummy, the Wolf Man, the Invisible Man, the Phantom of the Opera, and many others. For twenty-five years, from 1931 to 1956, these famous monsters of filmland headlined box office marquees around the world. This book is a loving tribute to the immortal gods and monsters that we celebrate on this seventy-fifth anniversary of the Golden Age of the horror film. This second edition updates material to include "The Shape of Water" (2017) and "The Mummy" (2017) with Tom Cruise.

Universal Monsters

Origins; the Legends Behind the World's Greatest Cinematic Monsters

Universal Monsters

The book tells the stories and explains the legends behind the some of the greatest movie monsters in history. Charting their history from myths and fables told over the centuries, the author guides the reader from the past to the present day, as the Universal Monsters prepare to return to the silver screen for their biggest adventures yet. The classic Universal Monsters have been scaring and delighting audiences for decades. But did you know that these maniacal creeps have been frightening people throughout history? Find out about all the old world folk stories, legends and myths before discovering what lies in store for the future of Universal's Monsters. Universal Monsters: Origins is written by Christopher Ripley author of the Survivor's Guide to Universal Orlando's Halloween Horror Nights.