Tracking the Golden Isles

The Natural and Human Histories of the Georgia Coast

Tracking the Golden Isles

With this collection of essays, Anthony J. Martin invites us to investigate animal and human traces on the Georgia coast and the remarkable stories these traces, both modern and fossil, tell us. Readers will learn how these traces enabled geologists to discover that the remains of ancient barrier islands still exist on the lower coastal plain of Georgia, showing the recession of oceans millions of years ago. First, Martin details a solid but approachable overview of Georgia barrier island ecosystems-maritime forests, salt marshes, dunes, beaches-and how these ecosystems are as much a product of plant and animal behavior as they are of geology. Martin then describes animal tracks, burrows, nests, and other traces and what they tell us about their makers. He also explains how trace fossils can document the behaviors of animals from millions of years ago, including those no longer extant. Next, Martin discusses the relatively scant history-scarcely five thousand years-of humans on the Georgia coast. He takes us from the Native American shell rings on Sapelo Island to the cobbled streets of Savannah paved with the ballast stones of slave ships. He also describes the human introduction of invasive animals to the coast and their effects on native species. Finally, Martin's epilogue introduces the sobering idea that climate change, with its resultant extreme weather and rising sea levels, is the ultimate human trace affecting the Georgia coast. Here he asks how the traces of the past and present help us to better predict and deal with our uncertain future.

Georgia's Land of the Golden Isles

Georgia's Land of the Golden Isles

Since it first appeared in 1956, Mrs. Vanstory's rich narrative of the barrier islands from Ossabaw to Cumberland--and the mainland towns along the way--has become the standard popular history of Georgia's golden coast. Thoroughly revised and with over forty new illustrations, this edition traces the crucial and colorful role these islands have played from the sixteenth century to the twentieth. Home, at one time or another, to the American Indians, the French, the Spanish, and the English; to buccaneers, friars, and priests; to Puritans and Scottish Highlanders; to slave traders, planters, soldiers, statesmen, and millionaires, these islands are as rich in history as they are in natural beauty. Georgia's Land of the Golden Isles now takes the reader through the years from General James Oglethorpe to President Jimmy Carter, unfolding the stories of the lives that have touched, or been touched by, the golden isles of Georgia.

Tracking The Highland Tiger

In Search of Scottish Wildcats

Tracking The Highland Tiger

Over the centuries, one by one, Britain's most formidable wild animals have fallen to the thoughtless march of humankind. A war on predators put paid to our lynxes, wolves and bears, each hunted relentlessly until the last of them was killed. Only our wildcats lived on. The Scottish wildcat's guile and ferocity are the stuff of legend. No docile pet cat, this, but a cunning and shadowy animal, elusive to the point of invisibility, but utterly fearless when forced to fight for its life. Those who saw one would always remember its beauty – the cloak of dense fur marked with bold tiger stripes, the green-eyed stare and haughty sneer, and the broad, banded tail whisking away into the forest's gloom. Driven to the remnants of Scotland's wilderness, the last few wildcats now face the most insidious danger of all as their domesticated cousins threaten to dilute their genes into oblivion. However, the wildest of cats has friends and goodwill behind it. This book tells the story of how the wildcat of the wildwood became the endangered Scottish wildcat, of how it once lived and lives now, and of how we - its greatest enemy - are now striving to save it in its darkest hour.

Wild Plants and Survival Lore

Secrets of the Forest

Wild Plants and Survival Lore

In this first volume of his Secrets of the Forest series, nature educator Mark Warren explains how to identify and use 100 wild plants as food, medicine, and craft. He also covers “primitive” survival skills, from building a shelter, to purifying water, making tools, traps, and snares. With more than 200 original hands-on activities, the book is a step-by-step guide for teachers, scout leaders, outing clubs, and wilderness programs, and anyone interested in the outdoors and forgotten skills. Hikers who want to carry less gear and become more self-reliant by using what the forest has to offer, will find tricks in these pages to lighten their loads. Outdoor rec professionals will expand their knowledge of their natural surroundings to share with their clients. And parents who seek a closer relationship with nature for themselves and their children will learn to become active, adventurous participants in the forest, rather than just occasional visitors. Volume 2: The Art of Creating Fire and Storytelling and Ceremony Volume 3: Eye to Eye with Animals and at Play in the Wild Volume 4: The Art of Archery and Lake to Whitewater Canoeing

Congressional Record

Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress

Congressional Record


The Golfer's Guide to the Carolinas

The Golfer's Guide to the Carolinas

Provides information on location, fees, and facilities for golf courses and resorts in the Carolinas

Let's Go

USA

Let's Go


QST.

QST.