Tracking the Gods

The Place of Myth in Modern Life

Tracking the Gods

Whatever our cultural and religious background or personal psychology, a greater intimacy with myth provides a vital link with meaning, the absence of which is so often behind the neuroses of our time. Here the acclaimed author of The Middle Passage (title 59) explains why a connection with our mythic roots is crucial for us as individuals and as responsible citizens of our age.

The Bushman Way of Tracking God

The Original Spirituality of the Kalahari People

The Bushman Way of Tracking God

The Kalahari Bushmen are the keepers of the world’s oldest living culture. In spite of colossal challenges and never-ending crises, they have survived for over 60,000 years with joy and peace—yet their spiritual teachings, the source of their enduring wisdom, have never been fully presented. For the first time, these ancient oral traditions have been put down onto paper by a researcher so unique, he was featured in American Shaman: an Odyssey of Global Healing Traditions, which won a Best Spiritual Book award from Spirituality & Health magazine. Bradford Keeney takes the reader through the veil of original spirituality, connecting the fragments of world religions to a source that is unlike any other. Through this wisdom, readers can find the deepest meaning, fullest purpose, and highest joy in life. The Bushman’s Way to Tracking God is articulated through twelve original mysteries, including: activating the non-subtle universal life force (what the Bushmen call n/om), heightening emotional experience, vibratory interaction, direct downloading and absorption of sacred knowledge, extraordinary healing, activation of the ecstatic “pump,” spontaneous ways of rejuvenation, attending the spiritual classrooms, so-called telepathy, an uncommon range of mystical experiences, and last but not least, total bliss.

Why Good People Do Bad Things

Understanding Our Darker Selves

Why Good People Do Bad Things

Working with the Shadow is not working with evil, per se. It is working toward the possibility of greater wholeness. We will never experience healing until we can come to love our unlovable places, for they, too, ask love of us. How is it that good people do bad things? Why is our personal story and our societal history so bloody, so repetitive, so injurious to self and others? How do we make sense of the discrepancies between who we think we are—or who we show to the outside world—versus our everyday behaviors? Why are otherwise ordinary people driven to addictions and compulsions, whether alcohol, drugs, food, shopping, infidelity, or the Internet? Why are interpersonal relationships so often filled with strife? Exploring Jung’s concept of the Shadow—the unconscious parts of our self that contradict the image of the self we hope to project--Why Good People Do Bad Things guides you through all the ways in which many of our seemingly unexplainable behaviors are manifestations of the Shadow. In addition to its presence in our personal lives, Hollis looks at the larger picture of the Shadow at work in our culture—from organized religion to the suffering and injustice that abounds in our modern world. Accepting and examining the Shadow as part of one’s self, Hollis suggests, is the first step toward wholeness. Revealing a new way of understanding our darker selves, Hollis offers wisdom to help you to acquire a more conscious conduct of your life and bring a new level of awareness to your daily actions and choices.

Memory, Muses, Memoir

Memory, Muses, Memoir

Why is the memoir genre so important? What is it that drives us to tell our own stories? The ancient Greek myth of Goddess Memory, and her daughters, the Muses, offers new ways to re-enter the stories of our lives and shape them in surprising ways. Mnemosyne's birthing of the Muses underscores her commitment to express all of the facets of her personal story: grief, joy, love, body, breath, history, spirituality, reverie, and humor. The memoirist follows Mnemosyne's imaginal lineage in crafting all memoirs. Memories live in matter, in the very cells of our bodies. Writing our life stories allows us to consider the content of our experiences, the plurality of perspectives from which we can choose to shape them, and the use that we want to make of them. We may choose to write for many reasons, psychological, physical, and cultural healing being just a few. This book suggests the exploration of an imaginable field is possible when we look at how figures from Greek mythology continue to inspire contemporary life writing.

It's Not Rocket Science

It's Not Rocket Science

The Top Ten Bestseller Black holes. DNA. The Large Hadron Collider. Ever had that sneaking feeling that you are missing out on some truly spectacular science? You do? Well, fear not, for help is at hand. Ben Miller was working on his Physics PhD at Cambridge when he accidentally became a comedian. But first love runs deep, and he has returned to his roots to share with you all his favourite bits of science. This is the stuff you really need to know, not only because it matters but because it will quite simply amaze and delight you. 'Let me show you another, perhaps less familiar side of Science; her beauty, her seductiveness and her passion. And let's do it quickly, while Maths isn't looking' Ben Miller 'This book makes climate change actually seem interesting. Not just important - it's obviously important - but interesting. As a result I bought lots of other books about climate change, something I now regret' David Mitchell Ben Miller is, like you, a mutant ape living through an Ice Age on a ball of molten iron, orbiting a supermassive black hole. He is also an actor, comedian and approximately one half of Armstrong & Miller. He's presented a BBC Horizon documentary on temperature and a Radio 4 series about the history of particle physics, and has written a science column for The Times. He is slowly coming to terms with the idea that he may never be an astronaut.

Tracking Apollo to the Moon

Tracking Apollo to the Moon

This is perhaps the most complete, detailed and readable story of manned space-flight ever published. The text begins with the historical origins of the dream of walking on the Moon, covers the earliest Mercury and Gemini flights and then moves on to the end of the Apollo era. In readable, fascinating detail, Hamish Lindsay - who was directly involved in all three programs - chronicles mankind's greatest adventure with a great narrative, interviews, quotes and masses of photographs, including some previously unpublished. In addition to bringing the history of these missions to life the book serves as a detailed reference for space enthusiasts and students.

Tracking Ancient Legends

How the Biblical Flood, Sky Gods, and Ufos Fit into Prehistory

Tracking Ancient Legends

Can we logically combine recent research on human origins with ancient legends of floods, paradise lost, and cloud clad gods destroying civilizations? Yes, says author Alan Daniel, who has thoughtfully joined key primordial legends with mitochondrial DNA research, archeological and anthropological finds, and geological evidence in Tracking Ancient Legends. DNA evidence shows a small band of humans crossed out of Africa into Eurasia about 100,000 BC; however, why is lost to the primordial mists. But the why may be answered by primeval legends overlooked until now. The author theorizes that prehistoric legends may explain the flight from Africa. The model set forth is fascinating, as well as epic in scope. Competing theories are examined, including the ancient astronaut concepts, and the foundations of theory itself. Are aliens from other worlds the source of our legends, or is something much more earthly and surprising the groundwork of our legendary past?

Tracking Bear

An Ella Clah Novel

Tracking Bear

Ella Clah returns in Aimee and David Thurlo's Tracking Bear. "Mystery readers who like their murders solved by applied intelligence will love Ella Clah." --Tony Hillerman A group of businessmen is working to open a uranium mine and nuclear power plant on the Navajo Reservation. The NEED project will provide cheap power to the Navajo nation, employ many who are out of work, and earn income for the tribe by selling surplus power to Arizona, New Mexico, and other western states. Investigating the murder of a Navajo cop during a break-in and robbery, Navajo Police Special Investigator Ella Clah learns that the dead man's father, a retired physicist, is strongly opposed to uranium mining and nuclear plants. Ella's mother, Rose, opposes the plans as well, taking as her cause the health of the workers and the land. Kevin Tolino, the father of Ella's daughter, hires a bodyguard after receiving threats because of his public support of the project. A Navajo community college teacher is assaulted, and his office and home ransacked-apparently by the same person who murdered the Navajo police officer. A tribal official who opposes NEED is murdered. Clues seem to lead to a major supporter of the nuclear project, but the man insists he's being framed. Other area murders are also linked to NEED supporters-but why would a group of wealthy businessmen kill their opponents when they could just outspend them? There has to be more going on than political wrangling, but Ella is fumbling in the dark, with uncooperative witnesses and few clues. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.