Towards a Social History of Early Modern Dutch

Towards a Social History of Early Modern Dutch

From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, patterns of living and communication in the Netherlands transformed dramatically due to developments such as the rise of cities and the invention of the printing press. Now, cultural historian Peter Burke demonstrates the key role these changes played in the growth of early modern Dutch. Burke casts a wide net in order to reveal the factors that led to alterations in the Dutch language, exploring, for example, the ever-changing relationship between the vernacular and Latin, the incorporation of words from other languages, and the birth of a movement toward standardization. Placing these trends in a pan-European context, Burke’s analysis of the evolution of Dutch will prove to be illuminating reading for cultural historians in a variety of fields.

The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts

The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts

Including contributions by historians of early modern European art, architecture, and literature, this book examines the transformative force of the vernacular over time and different regions, as well as the way the concept of the vernacular itself changes in the period.

Doppelganger Dilemmas

Anglo-Dutch Relations in Early Modern English Literature and Culture

Doppelganger Dilemmas

The Dutch were culturally ubiquitous in England during the early modern period and constituted London's largest alien population in the second half of the sixteenth century. While many sought temporary refuge from Spanish oppression in the Low Countries, others became part of a Dutch diaspora, developing their commercial, spiritual, and domestic lives in England. The category "Dutch" catalyzed questions about English self-definition that were engendered less by large-scale cultural distinctions than by uncanny similarities. Doppelgänger Dilemmas uncovers the ways England's real and imagined proximities with the Dutch played a crucial role in the making of English ethnicity. Marjorie Rubright explores the tensions of Anglo-Dutch relations that emerged in the form of puns, double entendres, cognates, homophones, copies, palimpsests, doppelgängers, and other doublings of character and kind. Through readings of London's stage plays and civic pageantry, English and Continental polyglot and bilingual dictionaries and grammars, and travel accounts of Anglo-Dutch rivalries and friendships in the Spice Islands, Rubright reveals how representations of Dutchness played a vital role in shaping Englishness in virtually every aspect of early modern social life. Her innovative book sheds new light on the literary and historical forces of similitude in an era that was so often preoccupied with ethnic and cultural difference.

The First Modern Economy

Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500-1815

The First Modern Economy

A comprehensive economic history of the Netherlands, the first truly modern economy, during its rise to European economic leadership.

The Fiction and Reality of Jan Struys

A Seventeenth-Century Dutch Globetrotter

The Fiction and Reality of Jan Struys

Dutch Sailmaker and sailor Jan Struys' (c.1629-c.1694) account of his various overseas travels became a bestseller after its first publication in Amsterdam in 1676, and was later translated into English, French, German and Russian. This new book depicts the story of its author's life as well as the first singular analysis of the Struys text.

Dialect Death in Europe?

Dialect Death in Europe?


An Economic and Social History of the Netherlands, 1800–1920

Demographic, Economic and Social Transition

An Economic and Social History of the Netherlands, 1800–1920

An Economic and Social History of the Netherlands, 1800–1920 provides a comprehensive account of Dutch history from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century, examining population and health, the economy, and socio-political history. The Dutch experience in this period is fascinating and instructive: the country saw extremely rapid population growth, awesome death rates, staggering fertility, some of the fastest economic growth in the world, a uniquely large and efficient service sector, a vast and profitable overseas empire, characteristic 'pillarization', and relative tolerance. Michael Wintle also examines the lives of ordinary people: what they ate, how much they earned, what they thought about public affairs, and how they wooed and wed. This book will be of central importance to Dutch specialists, as well as European historians more generally.

A World History of Art

A World History of Art

Expanded to include the latest discoveries in prehistoric art as well as the most recent developments in non-Western and modern art, this is an up-to-date and wide ranging history of art.

The Burgher and the Whore

Prostitution in Early Modern Amsterdam

The Burgher and the Whore

Amsterdam was, after London and Paris, the third largest city in early modern Europe, and was renowned throughout Europe for its widespread and visible prostitution. Delving deep into a wide range of sources, but making particular use of the transcripts of thousands of trials, The Burgher and the Whore reconstructs Amsterdam's whoredom in detail. The colourful and fascinating descriptions of the prostitutes, their bawds, their clients, and the police shed new light on the cultural, social, and economic conditions of the lives of poor women in a seafaring society. Lotte van de Pol explores how the vice trade was embedded in Amsterdam's society, economy, and judicial system, and how legislation and policing were shaped by misogynist attitudes towards women and fear of God's wrath and venereal diseases towards sex. The story concentrates on the people living at the margins of a rich metropolis, in which there was a large surplus of women, many of them poor immigrants with little prospect of marriage. Many changes are visible in the 150 years under scrutiny, including the view of prostitution from immorality to trade, and of prostitutes from whores and criminals to paupers. The result is a book that can be read as the history of the Dutch Golden Age from below.