To Katanga and Back

Presents an autobiographical narrative of the author's experiences as a UN delegate in the Belgian Congo, and specifically in the Independent State of Katanga, as it existed in ca. 1960 to 1961 under Moise Tshombe.

To Katanga and Back

Presents an autobiographical narrative of the author's experiences as a UN delegate in the Belgian Congo, and specifically in the Independent State of Katanga, as it existed in ca. 1960 to 1961 under Moise Tshombe.

With Captain Stairs to Katanga

The late 19th century saw practically the entire continent of Africa carved up and partitioned between a handful of European colonial powers. This is the story of the Stairs Expedition, related by the group's medical officer.

With Captain Stairs to Katanga

The late 19th century saw practically the entire continent of Africa carved up and partitioned between a handful of European colonial powers. This is the story of the Stairs Expedition, related by the group's medical officer. First published in 1893, Moloney's fascinating narrative will transport readers to a world of cannibals, missionaries, and slave traders; a provocative military invasion and its bloody climax; and the mercenaries' nightmarish return march.

Ideas Matter

It was the Congo that transformed him from the gifted historian of Parnell and the
pseudonymous "Donat O'Donnell" (the author of Maria Cross) into the "serious . .
. work-artist" Conor Cruise O'Brien, the creator of To Katanga and Back: A UN ...

Ideas Matter

In Ideas Matter a wide array of Irish and international figures pay tribute to Conor Cruise O'Brien, with a collection of original essays on a wide range of issues which fascinated O'Brien: Irish history and politics, the United Nations, the Middle East, African affairs, American studies, the interplay of literature and politics, Edmund Burke, deTocqueville, Camus, and W.B. Yeats. They also reflect, with admiration and affection, on the highlights of a remarkable career. The broad reach of these topics underscores the scope of O'Brien's concerns. This book will be of interest to students of the humanities and political sciences.

Who Killed Hammarskjold

Interview with a Katanga mercenary by Anne Ashe of the BBC, 19 January 1962,
United Nations Archives, S-201-25-12. ... The following account of Morthor draws
largely on O'Brien, To Katanga and Back, chapter 15, 'The Fire in the Garage'; ...

Who Killed Hammarskjold

One of the outstanding mysteries of the twentieth century, and one with huge political resonance, is the death of Dag Hammarskjold and his UN team in a plane crash in central Africa in 1961. Just minutes after midnight, his aircraft plunged into thick forest in the British colony of Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), abruptly ending his mission to bring peace to the Congo. Across the world, many suspected sabotage, accusing the multi-nationals and the governments of Britain, Belgium, the USA and South Africa of involvement in the disaster. These suspicions have never gone away. British High Commissioner Lord Alport was waiting at the airport when the aircraft crashed nearby. He bizarrely insisted to the airport management that Hammarskjold had flown elsewhere - even though his aircraft was reported overhead. This postponed a search for so long that the wreckage of the plane was not found for fifteen hours. White mercenaries were at the airport that night too, including the South African pilot Jerry Puren, whose bombing of Congolese villages led, in his own words, to 'flaming huts ...destruction and death'. These soldiers of fortune were backed by Sir Roy Welensky, Prime Minister of the Rhodesian Federation, who was ready to stop at nothing to maintain white rule and thought the United Nations was synonymous with the Nazis. The Rhodesian government conducted an official inquiry, which blamed pilot error. But as this book will show, it was a massive cover-up that suppressed and dismissed a mass of crucial evidence, especially that of African eye-witnesses. A subsequent UN inquiry was unable to rule out foul play - but had no access to the evidence to show how and why. Now, for the first time, this story can be told. Who Killed Hammarskjold follows the author on her intriguing and often frightening journey of research to Zambia, South Africa, the USA, Sweden, Norway, Britain, France and Belgium, where she unearthed a mass of new and hitherto secret documentary and photographic evidence. At the heart of this book is Hammarskjold himself - a courageous and complex idealist, who sought to shield the newly-independent nations of the world from the predatory instincts of the Great Powers. It reveals that the conflict in the Congo was driven not so much by internal divisions, as by the Cold War and by the West's determination to keep real power from the hands of the post-colonial governments of Africa. It shows, too, that the British settlers of Rhodesia would maintain white minority rule at all costs.

Decolonization and the Cold War

Delhi: Oxford University Press; O'Brien, Conor Cruise (1966), To Katanga and
Back: A UN Case History. London: Hutchinson; Lefever, Ernest (1967), Uncertain
Mandate: Politics of the UN Congo Operation. Baltimore: John Hopkins University
 ...

Decolonization and the Cold War

The Cold War and decolonization transformed the twentieth century world. This volume brings together an international line-up of experts to explore how these transformations took place and expand on some of the latest threads of analysis to help inform our understanding of the links between the two phenomena. The book begins by exploring ideas of modernity, development, and economics as Cold War and postcolonial projects and goes on to look at the era's intellectual history and investigate how emerging forms of identity fought for supremacy. Finally, the contributors question ideas of sovereignty and state control that move beyond traditional Cold War narratives. Decolonization and the Cold War emphasizes new approaches by drawing on various methodologies, regions, themes, and interdisciplinary work, to shed new light on two topics that are increasingly important to historians of the twentieth century.

International Intelligence Cooperation and Accountability

10 Connor Cruise O'Brien, To Katanga and Back (New York: Simon & Schuster,
1962), 76; Brian Urquhart, Hammarskjöld (New York: Knopf, 1972), 159–160. 11
Simon Chesterman, Shared Secrets: Intelligence and Collective Security ...

International Intelligence Cooperation and Accountability

This book examines how international intelligence cooperation has come to prominence post-9/11 and introduces the main accountability, legal and human rights challenges that it poses. Since the end of the Cold War, the threats that intelligence services are tasked with confronting have become increasingly transnational in nature – organised crime, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and terrorism. The growth of these threats has impelled intelligence services to cooperate with contemporaries in other states to meet these challenges. While cooperation between certain Western states in some areas of intelligence operations (such as signals intelligence) is longstanding, since 9/11 there has been an exponential increase in both their scope and scale. This edited volume explores not only the challenges to accountability presented by international intelligence cooperation but also possible solutions for strengthening accountability for activities that are likely to remain fundamental to the work of intelligence services. The book will be of much interest to students of intelligence studies, security studies, international law, global governance and IR in general.

In Spies We Trust

In mid1960, the United Nations sent in an armed force to restore order and
prevent the secession of Katanga. ... To Katanga and Back, O'Brien's account of
the Congolese imbroglio, explains how it was difficult to find out what was going
on.

In Spies We Trust

In Spies We Trust reveals the full story of the Anglo-American intelligence relationship - ranging from the deceits of World War I to the mendacities of 9/11 - for the first time. Why did we ever start trusting spies? It all started a hundred years ago. First we put our faith in them to help win wars, then we turned against the bloodshed and expense, and asked our spies instead to deliver peace and security. By the end of World War II, Britain and America were cooperating effectively to that end. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, the 'special intelligence relationship' contributed to national and international security in what was an Anglo-American century. But from the 1960s this 'special relationship' went into decline. Britain weakened, American attitudes changed, and the fall of the Soviet Union dissolved the fear that bound London and Washington together. A series of intelligence scandals along the way further eroded public confidence. Yet even in these years, the US offered its old intelligence partner a vital gift: congressional attempts to oversee the CIA in the 1970s encouraged subsequent moves towards more open government in Britain and beyond. So which way do we look now? And what are the alternatives to the British-American intelligence relationship that held sway in the West for so much of the twentieth century? Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones shows that there are a number - the most promising of which, astonishingly, remain largely unknown to the Anglophone world.

Humanitarian Intervention and the United Nations

On the O'Brien affair see the protagonist's own account, Conor Cruise O'Brien, To
Katanga and Back (London: Hutchinson, 1962) and for a view reflecting that of
Hammarskjöld himself, Brian Urquhart, Hammarskjöld (London: Bodley Head, ...

Humanitarian Intervention and the United Nations

A concise and analytical overview of the theoretical and moral issues raised by humanitarian intervention, relating this to the recent historical record.Divided into two parts, it will first explore the setting of contemporary humanitarian interventions i

United Nations Peacekeeping in the Post Cold War Era

237 21 Conor Cruise O ' Brien , To Katanga and Back , London , Hutchinson and
Co . , 1962 , pp . 242 - 3 22 Donald Harman Akenson , Conor , A Biography of
Conor Cruise O ' Brien , Vol . II , Montreal , McGill , Queens University Press ,
1994 ...

United Nations Peacekeeping in the Post Cold War Era

In seeking to examine whether peacekeeping fundamentally changed between the Cold War and post-Cold War periods the author concludes that most peacekeeping operations were flawed due to the failure of UN members to agree upon various matters such as achievable objectives, provision of necessary resources and unrealistic expectations.

Longman Companion to European Decolonisation in the Twentieth Century

... Political Awakening in the Congo (1964); Conor Cruise O'Brien, To Katanga
and Back (1962); C. Hoskyns, The Congo since Independence (1965); C. Young,
Politics in the Congo, Decolonization and Independence (1965); J. Gerard-Libois
, ...

Longman Companion to European Decolonisation in the Twentieth Century

This new Companion brings together, in one single volume, all the essential facts and figures relating to European decolonisation in the twentieth century. Professor Chamberlain has taken each European empire in turn (the British, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish, Belgian and Italian) and for each one she has provided a detailed chronology of the process of decolonisation in the individual states.