The Three Daughters of Abraham

The Three Daughters of Abraham

I wrote this book after much study following Sept. 11, 2001. I saw enough so that I felt the need to make my findings available to others. Now, after much more study, my views have developed considerably. There is value in what I had seen before. It was part of my journey to getting where I am now. To the extent that I was in error, it was mostly that I was still taking much of what I read literally. I now realize that the Bible was always meant to be interpreted figuratively. My recent studies and revelations are concerning the Garden of Eden, the Sword of the Lord, and Paul's thorn in the flesh. These things and more are closely related. You can see my current views of various topics at my YouTube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/lakeoffire100 or my discussion group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/anewwineskin/

Three Daughters

A Novel

Three Daughters

An ebullient novel about family secrets and the triumph of sisterly love Driven by a legacy of lies, the shame of their own imperfections, and impending chaos in each of their well-ordered married lives, the three Wasserman daughters struggle with themselves and one another to break their parents' silence and understand their past. Shoshanna, control freak and world-class problem solver, stands on the brink of a Big Birthday in the shadow of the Evil Eye, trying to enjoy her happiness and to overcome her fears while also engineering a double reconciliation between her estranged sisters, and between Leah and their rabbi father. Leah, a brilliant English professor and unreconstructed leader of the left, eloquent and foul-mouthed, a crusading feminist and a passionately conflicted wife and mother, grapples with the meaning of abandonment and the unfamiliar demands of her own roiling needs. Rachel, who has papered over her losses with an athlete's discipline, a fact fetishist's sense of order, and a pragmatism bordering on self-sacrifice, watches her carefully constructed world fall apart and in the rubble discovers the woman she was meant to be. Three Daughters is a rich and complex story of three lives, their loves, and the web of relationships that either hold these lives together or hopelessly entangle them.

Three Daughters, Three Journeys

Quest for Cancer Cure

Three Daughters, Three Journeys

Cancer threatens the lives of people around the world. Women, in particular, are at risk of certain cancers with a genetic cause. Certain mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes put mothers and daughters at risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Unlike many cancers that most commonly occur after age 60, these inheritable cancers threaten women’s lives, health and fertility even when they are young, before most would even begin to go for annual mammogram screenings to check for breast cancer. Three Daughters, Three Journeys takes on the biggest health issue of our time from a global perspective with three heroines fighting for their lives against cancer. Marzena, a Polish oncology nurse, has spent her life treating child patients with cancer. Then, she confronts it in her own family and her own body. Kamola, a rural Indian girl, knows she has symptoms of the same disease that took her mother, but feels afraid to discuss it with her father and brothers, knowing her family cannot afford medical treatment. Kamola confides in Dr Rini Mishra, a doctor testing a new treatment called Neelazin, using a bacterial anticancer protein in food, to destroy cancer cells. Selena, a wealthy woman of color in Chicago, finds out about her genetic risks of breast and ovarian cancer. She has a choice of preventative surgery that will save her life but remove any chance of having children. As she meets women who struggle to afford cancer treatment, Selena dedicates her life to providing affordable homes and counseling to families affected by the disease. Although the drug Neelazin is fictional, the possibility of new cancer treatments using bacterial anticancer proteins is being researched now. A problem with the current chemotherapy for cancer treatment is the high toxicity of most of these drugs, as these drugs can enter both normal and cancer cells, though preferably cancer cells, causing the death of normal cells as well that are important in maintaining health. Another problem is that current chemotherapeutic drugs mostly target a single or few key steps that are important for cancer growth and proliferation and inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The cancer cells respond by quickly changing these single targets, thereby becoming resistant to the drugs, as is reflected in stage IV cancer patients. An alternative to chemotherapy would be to exploit the bacterial evolutionary wisdom and use certain proteins that can have preferential entry to cancer cells in order to minimize normal cell toxicity and multiple targets in cancer cells through protein–protein complex formation, thus reducing resistance development in cancer cells. An interesting advantage of protein drugs is to express them as part of food, and some recent research seems to suggest that oral consumption of such foods may allow the therapeutic protein to reach the blood stream to target the cancer. Women with the genetic risk factors could soon have the choice of taking a pill or such anticancer protein-expressing food to treat or prevent cancer, rather than removing the healthy tissue of the breasts and ovaries. Hopefully, they would not have to choose between fertility and survival, as is the implied message in this book, fictional as it is at this time.

Across Many Mountains

Three Daughters of Tibet

Across Many Mountains

At a Free Tibet demonstration in Moscow in 2001, a Swiss actress is captured on film being arrested. She catches people.s attention for her passion and her striking, Tibetan beauty. A German publisher suggests she tells the world her story. The result is this breathtaking book about Yangzom Brauen.s Tibetan heritage, and most particularly her extraordinary grandmother and mother, who fled Tibet in the early 1950s when the Chinese came to take their country away.

Jefferson's Daughters

Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America

Jefferson's Daughters

The remarkable untold story of Thomas Jefferson’s three daughters—two white and free, one black and enslaved—and the divergent paths they forged in a newly independent America Thomas Jefferson had three daughters: Martha and Maria by his wife, Martha Wayles Jefferson, and Harriet by his slave Sally Hemings. In Jefferson’s Daughters, Catherine Kerrison, a scholar of early American and women’s history, recounts the remarkable journey of these three women—and how their struggle to define themselves reflects both the possibilities and the limitations that resulted from the American Revolution. Although the three women shared a father, the similarities end there. Martha and Maria received a fine convent school education while they lived with their father during his diplomatic posting in Paris—a hothouse of intellectual ferment whose celebrated salonnières are vividly brought to life in Kerrison’s narrative. Once they returned home, however, the sisters found their options limited by the laws and customs of early America. Harriet Hemings followed a different path. She escaped slavery—apparently with the assistance of Jefferson himself. Leaving Monticello behind, she boarded a coach and set off for a decidedly uncertain future. For this groundbreaking triple biography, Kerrison has uncovered never-before-published documents written by the Jefferson sisters when they were in their teens, as well as letters written by members of the Jefferson and Hemings families. She has interviewed Hemings family descendants (and, with their cooperation, initiated DNA testing) and searched for descendants of Harriet Hemings. The eventful lives of Thomas Jefferson’s daughters provide a unique vantage point from which to examine the complicated patrimony of the American Revolution itself. The richly interwoven story of these three strong women and their fight to shape their own destinies sheds new light on the ongoing movement toward human rights in America—and on the personal and political legacy of one of our most controversial Founding Fathers. “Beautifully written . . . To a nuanced study of Jefferson’s two white daughters, Martha and Maria, [Kerrison] innovatively adds a discussion of his only enslaved daughter, Harriet Hemings.”—The New York Times Book Review