Therapy Cracks Me Up!

Cartoons about Psychotherapy

Therapy Cracks Me Up!

Therapy Cracks Me Up is an insightful and humorous collection of cartoons about psychotherapy. It is created by a psychotherapist who has cartooned her way through a career working with kids, teens, adults and seniors. This book reveals many of the joys, pains and frustrations of the human condition as they show up in the therapy hour ("Clem the Stem Cell has an identity crisis"). Clients baffled by rapidly changing political, social and cultural forces ("Potato Head experiments with gender identity") and therapists dealing with ever-changing therapeutic modalities, diagnoses ("Diagnosis by Daisy Petal Picking") and medications are depicted here to enlighten and amuse you. Therapy Cracks Me Up provides a comic perspective on every age, from childhood ("I have attention deficit disorder - I need more attention!"), through teens and young adulthood, married life ("I didn't start the fight - that was a pre-emptive strike!"), middle age and the senior years ("I not only have a bucket list - I have a f*ck-it list"). The whimsical drawings and situations appeal to therapists and clients alike, as well as anyone who has ever read a self-help book or Googled a diagnosis.

Diesel Therapy

Diesel Therapy

While cooling her heels in Federal Prison, Selena finds herself an unwilling pawn in a deadly game played by powers beyond her understanding. Her enemies aren’t finished hurting her. Selena is completely under their control and subjected to the most cruel form of punishment known to the Federal Prison System. But when presented with an unexpected opportunity to right old wrongs, Selena chooses her own way—and to hell with the powers that be. As her course twists and turns, Selena takes on the unlikeliest ally of all. She enlists hell’s own soldier as she commands her reckoning against her true enemies. Diesel Therapy is the second book in the Selena series. Praise for the SELENA SERIES: “Greg Barth cooked up something mean and served it up and I hope none of you choke on it because it’s mighty tasty.” —Eryk Pruitt, author of Hashtag and Dirtbags “It’s like the wildest of the men’s adventure novels of the ’70s, updated for the new millennium. Definitely not for the faint of heart.” —Bill Crider “Reminiscent of Larry Brown’s Fay, but less innocent and more violent, Selena combines fine writing and an indelible character to help fill the gap of female protagonists in the world of noir.” —Vicki Hendricks, author of Miami Purity “Greg Barth writes with a knife-like edge…A fast, crazy read.” —Marietta Miles, author of Route 12 “Greg Barth writes a hell of a book. He steps on the gas and doesn’t let up for a second.” —Michael Finamore “Mister Barth writes well—hard charging and fast paced.” —Tony Knighton, author of Three Hours Past Midnight “This book had me turning pages and gritting my teeth…a total punch to the gut, and it hurts so good.” —S. W. Lauden, author of Crosswise “Selena is a visceral pulp thriller that had me gripped from the outset.” —Tom Leins, of Dirty Books Blog “This series is a literary legend in the making” —Will Viharo, author of Love Stories Are Too Violent For Me “Selena is a tour de force of unapologetic sex and violence, not for the faint of heart but definitely for hardcore fans of fast paced, unrelenting pulp-noir in the fashion of nobody except Greg Barth.” —Shane D. Keene

The Angry Therapist

A No BS Guide to Finding and Living Your Own Truth

The Angry Therapist

Tackling relationships, career, and family issues, John Kim, LMFT, thinks of himself as a life-styledesigner, not a therapist. His radical new approach, that he sometimes calls “self-help in a shot glass” is easy, real, and to the point. He helps people make changes to their lives so that personal growth happens organically, just by living. Let’s face it, therapy is a luxury. Few of us have the time or money to devote to going to an office every week. With anecdotes illustrating principles in action (in relatable and sometimes irreverent fashion) and stand-alone practices and exercises, Kim gives readers the tools and directions to focus on what's right with them instead of what's wrong. When John Kim was going through the end of a relationship, he began blogging as The Angry Therapist, documenting his personal journey post-divorce. Traditional therapists avoid transparency, but Kim preferred the language of "me too" as opposed to "you should." He blogged about his own shortcomings, revelations, views on relationships, and the world. He spoke a different therapeutic language —open, raw, and at times subversive — and people responded. The Angry Therapist blog, that inspired this book, has been featured in The Atlantic Monthly and on NPR.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Over the past two decades, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) emerged as a leading-edge method for helping parents improve their children's disruptive and oppositional behavior. Today, PCIT has a robust evidence base; is used across the country in settings as diverse as hospitals, mental health centers, schools, and mobile clinics; and is rapidly gaining popularity in other parts of the world. In keeping with this increasing recognition of PCIT's effectiveness, the authors of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy present this expanded clinical edition to keep readers up to date on new practice developments, current treatment protocols, and the latest research findings. This update retains the fundamentals as detailed by PCIT's founder, Dr. Sheila Eyberg, including an overview of the therapy, detailed description of the course of treatment, and handout materials. The text goes further to explore the evolution of PCIT outside the original target ages of three-to-six (including preventive PCIT for very young children at risk) and examines the use of PCIT with special child populations, such as abuse victims and those with ADHD. Contributing experts discuss uses of the therapy in school, at home, with minorities, and with highly stressed families. But regardless of the population, setting, or topic covered, interventions remain faithful to basic PCIT principles and methods. New features of the expanded second edition include: Adaptations of PCIT for babies, toddlers, preteens, and siblings. Applications for abuse survivors, children with developmental disabilities, ADHD, and severe aggression problems. Uses of PCIT with separating or divorced parents. Culturally relevant PCIT for ethnic minority and international families. Teacher-child, staff-child, and home-based applications. PCIT training guidelines. A brand-new chapter summarizing current research supporting PCIT. As PCIT broadens its scope, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, Second Edition, brings innovative ideas and proven techniques to clinical child psychologists, school psychologists, and other mental health providers working to enhance the lives of children and their families.

Summer I Found You

Summer I Found You

Kate's dream boyfriend has just broken up with her and she's still reeling from her diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Aidan planned on being a lifer in the army and went to Afghanistan straight out of high school. Now he's a disabled young veteran struggling to embrace his new life. When Kate and Aidan find each other neither one wants to get attached. But could they be right for each other after all?

Falling Through the Cracks

Psychodynamic Practice with Vulnerable and Oppressed Populations

Falling Through the Cracks

Psychodynamic theory and practice are often misunderstood as appropriate only for the worried well or for those whose problems are minimal or routine. Nothing could be further from the truth. This book shows how psychodynamically informed, clinically based social care is essential to working with individuals whose problems are both psychological and social. Each chapter addresses populations struggling with structural inequities, such as racism, classism, and discrimination based on immigrant status, language differences, disability, and sexual orientation. The authors explain how to provide psychodynamically informed assessment and practice when working with those suffering from mental illness, addiction, homelessness, and cognitive, visual, or auditory impairments, as well as people in prisons, in orphanages, and on child welfare. The volume supports the idea that becoming aware of ourselves helps us understand ourselves: a key approach for helping clients contain and name their feelings, deal with desire and conflict, achieve self-regulation and self-esteem, and alter attachment styles toward greater agency and empowerment. Yet autonomy and empowerment are not birthrights; they are capacities that must be fostered under optimal clinical conditions. This collection uses concepts derived from drive theory, ego psychology, object relations, trauma theory, attachment theory, self psychology, relational theories, and intersubjectivity in clinical work with vulnerable and oppressed populations. Contributors are experienced practitioners whose work with vulnerable populations has enabled them to elicit and find common humanity with their clients. The authors consistently convey respect for the considerable strength and resilience of the populations with whom they work. Emphasizing both the inner and social structural lives of client and clinician and their interacting social identities, this anthology uniquely realizes the complexity of clinical practice with diverse populations.

Cognitive Therapy for Addiction

Motivation and Change

Cognitive Therapy for Addiction

An innovative new approach to addiction treatment that pairs cognitive behavioural therapy with cognitive neuroscience, to directly target the core mechanisms of addiction. Offers a focus on addiction that is lacking in existing cognitive therapy accounts Utilizes various approaches, including mindfulness, 12-step facilitation, cognitive bias modification, motivational enhancement and goal-setting and, to combat common road blocks on the road to addiction recovery Uses neuroscientific findings to explain how willpower becomes compromised-and how it can be effectively utilized in the clinical arena

The Myth of the Untroubled Therapist

Private life, professional practice

The Myth of the Untroubled Therapist

Therapists are often expected to be immune to the kind of problems that they help clients through. This book serves to demonstrate that this is certainly not the case: they are no more resistant to difficult and unexpected personal circumstances than anyone else. In this book Marie Adams looks into the kind of problems that therapists can be afraid to face in their own lives, including divorce, bereavement, illness, depression and anxiety and uses the experience of others to examine the best ways of dealing with them. The Myth of the Untroubled Therapist looks at the lives of forty practitioners to learn how they coped during times of personal strife. CBT, psychoanalytic, integrative and humanistic therapists from an international array of backgrounds were interviewed about how they believed their personal lives affected their work with clients. Over half admitted to suffering from depression since entering the profession and many continued practising while ill or under great stress. Some admitted to using their work as a ‘buffer’ against their personal circumstances in an attempt to avoid focusing on their own pain. Using clinical examples, personal experience, research literature and the voices of the many therapists interviewed, Adams challenges mental health professionals to take a step back and consider their own well-being as a vital first step to promoting insight and change in those they seek to help. Linking therapists’ personal histories to their choice of career, The Myth of the Untroubled Therapist pinpoints some of the key elements that may serve, and sometimes undermine, counsellors working in private practice or mental health settings. The book is ideal for counsellors and psychotherapists as well as social workers and those working within any kind of helping profession.

Fighting the Urge

Fighting the Urge

Taint and Alana are in love. But this is no normal love, no, Taint suffers from Depression. Alana deals with Bulimia. They do everything they can to help each other, meeting others on the way; a strange boy called Garth with an unhealthy obsession with fire and the very source of all three of their problems: Two Men.