Their Promised Land

Ian Buruma's maternal grandparents, Bernard and Winifred (Bun & Win), wrote to each other regularly throughout their life together.

Their Promised Land

Ian Buruma's maternal grandparents, Bernard and Winifred (Bun & Win), wrote to each other regularly throughout their life together. The first letters were written in 1915, when Bun was still at school at Uppingham and Win was taking music lessons in Hampstead. They were married for more than sixty years, but the heart of their remarkable story lies within the span of the two world wars. After a brief separation, when Bernard served as a stretcher bearer on the Western Front during the Great War, the couple exchanged letters whenever they were apart. Most of them were written during the Second World War and their correspondence is filled with vivid accounts of wartime activity at home and abroad. Bernard was stationed in India as an army doctor, while Win struggled through wartime privation and the Blitz to hold her family together, including their eldest son, the later film director John Schlesinger (Midnight Cowboy, Sunday Bloody Sunday), and twelve Jewish children they had arranged to be rescued from Nazi Germany. Their letters are a priceless record of an assimilated Jewish family living in England throughout the upheavals of the twentieth century and a moving portrait of a loving couple separated by war. By using their own words, Ian Buruma has created a spellbinding homage to the sustaining power of a family's love and devotion through very dark days

The Films of John Schlesinger

Berkeley: University of California Press. Buruma, Ian. 2006. Conversations with
John Schlesinger. New York: Random House. 2016. Their Promised Land: My
Grandparents in Love and War. New York: Penguin. Cahill, Rowan. 1980. “
Review.

The Films of John Schlesinger

The city, with its manifold distractions and violence, its invitation to intoxication and dream, had long served to represent the experience of modernity in works of art at the time John Schlesinger made his acclaimed urban documentary ‘Terminus’ in 1961. To be a reader of the city was to be a reader of modern life, and Schlesinger was a discriminating, at times relentless, reader of the city throughout his career, especially in his three greatest films, ‘Midnight Cowboy’, ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’ and ‘The Day of the Locust’, set in New York, London and Los Angeles, respectively. His character-driven stories, evocation of the significance of the everyday, and insistence on ambiguities of situation and motive – all qualities he was known for – point to literary influences that reach back to the nineteenth century and earlier. ‘The Films of John Schlesinger’ is not only the first book to fully acknowledge those influences, but also the first book to explicate the power of his art to capture the modern, urban experiences of becoming an adult in an atmosphere that relentlessly promotes fantasies of success and wealth; of coming to terms with one’s national identity in the context of international politics; and of attempting to transform the past, both personal and cultural, into a viable present.

Pamela Hansford Johnson

The Singer in His Chains: Myth and Reality in the Life of Dylan Thomas. BBC
Radio 4 1978 II.07. Interviewer Hallam Tennyson and ... Their Promised Land: My
Grandparents in Love and War. New York: Penguin Press, 2016. Connolly, Cyril.

Pamela Hansford Johnson

Deirdre David traces the successful writing life of Pamela Hansford Johnson (1912-1981) from the time of her childhood growing up in a theatrical household in South London to her death as the widow of the novelist and popular intellectual C. P. Snow. Forced to leave school at sixteen, she trained as a shorthand typist, worked for four years in the mid 1930 for a West End Bank, and conducted a tumultuous romance with the then 19-year old poet Dylan Thomas. Thomas having persuaded her she would become a better novelist than a poet she published a scandalous first novel in 1935 and went on to publish close to thirty more in her career. A passionate defender of the narrative traditions of the British novel, she contributed many essays and reviews on contemporary fiction to periodicals and newspapers; in her own fiction, in the nineteenth-century traditions of Jane Austen, George Eliot, and Charles Dickens, she focused on the domestic everyday, the moral questions facing a rapidly-changing society, and the challenges and pleasures of urban life. She was very much a novelist of the city, particularly London. She also gained praise and criticism for her writings about violence and pornography, especially in her well-known analysis of the notorious Moors murder trial. With C. P. Snow, she travelled many times to the United States and the Soviet Union and at the time of her death in 1981, she was still at work on her last novel. Hers was a rich, courageous, and politically committed writing life, and this biography restores Johnson's work to the critical distinction it received when it was published.

Sisi

Pataki reimagines the reign of the nineteenth-century Princess Diana in this stunning book.”—Michelle Moran, internationally bestselling author of Rebel Queen “Emotional, exuberant, masterly, Sisi swept me into the glittering, ...

Sisi

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • For readers of Philippa Gregory, Paula McLain, and Daisy Goodwin comes a sweeping and powerful novel by Allison Pataki. Sisi tells the little-known story of Empress Elisabeth of Austria-Hungary, the Princess Diana of her time, in an enthralling work of historical fiction that is also a gripping page-turner. Married to Emperor Franz Joseph, Elisabeth—fondly known as Sisi—captures the hearts of her people as their “fairy queen,” but beneath that dazzling persona lives a far more complex figure. In mid-nineteenth-century Vienna, the halls of the Hofburg Palace buzz not only with imperial waltzes and champagne but with temptations, rivals, and cutthroat intrigue. Feeling stifled by strict protocols and a turbulent marriage, Sisi grows restless. A free-spirited wanderer, she finds solace at her estate outside Budapest. There she rides her beloved horses and enjoys visits from the Hungarian statesman Count Andrássy, the man with whom she’s unwittingly fallen in love. But tragic news brings Sisi out of her fragile seclusion, forcing her to return to her capital and a world of gossip, envy, and sorrow where a dangerous fate lurks in the shadows. Through love affairs and loss, dedication and defiance, Sisi struggles against conflicting desires: to keep her family together, or to flee amid the collapse of her suffocating marriage and the gathering tumult of the First World War. In an age of crumbling monarchies, Sisi fights to assert her right to the throne beside her husband, to win the love of her people and the world, and to save an empire. But in the end, can she save herself? Featuring larger-than-life historic figures such as Bavaria’s “Mad King Ludwig” and the tragic Crown Prince Rudolf, and set against many of Europe’s grandest sites—from Germany’s storied Neuschwanstein Castle to England’s lush shires—Sisi brings to life an extraordinary woman and the romantic, volatile era over which she presided. Praise for Sisi “Pataki successfully juggles numerous political and personal plot lines while maintaining her focus on a fascinating central character. . . . Readers of Pataki’s first book will want to know the rest of Sisi’s story, but this novel stands on its own for historical fiction fans.”—Library Journal “A deeply moving book about a complex character.”—BookPage “A satisfying saga of the late Habsburg period.”—Kirkus Reviews “Pataki brings richness and relevance to the story of the woman who worked tirelessly to protect the face of an empire.”—Publishers Weekly “Pataki simply stuns me with each new book. I savor each page. Sisi is her best yet!”—Kathie Lee Gifford “Readers will enjoy the glorious dilemma of whether to turn the pages swiftly, breathlessly following Empress Sisi from one astonishing, heartbreaking adventure to the next, or to linger and luxuriate in Pataki’s vivid, sumptuous descriptions of the Habsburg court.”—Jennifer Chiaverini, New York Times bestselling author of Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker “This entire novel is irresistible—completely impossible to put down! Pataki reimagines the reign of the nineteenth-century Princess Diana in this stunning book.”—Michelle Moran, internationally bestselling author of Rebel Queen “Emotional, exuberant, masterly, Sisi swept me into the glittering, treacherous world of the waning Habsburg empire. A must-read.”—Lynn Cullen, bestselling author of Mrs. Poe From the Hardcover edition.

My Promised Land

So Israelis love dairy desserts. Hilda and Michael Strauss recognized the
potential soon after the 1967 war. They understood that ... everything must taste.
They realized that Israeli salty snacks had to be much saltier than their American
counterparts, and ... They left behind a son, a daughter, seven grandchildren, and
the most advanced dairy products company in the Middle East. In 1997, twelve
years ...

My Promised Land

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND THE ECONOMIST Winner of the Natan Book Award, the National Jewish Book Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas L. Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the essence and the beating heart of the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. Facing unprecedented internal and external pressures, Israel today is at a moment of existential crisis. Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, illuminating the pivotal moments of the Zionist century to tell a riveting narrative that is larger than the sum of its parts: both personal and national, both deeply human and of profound historical dimension. We meet Shavit’s great-grandfather, a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people; the idealist young farmer who bought land from his Arab neighbor in the 1920s to grow the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the visionary youth group leader who, in the 1940s, transformed Masada from the neglected ruins of an extremist sect into a powerful symbol for Zionism; the Palestinian who as a young man in 1948 was driven with his family from his home during the expulsion from Lydda; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the pragmatic engineer who was instrumental in developing Israel’s nuclear program in the 1960s, in the only interview he ever gave; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; the dot-com entrepreneurs and young men and women behind Tel-Aviv’s booming club scene; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms ominously over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Culminating with an analysis of the issues and threats that Israel is currently facing, My Promised Land uses the defining events of the past to shed new light on the present. The result is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape. Praise for My Promised Land “This book will sweep you up in its narrative force and not let go of you until it is done. [Shavit’s] accomplishment is so unlikely, so total . . . that it makes you believe anything is possible, even, God help us, peace in the Middle East.”—Simon Schama, Financial Times “[A] must-read book.”—Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times “Important and powerful . . . the least tendentious book about Israel I have ever read.”—Leon Wieseltier, The New York Times Book Review “Spellbinding . . . Shavit’s prophetic voice carries lessons that all sides need to hear.”—The Economist “One of the most nuanced and challenging books written on Israel in years.”—The Wall Street Journal

Red Now and Laters

Aboard the Schooner Jeannette, Due Northwest at Approximately Ten Knots in
the Gulf of Mexico My uncle Emmanuel Guillory ... His grandparents' storied love
affair was the talk of the legal community and French aristocracy. ... P. E.
Desdunes had promised a land of freedom and liberty in the Jacobin tradition,
but Nonc Emmanuel didn't give a damn about idealism or politics, only soil. He
was a farmer. The Civil War had forced many of us, les gens du couleur libres, to
pick sides.

Red Now and Laters

“Guillory’s complex and mesmerizing novel spans numerous eras of family history and southern folklore, offering a haunting yet soulful portrait of a neglected American culture” (Booklist). Meet Ti John, a young boy growing up in Texan Creole culture in the 1980s, the decade of Reaganomics, disco music, and the candy of choice—red Now and Laters. Raised in a Black Creole family by a voodoo-practicing father and strict Catholic mother, he is blessed with a special gift: spiritual healing. But life in the Houston ghetto where he lives is never easy. Ti John struggles to remain an ordinary kid, but even with a rodeo-star father he idolizes and the help of supernatural guides, nothing can shield Ti John from the roughness of inner-city life. He witnesses violence and death, gets his heart broken by girls, feels the anger of his own embittered father, struggles to live up to his mother’s middle-class aspirations—all while trying to become the man he’s expected to be. Will Ti John fall prey to the bad side of life—or will he recognize and hold on to the good? Multilayered and multigenerational, this tremendous literary debut breathes new life into the coming-of-age novel through “a truly unforgettable world of spirits and magical men” (Dolen Perkins-Valdez, author of Wench). Red Now and Laters is a poignant and uniquely American story, as memorable and flavorful as the candy itself.

The Man in the Garden

I promised a land flowing with milk and honey I promised a paradise for you I
promised that you could finally come home All my ... Her shameless actions,
regretted for the rest of her life, had set a war in motion. ... Would he have smiled
as he held Sarah's hand and watched their grandchildren playing in the fields?
His love for a wayward nephew, impatience for a son and Sarah's jealousy had
all caused tremendous hurdles in their lives and changed the course of history
forever.

The Man in the Garden


Black Farmers in America

worked with slave labor; now it instead held a promise of prosperity and
happiness that could be passed on to their descendants. ... Sadly she tells a
visitor that her neighbors, her children, her grandchildren have all moved away
from the land. ... for understanding why slaves freed after the Civil War sacrificed
everything to buy land and become independent farmers. We experience their
love of the land as a way of life, a life that will endure only if our society can
muster the economic ...

Black Farmers in America


My Acadians

I remember how delightful it was to spend the night at my grandparents and to
listen to them sing the beautiful songs of love and war that were handed down
from their ... THE ACADIANS ( Dispersed by the British in 1755 , The Promise
Land.

My Acadians


Enemy in the promised land

To love nature. 6. To be obedient to one's leaders. 7. To be full of joy and gaiety.
8. To be thrifty and generous. 9. ... Many of her contemporaries — the children
and grandchildren of revolutionaries — moved away from the kibbutz and the
utopianism of their parents and toward a more materialistic and ... Michelle said, "
there was a war between our socialist education and the American pop culture.

Enemy in the promised land