The Yellow World

How Fighting for My Life Taught Me How to Live

The Yellow World

A sensational memoir with all the emotional power of The Fault in Our Stars, The Yellow World is the story of cancer and survival that has moved and inspired readers around the world. My heroes don’t wear red capes. They wear red bands. Albert Espinosa never wanted to write a book about cancer—so he didn’t. Instead, he shares his most touching, funny, tragic, and happy memories in the hopes that others, healthy and sick alike, can draw the same strength and vitality from them. At thirteen, Espinosa was diagnosed with cancer, and he spent the next ten years in and out of hospitals, undergoing one daunting procedure after another, starting with the amputation of his left leg. After going on to lose a lung and half of his liver, he was finally declared cancer-free. Only then did he realize that the one thing sadder than dying is not knowing how to live. In this rich and rewarding book, Espinosa takes us into what he calls “the yellow world,” a place where fear loses its meaning; where strangers become, for a moment, your greatest allies; and where the lessons you learn will nourish you for the rest of your life. U.K. praise for The Yellow World “With its uplifting message and simple philosophy, [The Yellow World] has the makings of a spiritual classic.”—The Sunday Times “[An] energetic rush of a book . . . that shines with comedy and grace.”—The Independent “Heartwarming . . . the book everyone’s talking about.”—Mail on Sunday

A Yellow World

A Yellow World


Tales of Daring and Danger

Tales of Daring and Danger

Though he originally wrote for a younger audience, the action-adventure tales of author G.A. Henty are thrilling reads for all ages. This engaging volume collects a number of Henty's exotic and exciting stories that are sure to set your pulse racing.

The Navajo of North America

The Navajo of North America

Introduces the history, modern and traditional cultural practices, and modern and traditional economies of the Navajo people of the southwestern United States, as well as information about the landscape, fauna, and flora of the region.

Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend

Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend

Goodreads finalist 2012 as voted by over 1 million readers My name is BUDO. I have been alive for 5 years. 5 years is a very long time for someone like me to be alive. MAX gave me my name. Max is 8 years old. He is the only human person who can see me. I know what Max knows, and some things he doesn't. I know that Max is in danger. And I know that I am the only one who can save him.

The Yellow Heart

The Yellow Heart

Playful and irreverent, filled with improvisational spirit, Neruda delivers a book called "Essential" by Library Journal.

The Yellow Journalism

The Press and America's Emergence as a World Power

The Yellow Journalism

"Most notable among Hearst's competitors was The World, owned and managed by a Jewish immigrant named Joseph Pulitzer. In The Yellow Journalism, David R. Spencer describes how the evolving culture of Victorian journalism was shaped by the Yellow Press. He details how these two papers and others exploited scandal, corruption, and crime among New York's most influential citizens and its most desperate inhabitants - a policy that made this "journalism of action" remarkably effective, not just as a commercial force but also as an advocate for the city's poor and defenseless."--BOOK JACKET.

“His Dominion” and the “Yellow Peril”

Protestant Missions to Chinese Immigrants in Canada, 1859-1967

“His Dominion” and the “Yellow Peril”

A history of Chinese immigrants encounter with Canadian Protestant missionaries, “His Dominion” and the “Yellow Peril”: Protestant Missions to Chinese Immigrants in Canada, 1859-1967, analyzes the evangelizing activities of missionaries and the role of religion in helping Chinese immigrants affirm their ethnic identity in a climate of cultural conflict. Jiwu Wang argues that, by working toward a vision of Canada that espoused Anglo-Saxon Protestant values, missionaries inevitably reinforced popular cultural stereotypes about the Chinese and widened the gap between Chinese and Canadian communities. Those immigrants who did embrace the Christian faith felt isolated from their community and their old way of life, but they were still not accepted by mainstream society. Although the missionaries’ goal was to assimilate the Chinese into Anglo-Saxon Protestant culture, it was Chinese religion and cultural values that helped the immigrants maintain their identity and served to protect them from the intrusion of the Protestant missions. Wang documents the methods used by the missionaries and the responses from the Chinese community, noting the shift in approach that took place in the 1920s, when the clergy began to preach respect for Chinese ways and sought to welcome them into Protestant-Canadian life. Although in the early days of the missions, Chinese Canadians rejected the evangelizing to take what education they could from the missionaries, as time went on and prejudice lessened, they embraced the Christian faith as a way to gain acceptance as Canadians.