The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting

The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting

This is the first book to explore in detail the world history of humankind's use of bees from prehistoric times to the present day. Both rock art and recent field studies have shown how honey hunters obtained their harvest from bees' nests. Honey has always been the chief prize, but bee brood has been eaten as meat, and beeswax has been utilized in many technologies. Bees, honey, and wax have special symbolic significance in both early beliefs and later world religions. But perhaps bees' greatest benefit has been their pollination of crops.

Bees in America

How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation

Bees in America

In this enlightening cultural history of bees and beekeeping in the United States, Horn, herself a beekeeper, shows how the honey bee was one of the first symbols of colonization and how bees' societal structures have shaped our ideals about work, family, community, and leisure.

Sweet Stuff

An American History of Sweeteners from Sugar to Sucralose

Sweet Stuff

A history of sugar consumption and the role of sugar in everyday American life chronicles the stories of major natural sweeteners from molasses and corn syrup to honey and maple as well as major artificial sweeteners, placing sugar in a context of diet, science and politics.

Biological Diversity

Exploiters and Exploited

Biological Diversity

Biological Diversity takes a fresh, innovative approach to the teaching of biodiversity. Rather than detailing and cataloguing the major taxa and their evolutionary relationships, the authors have selected 18 groups of organisms and used these as a framework in which to discuss the species and their interactions with man and each other. There is a strong narrative theme throughout – the exploited and the exploiters - and, in many cases, there is emphasis on the historical context. A wide range of organisms are covered, from the unicellular to birds and mammals and with an equal consideration of plants and animals. Species have been chosen for their ability to best illustrate particular biological principles, and for their strong interaction with other species. After an introduction the book is divided into two parts: ‘Exploited’ and ‘Exploiters’. Each of the chapters, although linked to each other, forms a stand-alone essay. They are scientifically rigorous, up-to-date and do not shy away from addressing some controversial issues. Chapters have’ text boxes’ highlighting important issues and concepts, lists of further reading and references. In addition to tables and figures the book has a selection of original illustrations drawn by leading artist Steven Appleby. This fresh approach will appeal to all those interested in the biological sciences, and aims to be accessible to people with a diversity of backgrounds. It will prove particularly useful to biology students, enabling them to get to grips with important biological principles and concepts that underpin the diversity of life, and the interrelationship of humans with other groups of organisms.

How Food Made History

How Food Made History

Covering 5,000 years of global history, How Food Made History traces the changing patterns of food production and consumption that have molded economic and social life and contributed fundamentally to the development of government and complex societies. Charts the changing technologies that have increased crop yields, enabled the industrial processing and preservation of food, and made transportation possible over great distances Considers social attitudes towards food, religious prohibitions, health and nutrition, and the politics of distribution Offers a fresh understanding of world history through the discussion of food

Beeconomy

What Women and Bees Can Teach Us about Local Trade and the Global Market

Beeconomy

Queen bee. Worker bees. Busy as a bee. These phrases have shaped perceptions of women for centuries, but how did these stereotypes begin? Who are the women who keep bees and what can we learn from them? Beeconomy examines the fascinating evolution of the relationship between women and bees around the world. From Africa to Australia to Asia, women have participated in the pragmatic aspects of honey hunting and in the more advanced skills associated with beekeeping as hive technology has advanced through the centuries. Synthesizing the various aspects of hive-related products, such as beewax and cosmetics, as well as the more specialized skills of queen production and knowledge-based economies of research and science, noted bee expert Tammy Horn documents how and why women should consider being beekeepers. The women profiled in the book suggest ways of managing careers, gender discrimination, motherhood, marriage, and single-parenting—all while enjoying the community created by women who work with honey bees. Horn finds in beekeeping an opportunity for a new sustainable economy, one that takes into consideration environment, children, and family needs. Beeconomy not only explores globalization, food history, gender studies, and politics; it is a collective call to action.

Food, Culture and Identity in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age

Food, Culture and Identity in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age

Archaeology literally feeds on the residues and discarded remains of our ancestors' meals. Such material has spawned a vast field of research and scientific techniques looking at prehistoric diet and food so that we can now learn more about the residues found stuck to the bottom of a Bronze Age pot than what is at the bottom of our own freezers.

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Arts & humanities

Current Contents