The Wild Muir

Here is an entertaining collection of famed conservationist John Muir’s most exciting adventures in nature, representing some of his finest writing.

The Wild Muir

Here is an entertaining collection of John Muir’s most exciting adventures, representing some of his finest writing. From the famous avalanche ride off the rim of Yosemite Valley to his night spent weathering a windstorm at the top of a tree to death-defying falls on Alaskan glaciers, the renowned outdoorsman’s exploits are related in passages that are by turns exhilarating, unnerving, dizzying, and outrageous.

Journeys in the Wilderness

This new selection includes Muir's finest autobiographical books: The Story of My Boyhood and Youth and My First Summer in the Sierra along with the best of his climbing and conservation essays from: The Mountains of California, Our ...

Journeys in the Wilderness

The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in the east of Scotland in 1838, Muir is famed as the father of American conservation, and as the first person to promote the idea of National Parks.

The Wilderness World of John Muir

A collection of Muir's finest nature and environmental writings includes excerpts from all his major works, including Travels in Alaska and My First Summer in the Sierra.

The Wilderness World of John Muir

A collection of Muir's finest nature and environmental writings includes excerpts from all his major works, including Travels in Alaska and My First Summer in the Sierra. Reprint.

The Wilderness Essays

This meticulously edited John Muir collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Picturesque California The Mountains of California Our National Parks My First Summer in the Sierra The Yosemite ...

The Wilderness Essays

This meticulously edited John Muir collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Picturesque California The Mountains of California Our National Parks My First Summer in the Sierra The Yosemite Travels in Alaska Stickeen: The Story of a Dog The Cruise of the Corwin A Thousand-mile Walk to the Gulf Steep Trails Studies in Sierra The National Parks and Forest Reservations Save the Redwoods Snow-storm on Mount Shasta Features of the Proposed Yosemite National Park A Rival of the Yosemite The Treasures of the Yosemite Yosemite Glaciers Yosemite in Winter Yosemite in Spring Edward Henry Harriman Edward Taylor Parsons The Hetch Hetchy Valley The Grand Cañon of the Colorado

Wild Men

“To any place that is wild,” Muir replied. Muir suspected that the man thought he
might be crazy. He quickly directed Muir to take the ferry across the Bay to
Oakland, which he did; from there, he walked east across California's Great
Central ...

Wild Men

Documents the friendship between an early 20th-century founder of American anthropology and a last surviving Native American, describing Ishi's adaptation to modern city life while retaining his inherent culture and Kroeber's subsequent questioning of his profession and civilization.

Son of the Wilderness

This book, originally published in 1945 and based in large part on Wolfe's personal interviews with people who knew and worked with Muir, is one that could never be written again. It is, and will remain, the standard Muir biography.

Son of the Wilderness

Working closely with Muir's family and with his papers, Wolfe was able to create a full portrait of her subject, not only as America's firebrand conservationist and founder of the national park system, but also as husband, father, and friend. All readers who have admired Muir's ruggedly individualistic lifestyle, and those who wish a greater appreciation for the history of environmental preservation in America, will be enthralled and enlightened by this splendid biography. The story follows Muir from his ancestral home in Scotland, through his early years in the harsh Wisconsin wilderness, to his history-making pilgrimage to California. This book, originally published in 1945 and based in large part on Wolfe's personal interviews with people who knew and worked with Muir, is one that could never be written again. It is, and will remain, the standard Muir biography.

New Lives of the Saints

For Thoreau and Muir wild(er)ness, rather than the primitive or the barbarian with
their pejorative overtones, was distinct from civilization (Muir 1991, 2). In between
the wild(er)ness of mountainous national parks and the civilization of the cities ...

New Lives of the Saints

Presented here for the first time and for meditation and emulation are the words and work of many environmental apostles. The words and work of each apostle are designed to delight and inspire the reader to begin or continue to lead a life of environmental action for conservation and contemplation of nature for spiritual succor in the age of climate change. All the usual suspects are here, such as St. Francis, Rachel Carson, Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, and Judith Wright, but New Lives of the Saints emphasizes some aspects of their words and work often ignored or overlooked, such as Thoreau on swamps and Leopold on marshes. Also included are some unusual and unexpected environmental apostles, such as Walter Benjamin, Raymond Williams, Seamus Heaney, and Paul Virilio, all of whom contributed to green thinking as this book shows. Other environmentally apostolic writers, such as Walt Whitman, Sidney Lanier, Lord Dunsany, H. P. Lovecraft, Felix Guattari and Kelly Barnhill, are also discussed. Beginning with two environmentally and animal friendly retellings of the legends of St. George and St. Margaret involving dragons, the book goes on to devote a chapter each to ten other environmental apostles as patron saints of a special type of environment or of an approach to environmental conservation and contemplation. These saints sing the song of the earth, including its swamps, marshes, bogs, fens, national parks, mountains, forests, oceans, seas, airs, rivers, reefs, trees, cities, peoples, places, plants, animals, and so on. They provide nurture for living a life of hope and symbiotic livelihood living sacrally with the earth. New Lives of the Saints crosses the great divide between fiction and non-fiction and mixes the genres of story and essay. It is a ground-breaking work of environmental counter-theology for the symbiocene, the hoped-for age superseding the Anthropocene.

John Muir

John Muir is regarded as the 'father of America's national parks' and is a towering figure in the history of that country's involvement with ecology.

John Muir

John Muir is regarded as the 'father of America's national parks' and is a towering figure in the history of that country's involvement with ecology. Born into a harsh home in Dunbar, Scotland he would often escape to revel in the birds and wildlife of the area. When his father suddenly uprooted the family and moved to the United States, the oppression he associated with his childhood continued - and so did his involvement with the natural world. Despite the difficulty of his formative years Muir grew up to be a man of great joy - first an inventor and then an explorer, he found his haven in the mountains of Sierra Nevada. He was a fascinating character: on the one hand a recluse, who sought solitude, and on the other a passionate activist, determined to save the places he loved. A strong believer in both God and the essential goodness of humanity, he was the founder and first president of the Sierra Club. This wonderful memoir pays tribute to a giant of ecology and is essential reading for lovers of natural history.

John Muir

These books by John Muir were primary sources for quotations, philosophies,
ideas, background, and context: My First Summer ... The Wild Muir. Selected and
introduced by Lee Stetson. Yosemite National Park: Yosemite Association, 1994.

John Muir

In 1849, 11-year-old John Muir immigrated from Scotland to America. Here, he rose from farmer and sawmill worker to become a noted authority on the botany, glaciers, and forestry of the nation's wilderness. Best known for his long association with the Yosemite Valley and Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, Muir also explored, mostly afoot, the southern States, Alaska, the Great Basin, and the Mojave Desert. His studies of nature took him around the world and generated volumes of poetic, evocative writings. As America expanded relentlessly westward, Muir witnessed the plunder and exploitation of the land and became a driving force in efforts to protect the natural world. A modest and private man, married and father of two doting daughters, his conservationist views forced him into battle with powerful political and industrial interests. Some battles he won, influencing four US Presidents to sponsor legislation that protected forests and established or expanded America's national parks. Muir lost his last, and perhaps most personal battle. He fought until near the end of his life to prevent the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park from becoming a reservoir for the city of San Francisco. Some of his conservationsist friends believed the conflict so sapped his physical, emotional, and spiritual strength that it contributed to his death. Remembered as the founder of the Sierra Club, father of America's conservation movement, and architect of a still growing wilderness ethic, Muir set an example many still follow, fighting today's threats to the environment. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Wilderness Journeys

This collection, including the never-before-published Stickeen, presents the finest of Muir's writings, and imparts a rounded portrait of a man whose generosity, passion, discipline and vision are an inspiration to this day.

The Wilderness Journeys

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe." —John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra The name of John Muir has come to stand for the protection of wild land and wilderness in both America and Britain. Born in Dunbar in 1838, Muir is famed as the father of American conservation. This collection, including the rarely-seen Stickeen, presents the finest of Muir's writings, and imparts a rounded portrait of a man whose generosity, passion, discipline, and vision are an inspiration to this day. Combining acute observation with a sense of inner discovery, Muir's writings of his travels though some of the greatest landscapes on Earth, including the Carolinas, Florida, Alaska, and those lands which were to become the great National Parks of Yosemite and the Sierra Valley, raise an awareness of nature to a spiritual dimension. These journals provide a unique marriage of natural history with lyrical prose and often amusing anecdotes, retaining a freshness, intensity, and brutal honesty which will amaze the modern reader. Introduced by Graham White.