The Vagina Monologues

The Vagina Monologues

Drawing on conversations with hundreds of women about their genitalia, the author presents a collection of performance pieces from her one-woman show of the same name.

St Mary's Catholic School Presents the Vagina Monologues

St Mary's Catholic School Presents the Vagina Monologues

Hilarious, bold, sparky and surprising, this is the funniest feminist book you'll read all year. Alex is a rebel from the tip of her purple fauxhawk to the toes of her biker boots. She's tried everything she can to get expelled from her strict Catholic boarding school. Now, Alex has a new plan. Tired of the sexism she sees in every corner of St Mary's, Alex decides to stage the school's first ever production of The Vagina Monologues. Which is a challenge, as no one else at St Mary's can even bear to say the word 'vagina' out loud . . .

Women's Rights: People and Perspectives

People and Perspectives

Women's Rights: People and Perspectives

A lively, accessible collection of essays exploring the history of the struggle for women's rights in the United States from the colonial period to the present. • Primary sources, including the 1692 witchcraft examination of Bridget Bishop; an excerpt from a 1917 National American Woman Suffrage Organization document, "Why Women Should Vote; " and excerpts from "School Days of an Indian Girl by Zitkala-Sa" • Each chapter contains sidebars for more in-depth coverage and an annotated bibliograpy offers information on scholarly works for further research

Facs - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

Facs - Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies

The editors of the Florida Atlantic Comparative Studies literary journal invite submissions on any topic for upcoming issues. FACS is an interdisciplinary journal providing a forum for comparative study in the arts, humanities, language, culture and social sciences. Past topics have included:* exploring representations of catastrophe * performing culture

The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History

The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History

From South Park to Kathy Acker, and from Lars Von Trier to Sex and the City, women's sexual organs are demonized. Rees traces the fascinating evolution of this demonization, considering how calling the 'c-word' obscene both legitimates and perpetuates the fractured identities of women globally. Rees demonstrates how writers, artists, and filmmakers contend with the dilemma of the vagina's puzzlingly 'covert visibility'. In our postmodern, porn-obsessed culture, vaginas appear to be everywhere, literally or symbolically but, crucially, they are as silenced as they are objectified. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History examines the paradox of female genitalia through five fields of artistic expression: literature, film, TV, visual, and performance art. There is a peculiar paradox – unlike any other – regarding female genitalia. Rees focuses on this paradox of what is termed the 'covert visibility' of the vagina and on its monstrous manifestations. That is, what happens when the female body refuses to be pathologized, eroticized, or rendered subordinate to the will or intention of another? Common, and often offensive, slang terms for the vagina can be seen as an attempt to divert attention away from the reality of women's lived sexual experiences such that we don't 'look' at the vagina itself – slang offers a convenient distraction to something so taboo. The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History is an important contribution to the ongoing debate in understanding the feminine identity

Lady Parts

Biblical Women and The Vagina Monologues

Lady Parts

How might women in the Bible tell their stories if they were prompted to do so by Eve Ensler's controversial play, The Vagina Monologues? This collection imagines some answers to that question. The monologues herein are written by a variety of authors, including scholars, undergraduates, clergy, and laywomen; the content of the narratives reflects this variety, being at times faithful or irreverent, tragic or even funny. All seek to give twenty-first-century voices to women in canonical texts--including the Hebrew Bible, Deuterocanonical books, and New Testament--who are often speechless, nameless, or otherwise marginalized. Not for the faint of heart, these monologues not only end the silences but also add flesh and bone to characters whose experiences have too easily been justified, metaphorized, or altogether ignored. By naming the torn places in these women's stories, this volume invites readers to encounter both the biblical characters and their contemporary interpreters with an attitude of compassionate listening. Our hope is that such compassionate listening may contribute not only to more just readings of sacred texts, but also to the mission of Eve Ensler and V-Day to end global violence against women and girls.

Illness in the Academy

A Collection of Pathographies by Academics

Illness in the Academy

Illness in the Academy investigates the deep-seated, widespread belief among academics and medical professionals that lived experiences outside the workplace should not be sacrificed to the ideal of objectivity those academic and medical professions so highly value. The 47 selections in this collection illuminate how academics bring their intellectual and creative tools, skills, and perspectives to bear on experiences of illness. The selections cross genres as well as bridge disciplines and cultures.

A Penis Manologue

One Man's Response to the Vagina Monologues

A Penis Manologue

Content in this book was banned from a college classroom-the same college classroom that required the reading of The Vagina Monologues. Ironically, it was in that class that this book was inspired. After reading Eve Ensler' book, The Vagina Monologues, Joe DiBuduo wanted to show a male's point of view to the subjects mentioned in Ensler's book. He planned to write a screenplay and call it, The Penis Chronicles. After handing out a questionnaire to a multitude of people who said they would participate, Joe received only one response. The Penis Chronicles couldn't be written with only his and another man's responses. He then realized how reticent most men, and even a college instructor, were to talk about penises. At that point he felt obligated to write his own attitude about the male appendage. So, he ended up with one monologue-his own-one man-a manologue. Free sample chapters at http://www.apenismanologue.com

Jesuit and Feminist Education

Intersections in Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-first Century

Jesuit and Feminist Education

Given its long tradition of authentic dialogue with other religious and philosophical perspectives, Jesuit education is uniquely suited to address the range of opportunities and challenges teachers and students face in the twenty-first century. At first glance, Jesuit and feminist ways of understanding the world appear to be antagonistic approaches to teaching and learning. But much can be gained by focusing on how feminism, in dialogue with Jesuit education, can form, inform, and transform each other, our institutions, and the people in them. Both traditions are committed to educating the whole person by integrating reason and emotion. Both also argue for connecting theory and practice and applying knowledge in context. As unabashedly value-driven educational approaches, both openly commit to social justice and an end to oppression in its many forms. With strong humanistic roots, Jesuit and feminist education alike promote the liberal arts as critical to developing engaged citizens of the world. This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on intersectionality, a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, the volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian pedagogy, a five-hundred year old humanistic tradition, and more recent feminist theory in order to explore how educators might find strikingly similar methods that advocate common goals--including engaging with issues such as race, gender, diversity, and social justice. By reflecting on these shared perspectives and inherent differences from both practical and theoretical approaches, the contributors of this volume initiate a dynamic dialogue about Jesuit and feminist education that will enliven and impact our campuses for years to come.