The Unfinished Palazzo

Individually sensational and collectively remarkable, these stories of modern Venice tell us much about the ways women chose to live in the 20th century.

The Unfinished Palazzo

Abandoned unfinished and left to rot on Venice's Grand Canal, 'il palazzo non finito' was once an unloved guest among the aristocrats of Venetian architecture. Yet in the 20th century it played host to three passionate and unconventional women who would take the city by storm. The staggeringly wealthy Marchesa Luisa Casati made her new home a belle epoque aesthete's fantasy and herself a living work of art; notorious British socialite Doris Castlerosse (née Delevingne) welcomed film stars and royalty to glittering parties between the wars; and American heiress Peggy Guggenheim amassed an exquisite collection of modern art, which today draws visitors from around the world. Each in turn used the Unfinished Palazzo as a stage on which to re-fashion her life, with a dazzling supporting cast ranging from D'Annunzio and Nijinsky, through Noël Coward, Winston Churchill and Cecil Beaton, to Yoko Ono. Individually sensational and collectively remarkable, these stories of modern Venice tell us much about the ways women chose to live in the 20th century.

The Unfinished Palazzo Life Love and Art in Venice The Stories of Luisa Casati Doris Castlerosse and Peggy Guggenheim

The story of Venice’s “Unfinished Palazzo”— told through the lives of three of its most unconventional, passionate, and fascinating residents: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim Commissioned in 1750, the Palazzo ...

The Unfinished Palazzo  Life  Love and Art in Venice  The Stories of Luisa Casati  Doris Castlerosse and Peggy Guggenheim

The story of Venice’s “Unfinished Palazzo”— told through the lives of three of its most unconventional, passionate, and fascinating residents: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim Commissioned in 1750, the Palazzo Venier was planned as a testimony to the power and wealth of a great Venetian family, but the fortunes of the Veniers waned midconstruction and the project was abandoned. Empty, unfinished, and decaying, the building was considered an eyesore until the early twentieth century when it attracted and inspired three women at key moments in their lives: Luisa Casati, Doris Castlerosse, and Peggy Guggenheim. Luisa Casati turned her home into an aesthete’s fantasy where she hosted parties as extravagant and decadent as Renaissance court operas, spending small fortunes on her own costumes in her quest to become a “living work of art” and muse. Doris Castlerosse strove to make her mark in London and Venice during the glamorous, hedonistic interwar years, hosting film stars and royalty at glittering parties. In the postwar years, Peggy Gugenheim turned the Palazzo into a model of modernist simplicity that served as a home for her exquisite collection of modern art that today draws tourists and art lovers from around the world. Each vivid life story is accompanied by previously unseen materials from family archives, weaving an intricate history of these legendary art world eccentrics.

Architecture in Italy 1500 1600

PALAZZI IN VERONA Sanmicheli's palazzo facades recall the scheme of
Bramantc's Palazzo Caprini. ... earlier; building was in progress in 1533/' The
date of the unfinished Palazzo Bevilacqua can only be determined on stylistic
grounds.

Architecture in Italy  1500 1600

This classic work presents a stimulating survey of the most exciting and innovative period in the history of architecture. Lotz also goes beyond the more familiar locations, architects and buildings to conquer less well-known territories, exploring Piedmont and Vitozzi and ending with a study of bizzarrie.

Art and Architecture in Italy 1250 1400

THE PALAZZO CoMUNAL E At PIA CENZA The final flowering of the Lombard
Arengario or Broletto is achieved in the unfinished Palazzo Comunale of
Piacenza on the Emilian border [32]. The building was begun in 1280 at the order
of ...

Art and Architecture in Italy 1250 1400

The 14th century in Italian art is a very rich one, and Professor White's book gives architecture equal weight with painting and sculpture. The story of the Gothic style and the prehistory of the Renaissance is given: all the facts are related, but also the works of art are described with insight and for their own sakes, and not simply as data for fitting into schemes and theories. Among the great names are those of Arnolfo di Cambio, the Pisani, Cavallini, Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; among the buildings S. Croce, S. Maria Novella, the cathedral and the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, and the cathedrals of Siena, Orvieto, and Milan, as well as churches, castles, and civic buildings from the Val d'Aosta to Sicily. The third edition of this work includes colour illustrations and incorporates textual revisions and an updated bibliography.

Venice on Foot

700.—This is the site of the palace of the Venier dalle Torreselle (G. C. 223). (b) (
R) No. 701.—Garden of the unfinished Palazzo Venier (G. C. 222). N.B.—The
calle turns (L). 18. (R) FONDAMENTA VENIER. (a) (L, across the rio) Palazzo
Zorzi, ...

Venice on Foot

This early work on Venice is both expensive and hard to find in its first edition. It contains a travel guide to the sights of interest and Grand Canal routes through the city of Venice. This is a fascinating work and is thoroughly recommended for anyone with an interest in the history of Venice. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Lorenzo di Filippo Strozzi and Niccolo Machiavelli

He also refused to pay for his portion of the Palazzo Strozzi. ... Sadly, Alfonso
died in self-imposed exile in Naples in 1534, still unwilling to pay his brothers,
who were forced to continue the litigation, as it pertained to the unfinished
palazzo, ...

Lorenzo di Filippo Strozzi and Niccolo Machiavelli

By 1520, Niccolò Machiavelli’s life in Florence was steadily improving: he had achieved a degree of literary fame, and, following his removal from the Florentine Chancery by the Medici family, he had managed to gain their respect and patronage. But there is one figure whose substantial contributions to Machiavelli’s restoration has been hitherto neglected – Lorenzo di Filippo Strozzi (1482–1549), a younger and fabulously wealthy Florentine nobleman. As manuscript evidence suggests, Strozzi brought Machiavelli into his patronage network and aided many of his post-1520 achievements. This book is the first English biography of Strozzi, as well as the first examination of the patron-client relationship that developed between the two men. William J. Landon reveals Strozzi’s influence on Machiavelli through wide-ranging textual investigations, and especially through Strozzi’s Pistola fatta per la peste – a work that survives as a Machiavelli autograph, and for which Landon has provided the first ever complete English translation and critical edition.

Rossini

... at the Teatro Comunale, the Rossinis took up winter residence in the still not
completely renovated palazzo in Bologna. ... ularly on his return to Bologna,
when lack of space in the unfinished palazzo obliged him lodge in a local
pensione.

Rossini

Gioachino Rossini was one of the most influential, as well as one of the most industrious and emotionally complex of the great nineteenth-century composers. Between 1810 and 1829, he wrote 39 operas, a body of work, comic and serious, which transformed Italian opera and radically altered the course of opera in France. His retirement from operatic composition in 1829, at the age of 37, was widely assumed to be the act of a talented but lazy man. In reality, political events and a series of debilitating illnesses were the determining factors. After drafting the Stabat Mater in 1832, Rossini wrote no music of consequence for the best part of twenty-five years, before the clouds lifted and he began composing again in Paris in the late 1850s. During this glorious Indian summer of his career, he wrote 150 songs and solo piano pieces his 'Sins of Old Age' and his final masterpiece, the Petite Messe solennelle. The image of Rossini as a gifted but feckless amateur-the witty, high-spirited bon vivant who dashed off The Barber of Seville in a mere thirteen days-persisted down the years, until the centenary of his death in 1968 inaugurated a process of re-evaluation by scholars, performers, and writers. The original 1985 edition of Richard Osborne's pioneering and widely acclaimed Rossini redefined the life and provided detailed analyses of the complete Rossini oeuvre. Twenty years on, all Rossini's operas have been staged and recorded, a Critical Edition of his works is well advanced, and a scholarly edition of his correspondence, including 250 previously unknown letters from Rossini to his parents, is in progress. Drawing on these past two decades of scholarship and performance, this new edition of Rossini provides the most detailed portrait we have yet had of one of the worlds best-loved and most enigmatic composers.

Killing the Moonlight

(“Notes for CXVII et seq.”/821) In The Cantos, the carved always communicates
with surrounding hollows: solid “sculpture” corresponds through voids such as
those of the unfinished Palazzo Venier dei Leoni to which this passage returns,
and ...

Killing the Moonlight

As a city that seems to float between Europe and Asia, removed by a lagoon from the tempos of terra firma, Venice has long seduced the Western imagination. Since the 1797 fall of the Venetian Republic, fantasies about the sinking city have engendered an elaborate series of romantic clichés, provoking conflicting responses: some modern artists and intellectuals embrace the resistance to modernity manifest in Venice's labyrinthine premodern form and temporality, whereas others aspire to modernize by "killing the moonlight" of Venice, in the Futurists' notorious phrase. Spanning the history of literature, art, and architecture—from John Ruskin, Henry James, and Ezra Pound to Manfredo Tafuri, Italo Calvino, Jeanette Winterson, and Robert Coover—Killing the Moonlight tracks the pressures that modernity has placed on the legacy of romantic Venice, and the distinctive strains of aesthetic invention that resulted from the clash. In Venetian incarnations of modernism, the anachronistic urban fabric and vestigial sentiment that both the nation-state of Italy and the historical avant-garde would cast off become incompletely assimilated parts of the new. Killing the Moonlight brings Venice into the geography of modernity as a living city rather than a metaphor for death, and presents the archipelago as a crucible for those seeking to define and transgress the conceptual limits of modernism. In strategic detours from the capitals of modernity, the book redrafts the confines of modernist culture in both geographical and historical terms.

Rome of the Renaissance

Antonio da Sangallo the Younger: Corner of the Palazzo Farnese. Bramante:
Base of the unfinished Palazzo dei Tribunali. Corner of an unfinished palazzo,
Via dei Banchi Vecchi. Corner of a sixteenth-century building, Via de' Funari.
Base of ...

Rome of the Renaissance