The Tudor Reformation

The Tudor Reformation

The Reformation transformed England forever. From peasants in the lanes and fields to the court of Henry VIII, no life was left untouched as the Roman Catholic Church was replaced as the centre of the nation's religious life. Emerging from a dense mesh of European ecclesiastical and political controversy and Tudor dynastic ambition, the English Reformation ended with the Pope supplanted as the head of the national church, the great monasteries -owners of much of the country's land-disbanded and destroyed, the Latin Mass replaced by vernacular services and the colourful wall paintings of parish churches whitewashed. This is a fully illustrated introduction that looks at the main players-Thomas Cranmer, Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and others-as well as the broad sweep of this era of bitter controversy, brutal persecution and seismic upheaval.

The English Reformation Revised

The English Reformation Revised

The new Conclusion tries to plug some of the remaining gaps, and suggests how the Reformation came to divide the English nation. It is a deliberately controversial collection, to be used alongside existing textbooks and to promote rethinking and debate.

Ireland in the Age of the Tudors, 1447-1603

English Expansion and the End of Gaelic Rule

Ireland in the Age of the Tudors, 1447-1603

The second edition of Steven Ellis's formidable work represents not only a survey, but also a critique of traditional perspectives on the making of modern Ireland. It explores Ireland both as a frontier society divided between English and Gaelic worlds, and also as a problem of government within the wider Tudor state. This edition includes two major new chapters: the first extending the coverage back a generation, to assess the impact on English Ireland of the crisis of lordship that accompanied the Lancastrian collapse in France and England; and the second greatly extending the material on the Gaelic response to Tudor expansion.

The Tudor Occupation of Boulogne

Conquest, Colonisation and Imperial Monarchy, 1544–1550

The Tudor Occupation of Boulogne

Sheds fresh light on our understanding of violence, imperialism, and political centralisation in Tudor England.

Propaganda and the Tudor State

Political Culture in the Westcountry

Propaganda and the Tudor State

This book offers a fresh understanding of the substance behind the rhetoric of English Renaissance monarchy. Propaganda is identified as a key factor in the intensification of the English state. The Tudor royal image is pursued in all its forms: in print and prayer, in iconography andarchitecture. The monarchy surrounded itself with the trappings of majesty at court, but in the shires it relied on different strategies of persuasion to uphold its authority. The Reformation placed the provincial pulpit at the disposal of the crown, and the church became the main conduit of royalpropaganda. Sermons taught the duty of obedience, and parish prayer was redirected from local saints towards the sovereign as the symbolic core of the nation.Dr Cooper examines the relationship between the Tudor monarchy and its subjects in Cornwall and Devon, and the complex interaction between local and national political culture. These were years of social and religious upheaval, during which the western peninsula witnessed three major rebellions,and many more riots and affrays. A vibrant popular religion was devastated by the Protestant Reformation, and foreign invasion was a frequent threat. Cornwall remained recognizably different from England in its ancient language and traditions. Yet in the midst of all this, popular allegiance tomonarchy and nation survived and prospered. The Tudors were mourned and celebrated in towns and parish churches. Loyalty was fostered by the Duchy of Cornwall and the stannaries. Regional difference, far from undermining the power of the crown, was fundamental to its success in the westcountry.This is a study of government at the dangerous edges of Tudor England, and a testament to the unifying power of propaganda.

The Tudor Constitution

Documents and Commentary

The Tudor Constitution

Review of the first edition:"There can be no doubt whatever that his work will, through its merits, become the standard student's book on the Tudor Constitution." Law Quarterly Review

Religion and Reformation in the Tudor Diocese of Meath

Religion and Reformation in the Tudor Diocese of Meath

This book charts the attempts made to introduce religious reforms into the diocese of Meathduring the th century. The study opens with an investigation of the towns of Meath and adiscussion of religion in the pre-reformation period. This is followed by a narrative of thereform initiatives introduced into the diocese and a discussion of the careers of three Tudorbishops there, which demonstrate the failure of religious reform in th-century Meath. Another chapter discusses the financial state of the Tudor church in Meath and the effect whichthis had on the suitability of the clergy there. The dissolution of the monasteries is investigated, along with the covert resistance which some of the dissolution commissions encountered andthe fate of the dispossessed religious. The dissolutions freed up a vast amount of property whichlay in the gift of the crown to distribute among the gentry families of the Pale. The effect whichthis had upon the fortunes and religious outlook of both the nobility and gentry in th andearly th-century Meath is examined in the final chapter