The Top 256 Rules of Paleontology

Practical Advice for Fossil Technicians

The Top 256 Rules of Paleontology

You've read every dinosaur book that you could get your hands on since you were ten years old. You've dragged your friends and family to natural history museums all across the country. Maybe, you've been volunteering for digs or lab work. Maybe you've already gotten your degree or even your first job in the field. Whatever the case, if you are chasing the beasts of life's past, and you know that paleontology is what you want to do for the rest of your life, then "The Top 256 Rules of Paleontology" should be the next step in your journey. The Top 256 offers introductory fossil technicians, volunteers and young professionals over 256 practical, candid, no holds-barred, tidbits of advice on how to make that journey a success. It covers everything from field and laboratory techniques, to advice on publishing, dealing with your peers and conducting research. If you're a young professional, an old pro or just someone interested in fossils, this book is a must read!

Imago Dei: Man/Woman Created in the Image of God

Implications for Theology, Pastoral Care, Eucharist, Apologetics, Aesthetics

Imago Dei: Man/Woman Created in the Image of God

The question "What is human nature?" is in vogue today. Like everything else, this concept is being deconstructed in the context of the reigning ideology of individualistic materialism. Is there a fixed human nature, or is this simply a manipulatable social construct with no objective reference? This book says: "Yes, there is: the imago Dei: man/woman created in the image of God." Hobson argues that this text from Genesis 1:26-28 is a God-given anthropological revelation that establishes the relational bond of human beings with their Creator and also with his creation, for which the imago equips us to be responsible stewards. Many of Hobson's essays were delivered as talks in parishes. They explore from multiple angles the import of the imago Dei for theological and sacramental reflection, apologetics, aesthetics, art, and, at a hands-on practical level, for pastoral counseling and inner healing. His texts, one of which opens with a discussion of genocide, contain incisive critiques of the dark side of modernity alongside wide-ranging demonstrations of the pertinence of the imago Dei to the current debates about human dignity and rights. His book is a ringing call to the church to take the measure of the value of this anthropological revelation for its proclamation of the gospel.

Science and the Myth of Progress

Science and the Myth of Progress

In the wake of the fall / Frithjof Schuon -- Sacred and profane science / René Guénon -- Traditional cosmology and the modern world / Titus Burckhardt -- Religion and science / Lord Northbourne -- Contemporary man, between the rim and the axis / Seyyed Hossein Nasr -- Christianity and the religious thought of C.G. Jung / Philip Sherrard - - On earth as it is in heaven / James S. Cutsinger -- The nature and extent of criticism of evolutionary theory / Osman Bakar -- Knowledge and knowledge / D.M. Matheson -- Knowledge and its counterfeits / Gai Eaton -- Ignorance / Wendell Berry -- The plague of scientistic belief / Wolfgang Smith -- Scientism: the bedrock of the modern worldview / Huston Smith -- Life as non-historical reality / Giuseppe Sermonti -- Man, creation and the fossil record / Michael Robert Negus -- The act of creation: bridging transcendence and immanence / William A. Dembski.

Encyclopedia of Biology

Encyclopedia of Biology

Contains approximately 800 alphabetical entries, prose essays on important topics, line illustrations, and black-and-white photographs.

The Bare Bones

An Unconventional Evolutionary History of the Skeleton

The Bare Bones

What can we learn about the evolution of jaws from a pair of scissors? How does the flight of a tennis ball help explain how fish overcome drag? What do a spacesuit and a chicken egg have in common? Highlighting the fascinating twists and turns of evolution across more than 540 million years, paleobiologist Matthew Bonnan uses everyday objects to explain the emergence and adaptation of the vertebrate skeleton. What can camera lenses tell us about the eyes of marine reptiles? How does understanding what prevents a coffee mug from spilling help us understand the posture of dinosaurs? The answers to these and other intriguing questions illustrate how scientists have pieced together the history of vertebrates from their bare bones. With its engaging and informative text, plus more than 200 illustrative diagrams created by the author, The Bare Bones is an unconventional and reader-friendly introduction to the skeleton as an evolving machine.

Science

Science

Vols. for 1911-13 contain the Proceedings of the Helminothological Society of Washington, ISSN 0018-0120, 1st-15th meeting.