The Subversive Stitch

Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine

The Subversive Stitch

Rozsika Parker's now classic re-evaluation of the reciprocal relationship between women and embroidery has brought stitchery out from the private world of female domesticity into the fine arts, created a major breakthrough in art history and criticism, and fostered the emergence of today's dynamic and expanding crafts movements. "The Subversive Stitch" is now available again with a new Introduction that brings the book up to date with exploration of the stitched art of Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin, as well as the work of new young female and male embroiderers. Rozsika Parker uses household accounts, women's magazines, letters, novels and the works of art themselves to trace through history how the separation of the craft of embroidery from the fine arts came to be a major force in the marginalisation of women's work. Beautifully illustrated, her book also discusses the contradictory nature of women's experience of embroidery: how it has inculcated female subservience while providing an immensely pleasurable source of creativity, forging links between women.

The Subversive Stitch

Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine

The Subversive Stitch

Rozsika Parker's re-evaluation of the reciprocal relationship between women and embroidery has brought stitchery out from the private world of female domesticity into the fine arts, created a major breakthrough in art history and criticism, and fostered the emergence of today's dynamic and expanding crafts movements. 'The Subversive Stitch' is now available again with a new Introduction that brings the book up to date with exploration of the stitched art of Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin, as well as the work of new young female and male embroiderers. Rozsika Parker uses household accounts, women's magazines, letters, novels and the works of art themselves to trace through history how the separation of the craft of embroidery from the fine arts came to be a major force in the marginalisation of women's work. Beautifully illustrated, her book also discusses the contradictory nature of women's experience of embroidery: how it has inculcated female subservience while providing an immensely pleasurable source of creativity, forging links between women. "A book wonderfully rich, not only in information, but in people and ideas." - 'Guardian' "A marvellously written and illustrated book." - 'Times Educational Supplement'

Queering the Subversive Stitch

Men and the Culture of Needlework

Queering the Subversive Stitch

In Queering the Subversive Stitch, Joseph McBrinn uses Queer Theory to address the history of men's relationship with needlecrafts, to 'queer' the narratives and contest widely-held assumptions that perpetuate misogynistic and homophobic ideas. Thirty years after Rozsika Parker published her seminal work on embroidery and the making of the feminine, McBrinn argues that, in fact, men have engaged with needlework throughout history, yet such activities have become stigmatized over the past two hundred years, even shameful. As a result, needlework can be – and often is – used by men as a means of deviance and subversion, many historical and contemporary examples of which are explored in this book. From Ernest Thesiger's public embroidering that shocked society in interwar London, to David Wojnarowicz sewing his mouth shut in 1980s New York to draw attention to the censorship of gay artists and art about AIDS, McBrinn illustrates the importance of needlework produced by men in understanding history, identity, emotions and agency.

New Feminist Art Criticism

Critical Strategies

New Feminist Art Criticism

The artist, the critic and the academic: feminism's problematic relationship with 'Theory'/ Janet Wolff -- Preaching to the converted? Feminist art publishing in the 1980s / Frances Borzello -- The sphinx contemplating Napoleon : black women artists in Britain / Gilane Tawadros -- Reading between the lines: the imprinted spaces of Sutapa Biswas / Moira Roth -- Modernism, art education and sexual difference /Pen Dalton -- Eyewitnesses, not spectators/activists, not academics: feminist pedagogy and women's creativity / Val A. Walsh -- Exhibiting strategies / Debbie Duffin -- The situation of women curators / Elizabeth A. MacGregor -- Afterthoughts on curating 'The subversive stitch' / Pennina Barnett -- The cult of the individual / Fran Cottell -- On women dealers in the art world / Maureen Paley -- Where do we draw the line? An investigation into the censorship of art / Anna Douglas --Women's movements: feminism, censorship and performance art / Sally Dawson -- Why have there been no great women pornagraphers? / Naomi Salaman -- Just jamming: Irigaray, painting and psychoanalysis / Christine Battersby -- Border crossing: womanliness, body, repre-sentation / Hilary Robinson -- (P)age 49: on the subject of history / Mary Kelly -- Models of painting practice: too much body? / Joan Key --Text and textiles: weaving across the borderlines / Janis Jefferies --Kinda art, sorta tapestry ... / Ann Newdigate -- Sewn constructions / Dinah Prentice -- Penelope and the unravelling of history / Ruth Scheuing.

Extra/Ordinary

Craft and Contemporary Art

Extra/Ordinary

Artists, critics, curators, and scholars develop theories of craft in relation to art, chronicle how fine art institutions understand and exhibit craft media, and offer accounts of activist crafting.

Pictorial Embroidery in England

A Critical History of Needlepainting and Berlin Work

Pictorial Embroidery in England

The little-known art of Berlin Work was once the most commonly practiced art form among European women. Pictorial Embroidery in England is the first academic study of both pictorial Berlin Work and its precursor, needlepainting, exploring their cultural status in the 18th and 19th centuries. From enlightenment practices of copying to the development of an industrial aesthetic and the making of the modern amateur, Berlin Work developed as an official knowledge associated with notions of cultural and scientific progress. However, with the advent of the Arts and Crafts movement and modernist aesthetics, Berlin Work was gradually demoted to a craft hobby. Delving into the social, cultural and economic context of English pictorial embroidery, Pictorial Embroidery in England recovers Berlin Work as an art form, and demonstrates how this overlooked practice was once at the centre of cultural life.

Girlhood of Shakespeare's Sisters

Girlhood of Shakespeare's Sisters

The first book-length study of the way the literature and drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries constructed the category of the 'girl'.

Subversive Cross Stitch Coloring and Activity Book

40 Ways to Stop Freaking Out

Subversive Cross Stitch Coloring and Activity Book

Bestselling creator of Subversive Cross Stitch Julie Jackson brings her unique brand of snark to the Subversive Cross Stitch Coloring and Activity Book, with 40 fun activities (for grown-ups only.) Bonus bookmark included! For the first time, Julie Jackson’s sassy cross-stitch designs are available in coloring book form. Julie doesn’t hold back and neither should you. An adult activity book that collects her signature "charmingly disgruntled" patterns into the ultimate therapy--coloring pages--plus connect-the-dots, finish-the-doodle, and a host of other fun activities, this is the perfect opportunity to color your blues away and channel your inner badass with the Subversive Cross Stitch Coloring Book Feeling overloaded and underwhelmed? Try a subversive activity instead of freaking out. Practice mindlessness while you color one of Julie’s trademark cross-stitch designs (brilliantly reinterpreted by subversive illustrator Chris Piascik.) Or improve a bad mood with an in-your-face activity such as folding the “Flying F*ck” paper airplane or the handy Decision-Maker Cube. If it’s kindness that gets you through the day, make an “Everyday Valentine” for someone who deserves it. This book gives you permission to cut loose. This is not a book you put on the shelf and leave in perfect condition; it’s meant to be wildly interactive. So color outside the lines, cut parts out, fold, and throw things—tear it up and make it your own! No one else brings the same frustrations and creative attitude to it that you do. Consider it your therapy project and an escape from the pressures of the day. Most importantly, SHARE. Share the results with co-workers by adding your boss’s face to a finger puppet. Unleash your inner futurist with the magic cat fortune-teller. Or color and tear out one of the illustrated phrases to hang at your desk and remind you to smile now and then. Go ahead and turn your world upside down for a while. Release the therapeutic value of play and be the bad kid in class you always wanted to be. Color on the walls! There are no consequences here. Embrace the delicious thrill of so-called “bad” words (no one is shocked anymore.) By coloring them in, you take away their power. And really, f*ck anyone who can’t take a joke. Above all, have fun! Tear it up!