The Relaxed Rabbit

Massage for Your Pet Bunny

The Relaxed Rabbit

Professional massage and bodywork provides great health and wellness benefits. Why not extend this to our animal friends? In The Relaxed Rabbit: Massage for Your Pet Bunny, professional Massage Therapist Chandra Moira Beal and her mini-lop rabbit, Maia, share basic massage strokes specifically designed for pet rabbits. They offer the layperson a step-by-step routine to practice on companion rabbits at home. No experience is necessary to share the joy of massage with your pets. The Relaxed Rabbit: Helps rabbits with behavioral issues Increases range of motion Reduces tension, inflammation, and pain Improves circulation Accelerates recovery Strengthens immunity A safe and natural supplement to your rabbit's health care! Through dozens of photos and illustrations, you'll learn: How to massage your rabbit from "nose to toes" Basic anatomy and physiology How to address specific health and behavior issues Tips for getting the most from your sessions Massage is also a great way to deepen your relationship with your pets, as touching strengthens the animal-human bond. Stroking a pet can even lower your blood pressure, increase self-esteem, and establish a feeling of well-being. Animal massage is a win-win prospect. Get started today!

A House Rabbit Primer

Understanding and Caring for Your Companion Rabbit

A House Rabbit Primer

A House Rabbit Primer: Understanding and Caring for Your Companion Rabbit is a complete, up-to-date handbook on all aspects of rabbit care for both new and experienced pet rabbit owners. Just a few years ago, most pet rabbits were kept outdoors in hutches. That time is past. Today, pet rabbits are considered to be members of the family. They are spayed/neutered pets kept indoors and pampered with special toys and treats. In A House Rabbit Primer, author Lucile C. Moore, Ph.D., provides pet rabbit owners with valuable information about the total care of their pet. Part one tells owners just what to expect from their new member of the family and gives detailed information on how to house, feed, and train a rabbit. Part two contains a comprehensive medical section. In addition to detailed information on many rabbit diseases, there are tips on creating a first-aid kit for rabbits as well as providing emergency care. With more and more pet owners choosing to keep their rabbits indoors full time, this informative guide lays out practical information for making rabbits a healthy part of any family.

Rabbit Health in the 21st Century

A Guide for Bunny Parents

Rabbit Health in the 21st Century

This user-friendly book on pet rabbit health from a caretaker's perspective is written for people with little or no medical or veterinary background. Its goal is to help rabbit owners play a more active, informed role in their rabbit's health care decisions. It should never substitute for a trip to the veterinarian! The book's predecessor, Rabbit Health 101, received a favorable review in Exotic DVM Veterinary Magazine. The revised edition incorporates feedback from veterinarians across the country and includes the latest information for the new millennium. Topics include: Choosing and establishing a relationship with a veterinarian Symptoms and safe treatment options for a variety of conditions Diagnostic tests and how to understand what they tell your veterinarian Drugs (prescription, over the counter, and supplements) Alternative medicine Coping with loss Resources and references Stories and pictures of rabbits from around the world are sprinkled throughout the book, adding personal touches to serious topics. By the time you have read the entire book you will feel that you know Smokey, who inspired the original Rabbit Health 101, and Murray, who contributed so much to this most recent update.

When Your Rabbit Needs Special Care

Traditional and Alternative Healing Methods

When Your Rabbit Needs Special Care

When Your Rabbit Needs Special Care is an illustrated guide to the care and behavior of rabbits with special needs. The book provides information on topics as diverse as how to administer subcutaneous fluids to a rabbit and how sounds and color help promote healing. Quotes from top rabbit veterinarians and alternative healing practitioners from across the country are included, as are useful tips from rabbit owners who have had experience in dealing with particular medical conditions. The text is illustrated with both photographs and drawings, making it easy for readers to follow. Authors Lucile C. Moore and Kathy Smith provide pet owners with special-needs rabbits with information on basic care, pain control, digestive system problems, chronic illnesses, physically challenged rabbits, progressive disabilities causing mobility problems, dental care, elderbuns, and emotional issues.

Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents - E-Book

Clinical Medicine and Surgery

Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents - E-Book

A concise guide to the care of small mammals, Ferrets, Rabbits, and Rodents: Clinical Medicine and Surgery covers the conditions seen most often in veterinary practice. The book emphasizes preventive medicine along with topics including disease management, ophthalmology, dentistry, and zoonosis. More than 400 illustrations demonstrate key concepts related to radiographic interpretation, relevant anatomy, and diagnostic, surgical, and therapeutic techniques. Now in full color, this edition adds coverage of more surgical procedures and expands coverage of zoonotic disease. From editors Katherine Quesenberry and James W. Carpenter, along with a team of expert contributors, the "Pink Book" provides an authoritative, single source of information that is hard to find elsewhere. A logical organization makes it quick and easy to find important information, with each section devoted to a single animal and chapters within each section organized by body system. Over 400 photographs and illustrations highlight key concepts such as radiographic interpretation and the main points of diagnostic, surgical, and therapeutic techniques. A chapter on ophthalmology provides hard-to-find information on eye care for ferrets, rabbits, rodents, and other small mammals. Coverage of preventive medicine includes basic biology, husbandry, and routine care of the healthy animal. The drug formulary supplies dosage instructions for ferrets, rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas, hamsters, rats/mice, prairie dogs, hedgehogs, and sugar gliders. Chapter outlines offer at-a-glance overviews of the contents of each chapter. Handy tables and charts make it easy to find key information. Expanded Zoonotic Diseases chapter adds more depth along with the latest information on the rising potential for disease transmission to humans as exotic pets become more popular. Additional surgical procedures for each species are included, some with step-by-step instructions accompanied by color photographs and line drawings. Full-color images show the sometimes minute structures of these small animals and make accurate diagnoses easier, especially for lymphoproliferative diseases of rabbits, endoscopy, cytology, and hematology.

Rabbits For Dummies

Rabbits For Dummies

Your hands-on guide to being a responsible rabbit owner Want to raise a happy, healthy bunny? This practical guide gives you everything you need to know to successfully adopt, nurture, live with, and love a rabbit. From choosing a rabbit and preparing its home to training, healthcare, and having fun with your bunny, you get a wealth of expert tips that will have your rabbit (and you) hopping with joy! Jump into bunny basics — decide whether a rabbit is the right pet for you, discover the different breeds, and find out the best places to adopt your bunny Take care of creature comforts — from housing and grooming to feeding and healthcare, provide the best care for your friend Practice bunny "psychology" — understand bunny body language and sounds, handle behavior issues, and train your bunny to do tricks and use the litter box Enjoy the wonderful world of rabbits — play games with your bunny, join clubs and organizations, show your rabbit, and make traveling with bunny easy Open the book and find: Informative photos and illustrations Detailed breed descriptions How to think like a rabbit Tips for handling bad bunny behavior The latest on organic cuisine and homegrown feeding options Games to play with your rabbit How to live with an indoor bunny (which is recommended!) Ten signs that require emergency action A bunch of bunny resources — from rescue groups to registries to Web sites

Molecular Mechanism of Muscle Contraction

Molecular Mechanism of Muscle Contraction

It is now widely recognized that fundamental progress in science is made not in a continuous manner but in a stepwise manner. In the field of the molecular mechanism of contraction in striated muscle, the stepwise progress was achieved by three great investigators in 1940's and 1950's. In the early 1940's, Albert Szent-Gyorgyi and his associates showed biochemically that muscle contraction is essentially an interaction between actin and myosin coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Then, in the 1950's, Hugh E. Huxley together with Jean Hanson demonstrated that striated muscle is composed of a hexagonal lattice of two kinds of interdigtating myofilaments consisting of action and myosin respectively, and made a monumental discovery that muscle contraction results from the relative sliding between the actin and myosin filaments. Andrew F. Huxley, who also participated in the discovery of the sliding filament mechanism of muscle contraction was attributed to the attachment-detachment cycle between the cross-bridges extending from the myosin filament and the complementary sites on the actin filament. After the above stepwise progress, however, muscle research appears to have entered into a period of so-called 'normal science' where detailed knowledge has been accumulating around the well established 'central dogmas' but without fundamental progress. More specifically, most experiments on muscle contraction mechanisms have been designed, carried out and interpreted on the basis of the Huxley's 1957 and the Huxley-Simmons' 1971 contraction models, as well as the kinetic scheme of actomyosin ATPase; but the molecular mechanism of contraction still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. For further fundamental progress in this field of research, we feel it necessary to reconsider the validity of these dogmas and to interpret the results more freely. In 1978, one of us (H.S.) organized a symposium in Tokyo based on the above idea, and we published the proceedings under the title of "Cross-bridge Mechanism in Muscle Contraction" (ed. H. Sugi and G.H. Pollack, University of Tokyo Press/University Park Press, 1979). The unusual interest of muscle physiologists in this symposium encouraged us to organize a second symposium on muscle contraction in Seattle in 1982, and proceedings was again published under the title of "Contractile Mechanisms in Muscle" (ed. G.H. Pollack and H. Sugi, Plenum Publishing Corporation, 1984). We were again very much encouraged by the intense interest of the people at the symposium as well as by readers of the proceedings, and became convinced that the symposia of this kind would greatly accelerate the progress in this field. The present symposium was organized by one of us (H.S.) as the third "Cross-bride" symposium. Though most papers are concerned, as in the previous two symposia, with experiments on intact and demembranated muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils, where the three-Dimensional muofilament-lattice structures have been preserved, the results are frequently discussed in connection with the kinetics of actomyosin ATPase, reflecting the recent development of experimental methods connecting physiology and biochemistry. It has also become possible to obtain direct information about the orientation and configuration of the cross-bridges as various stages during muscle contraction.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence

This extraordinary story of courage and faith is based on the actual experiences of three girls who fled from the repressive life of Moore River Native Settlement, following along the rabbit-proof fence back to their homelands. Assimilationist policy dictated that these girls be taken from their kin and their homes in order to be made white. Settlement life was unbearable with its chains and padlocks, barred windows, hard cold beds, and horrible food. Solitary confinement was doled out as regular punishment. The girls were not even allowed to speak their language. Of all the journeys made since white people set foot on Australian soil, the journey made by these girls born of Aboriginal mothers and white fathers speaks something to everyone.