The Productive Academic Writer

An Easy-To-Read Guide to Low-Stress Prolific Writing

The Productive Academic Writer

Are you an academic feeling stressed out because of the increasing demands placed upon you to work harder and produce more? If so, you are not alone. The intense pressure of graduate, post-doctoral study, and early-career academia leading to mental health problems is now well-known. Publish or perish! Have you had the excruciating experience of sitting in front of the computer and staring at the monitor hoping that words would start appearing magically forming sentences and paragraphs? Have you ever given up after starting a manuscript resigning to the idea that you just don’t have enough time to complete it now, but that you will come back to it later which never happened? Having played the role of a student, post-doc, researcher, research faculty member, author, reviewer, and editor, Kasthurirangan "Rangan" Gopalakrishnan, Ph.D., fully understands and empathizes with the struggles and pleasures of academic work. In this book, his goal is to assist you to to do what you are already doing more effectively and efficiently with minimal stress, and possibly to identify and eliminate those activities and habits that interfere with your academic writing productivity. You are invited to learn and explore how to: Overcome your limiting beliefs and dismantle common myths about writing that can interfere with your productivity Set SMART goals Develop a weekly plan and daily To-Do lists that puts writing as one of the topmost priorities Use freewriting technique to write a lot and produce the messy first draft Use writing to stimulate your critical thinking Set a timer while you write and monitor your daily output to improve your productivity Use an accountability mechanism suited for you to overcome feelings of isolation, exchange and learn new ideas, socialize and connect with other writers

Becoming an Academic Writer

50 Exercises for Paced, Productive, and Powerful Writing

Becoming an Academic Writer

This book helps academic writers gain control over writing and publishing, master specific aspects of academic writing, and improve their productivity. Patricia Goodson offers weekly exercises and tools to achieve these goals. The exercises are theoretically-grounded and empirically-based, comprising a set of behavioral principles (e.g., writing regularly, separating generating from editing) and specific practices (weekly exercises) which ensure success. The author draws on research on writing and productivity in college settings, together with insights into the practice patterns of elite performers (such as Olympic athletes), to develop a set of key principles. This book uniquely combines these successful principles with a set of original exercises applicable to the writing needs of college professors and students.

How to Write a Lot

A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing

How to Write a Lot

"All academics need to write, and many struggle to finish their dissertations, articles, books, or grant proposals. Writing is hard work and can be difficult to wedge into a frenetic academic schedule. This revised and updated edition of Paul Silvia's popular guide provides practical, lighthearted advice to help academics overcome common barriers and become productive writers. Silvia's expert tips have been updated to apply to a wide variety of disciplines, and this edition has a new chapter devoted to grant and fellowship writing"--

The Productive Graduate Student Writer

How to Manage Your Time, Process, and Energy to Write Your Research Proposal, Thesis, and Dissertation and Get Published

The Productive Graduate Student Writer

This book is for graduate students--and others--who want to become more productive writers. It's especially written for those who want to: • increase their motivation, focus, and persistence to move a project to completion • overcome procrastination and perfectionistic tendencies • reduce (or write in spite of) their anxiety and fear of writing • manage their time, work, energy (and advisor) for greater productivity The process or craft of sustained writing is not a matter that’s taught to undergraduate or graduate students as part of their studies, leaving most at sea about how to start a practice that is central to a career in academe and vital in many other professional occupations. This book grew out of conversations Jan Allen has held with her graduate students for over 30 years and reflects the fruit of the writing workshops and boot camps she has conducted at three universities, her own and numerous colleagues’ experiences with writing and advising, as well as the feedback she receives from her popular Productive Writer listserv. While Jan Allen recognizes that writing is not an innate talent for most of us, she demonstrates that it is a process based on skills which we can identify, learn, practice and refine. She focuses both on the process and habits of writing as well as on helping you uncover what kind of writer are you, and reflect on your challenges and successes. With a light touch and an engaging sense of humor, she proposes strategies to overcome procrastination and distractions, and build a writing practice to enable you to become a more productive and prolific writer. Jan Allen proposes that you read one of her succinct chapters – each devoted to a specific strategy or writing challenge – each day, or once a week. When you find one that increases your concentration, motivation or endurance, make it a habit. Try it for two weeks, charting the resulting increased productivity. It will become part of your repertoire of writing and productivity tools to which you can progressively add.

Writing For Academic Journals

Writing For Academic Journals

This book unravels the process of writing academic papers. It tells readers what good papers look like and how they can be written.

Efficient Book Writing

A Strategic Program for Improving Writing Productivity

Efficient Book Writing

"This is not a book about the nuts and bolts of sentence structure, grammar, and the like, but one that focuses specifically on what you need to do to successfully begin a writing project and bring it to completion. Anyone who is a writer or who aspires to become a writer will benefit from its advice. Part I of the book discusses how to plan your writing. Matters such as identifying your purpose, considering your target audience, and addressing your anxieties about writing are covered. Part II is about gathering ideas and creating your outline. Useful suggestions include keeping an idea book, maintaining a journal, and holding brainstorming writing sessions. The third part of the book covers the actual writing of the book itself, starting with the first draft and continuing on until you have your final copy. One of the most useful suggestions in this part involves doing "freewriting," that is, writing whatever comes to mind and doing it quickly (as a way of stimulating the creative juices). Part IV is on systematizing the writing process. Perhaps the best piece of advice from this section involves overcoming perfectionism and negative self-talk. This section also talks about the importance of making time for writing, developing your writing routine, and getting rid of distractions. The last part of the book is titled "Getting Your Writing Done." Like the other parts, Part V contains many useful suggestions. One of the best is this: "Start very small and build on it." As someone who has written his entire adult life, I have found that the hardest part of writing a book or article is getting into the swing of things. Like training to run a marathon, a writing project takes discipline and conditioning. Beginning with writing small chunks at a time and building one's writing stamina over time is sound advice. At the end of the book is a helpful recap that provides a quick summary of all the points and is useful in reinforcing the points made throughout the book. This is a must read for any aspiring writer." - Top 50 Reviewer

Academic Writing and Identity Constructions

Performativity, Space and Territory in Academic Workplaces

Academic Writing and Identity Constructions

This book presents multiple cultural and contextual takes on working performances of academic/writer/thinker, both inside and outside the academy. With worldwide, seismic shifts taking place in both the contexts and terrains of universities, and subsequently the altering of what it means to write as an academic and work in academia, the editors and contributors use writing to position and re-position themselves as academics, thinkers and researchers. Using as a point of departure universities and academic/writing work contexts shaped by the increasing dominance of commodification, measurement and performativity, this volume explores responses to these evolving, shifting contexts. In response to the growing global interest in writing as performance, this book breaks new ground by theorizing multiple identity constructions of academic/writer/researcher; considering the possibilities and challenges of engaging in academic writing work in ways that are authentic and sustainable. This reflective and interdisciplinary volume will resonate with students and scholars of academic writing, as well as all those working to reconcile different facets of identity.

Risk in Academic Writing

Postgraduate Students, their Teachers and the Making of Knowledge

Risk in Academic Writing

This book brings together a variety of voices – students and teachers, journal editors and authors, writers from the global north and south – to interrogate the notion of risk as it applies to the production of academic writing. Risk-taking is viewed as a productive force in teaching, learning and writing, and one that can be used to challenge the silences and erasures inherent in academic tradition and convention. Widening participation and the internationalisation of higher education make questions of language, register, agency and identity in postgraduate writing all the more pressing, and this book offers a powerful argument against the further reinforcement of a ‘northern’ Anglophone understanding of knowledge and its production and dissemination. This volume will provide food-for-thought for postgraduate students and their supervisors everywhere.

The Handbook Of Academic Writing: A Fresh Approach

The Handbook Of Academic Writing: A Fresh Approach

Writing is one of the most demanding tasks that academics and researchers face. In some disciplines we learn some of what we need to know to be productive, successful writers; but in other disciplines there is no training, support or mentoring of any kind.