The Poison Tree

The Poison Tree

Nagendra Natha Datta is about to travel by boat. It is the month Joisto (May - June), the time of storms. His wife, Surja Mukhi, had adjured him, saying, "Be careful; if a storm arises be sure you fasten the boat to the shore. Do not remain in the boat." Nagendra had consented to this, otherwise Surja Mukhi would not have permitted him to leave home; and unless he went to Calcutta his suits in the Courts would not prosper. Nagendra Natha was a young man, about thirty years of age, a wealthy zemindar (landholder) in Zillah Govindpur. He dwelt in a small village which we shall call Haripur. He was travelling in his own boat. The first day or two passed without obstacle. The river flowed smoothly on - leaped, danced, cried out, restless, unending, playful. On shore, herdsmen were grazing their oxen - one sitting under a tree singing, another smoking, some fighting, others eating. Inland, husbandmen were driving the plough, beating the oxen, lavishing abuse upon them, in which the owner shared.

Fruit of the Poison Tree

Fruit of the Poison Tree

Fruit of the Poison Tree is the second book in Lisa Compton's paranormal crime procedural series featuring Olivia Osborne, a forensic psychologist and former FBI agent who possess the unique ability to experience the presence of those who have "crossed over" as well as the living who are influenced by evil forces.

The Poison Tree

The Morland Dynasty, Book 17

The Poison Tree

1831: as England emerges from the post war depression, the country is changing, and the birth pains of the Reform Act bring it to the brink of revolution. The violent times breed violent acts, both outside and inside the Morland family. Sophie's life is shattered by a hideous crime. Rosamund learns that achieving her dreams brings as much pain as pleasure. Heloise, mourning her beloved James, lets control of Morland Place fall into chaos- Benedict has to flee his home and makes a life amongst the railway pioneers, while Nicholas now has the freedom to indulge the dark side of his nature. And amongst them all stalks the deadly, invisible threat of cholera.

The Poison Tree (World's Classics Series)

The Poison Tree (World's Classics Series)

This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. The Poison Tree revolves around Nagendra, a wealthy zamindar, and his wife Surjamukhi, who loves her husband very much. On a trip to Calcutta Nagendra meets young orphan girl, Kunda Nandini and decides to bring her into his family. The induction of Kunda Nandini creates a distortion in fidelity of Nagendra to his wife.

The Poison Tree

The Poison Tree

By the end of that summer, two people would be dead... Fans of In A Dark Dark Wood and The Couple Next Door will love this twisty thriller. I have given up so much and done so many terrible things already for the sake of my family that I can only keep going. I do not know what is going to happen to us. I am frightened, but I feel strong. I have the strength of a woman who has everything to lose. In the sweltering summer of 1997, strait-laced, straight-A student Karen met Biba - a bohemian and impossibly glamorous aspiring actress. She was quickly drawn into Biba's world, and for a while life was one long summer of love. But every summer must end. By the end of theirs, two people were dead - and now Karen's past has come back to haunt her . . . STONE MOTHERS, the new novel by Erin Kelly, is available to buy now!

The Poison Tree: A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal

The Poison Tree: A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal

"The Poison Tree: A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal" by Bankim Chandra Chatterji (translated by Miriam S. Knight). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

The Poison Tree: A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal

The Poison Tree: A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal

Nagendra Natha Datta is about to travel by boat. It is the month Joisto (May—June), the time of storms. His wife, Surja Mukhi, had adjured him, saying, "Be careful; if a storm arises be sure you fasten the boat to the shore. Do not remain in the boat." Nagendra had consented to this, otherwise Surja Mukhi would not have permitted him to leave home; and unless he went to Calcutta his suits in the Courts would not prosper. Nagendra Natha was a young man, about thirty years of age, a wealthy zemindar (landholder) in Zillah Govindpur. He dwelt in a small village which we shall call Haripur. He was travelling in his own boat. The first day or two passed without obstacle. The river flowed smoothly on—leaped, danced, cried out, restless, unending, playful. On shore, herdsmen were grazing their oxen—one sitting under a tree singing, another smoking, some fighting, others eating. Inland, husbandmen were driving the plough, beating the oxen, lavishing abuse upon them, in which the owner shared. The wives of the husbandmen, bearing vessels of water, some carrying a torn quilt, or a dirty mat, wearing a silver amulet round the neck, a ring in the nose, bracelets of brass on the arm, with unwashed garments, their skins blacker than ink, their hair unkempt, formed a chattering crowd. Among them one beauty was rubbing her head with mud, another beating a child, a third speaking with a neighbour in abuse of some nameless person, a fourth beating clothes on a plank. Further on, ladies from respectable villages adorned the gháts (landing-steps) with their appearance—the elders conversing, the middle-aged worshipping Siva, the younger covering their faces and plunging into the water; the boys and girls screaming, playing with mud, stealing the flowers offered in worship, swimming, throwing water over every one, sometimes stepping up to a lady, snatching away the image of Siva from her, and running off with it. The Brahmans, good tranquil men, recited the praises ofGanga (the sacred river Ganges) and performed their worship, sometimes, as they wiped their streaming hair, casting glances at the younger women. In the sky, the white clouds float in the heated air. Below them fly the birds, like black dots. In the cocoanut trees, kites, like ministers of state, look around to see on what they can pounce; the cranes, being only small fry, stand raking in the mud; the dahuk(coloured herons), merry creatures, dive in the water; other birds of a lighter kind merely fly about. Market-boats sail along at good speed on their own behalf; ferry-boats creep along at elephantine pace to serve the needs of others only: cargo boats make no progress at all—that is the owners' concern.

The Poison Tree

A Tale of Hindu Life in Bengal

The Poison Tree


A Study Guide for William Blake's "A Poison Tree"

A Study Guide for William Blake's

A Study Guide for William Blake's "A Poison Tree," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Poetry for Students. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Poetry for Students for all of your research needs.

The Poison Tree

The Poison Tree

Moving to Oxford to take up her doctorate in the wake of her failed marriage, Terry Williams discovers that her new home had been the scene of a rape and murder that continues to affect the seemingly everyday people around her.