The New Testament in Antiquity

A Survey of the New Testament within Its Cultural Context

The New Testament in Antiquity

The New Testament in Antiquity is a textbook for college and seminary students penned by three evangelical scholars with over fifty years of combined experience in the classroom. Their challenge was to build a text that would be engaging, academically robust, richly illustrated, and relevant to the modern student. This book strikes a balance between being accessible to all students and challenging them to explore the depths of the New Testament within its cultural worlds. The New Testament in Antiquity carefully develops how Jewish and Hellenistic cultures formed the essential environment in which the New Testament authors wrote their books and letters. It argues that knowing the land, history, and culture of this world brings remarkable new insights into how we read the New Testament itself. Numerous sidebars provide windows into the Jewish, Hellenistic, and Roman worlds and integrate this material directly with the interpretation of the literature of the New Testament. This is an ideal introductory text for classroom use, with ample discussion questions and bibliographies.

The New Testament in Antiquity and Byzantium

Traditional and Digital Approaches to its Texts and Editing A Festschrift for Klaus Wachtel

The New Testament in Antiquity and Byzantium

Klaus Wachtel has pioneered the creation of major editions of the Greek New Testament through a blend of traditional philological approaches and innovative digital tools. In this volume, an international range of New Testament scholars and editors honour his achievements with thirty-one original studies. Many of the themes mirror Wachtel's own publications on the history of the Byzantine text, the identification of manuscript families and groups, detailed analysis of individual witnesses and the development of software and databases to support the editorial process. Other contributions draw on the production of the Editio Critica Maior, with reference to the Gospels of Mark and John, the Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline Epistles and the Apocalypse. Several chapters consider the application of the Coherence-Based Genealogical Method. A wide selection of material is considered, from papyri to printed editions. The Greek text is analysed from multiple perspectives, including exegesis, grammar and orthography, alongside evidence from versions in Latin, Syriac, Coptic and Gothic. This collection provides new insights into the history of the biblical text and the creation, development, analysis and application of modern editions.

The New Testament in Antiquity, 2nd Edition

A Survey of the New Testament within Its Cultural Contexts

The New Testament in Antiquity, 2nd Edition

This completely revised and updated second edition of The New Testament in Antiquity skillfully develops how Jewish, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures formed the essential environment in which the New Testament authors wrote their books and letters. Understanding of the land, history, and culture of the ancient world brings remarkable new insights into how we read the New Testament itself. Throughout the book, numerous features provide windows into the first-century world. Nearly 500 full color photos, charts, maps, and drawings have been carefully selected. Additional features include sidebars that integrate the book's material with issues of interpretation, discussion questions, and bibliographies.

The New Testament in Antiquity Video Lectures

A Survey of the New Testament Within Its Cultural Contexts

The New Testament in Antiquity Video Lectures

The New Testament in Antiquity Video Lectures, presented by scholars Gary Burge and Gene Green, skillfully develop how Jewish, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures formed the essential environment in which the New Testament authors wrote their books and letters.

Memory in the Bible and Antiquity

The Fifth Durham-Tübingen Research Symposium (Durham, September 2004)

Memory in the Bible and Antiquity

The volume brings together essays that explore the topic of memory and remembrance in the ancient world, taking into account the Hebrew Bible (Deuteronomy, 1 and 2 Kings), ancient Judaism (1 and 2 Maccabees, Psalms of Solomon, Dead Sea Scrolls), the classical world, the New Testament (Jesus, Synoptic Gospels and Acts, Gospel of John, Pauline letters) and Early Christianity (Petrine tradition). The essays, which focus on a wide range of sources from antiquity, open up new questions about the social and religious function of memory. As a collection, they demonstrate how much social memory theory can contribute to the understanding of the ways ancient texts were, on the one hand, shaped by conventions of memory and, on the other hand, participated in and contributed to evolving strategies for reading "the past."

Jesus and the Land

The New Testament Challenge to "Holy Land" Theology

Jesus and the Land

Describes first-century Jewish and Christian beliefs about the land of Israel and examines present-day tensions, helping readers develop a Christian theology of the land.

The New Testament in Seven Sentences

A Small Introduction to a Vast Topic

The New Testament in Seven Sentences

To understand the breadth of the gospel's message, we need to perceive the full tapestry of Scripture. Using seven key sentences from the New Testament, Gary M. Burge demonstrates how the themes of fulfillment, kingdom, cross, grace, covenant, spirit, and completion set a theological rhythm for our faith, outlining the broader pattern of Scripture that illustrates what God has done—and is bringing to fulfillment—in Christ.

New Testament Among the Writings of Antiquity

New Testament Among the Writings of Antiquity

In this useful work, Dormeyer assesses the influence of Hellenistic culture upon the New Testament as a literary work. There is no denying the impact of Jewish literature upon the New Testament, but even those Jewish antecedents were themselves not infrequently imprinted with Hellenistic characteristics. Dormeyer's method is to consider in turn the literary forms (Gattungen) of the New Testament, outlining with many examples the parallels between the New Testament and Hellenistic literature. The Synoptic sayings, for instance, are closest in character to the Hellenistic gnome, though the representation of Jesus as an eschatological and prophetic wisdom teacher shows a marked difference from other teachers of wisdom in Hellenistic circles. Other areas of close correspondence with Hellenistic literature lie in the form and rhetoric of the New Testament epistles, and in the structure of the Gospels, which invoke the canons of Hellenistic historiography and biography. Throughout, Dormeyer is at pains to stress the contours of the special quality of the New Testament literature as the product of a quite small community that nevertheless brought into being a number of authors of exceptional talent.

The Interpretation of the New Testament in Greco-Roman Paganism

The Interpretation of the New Testament in Greco-Roman Paganism

Recent New Testament scholarship has raised the question of the effect of the New Testament on readers including an 'implied' reader. How did the New Testament affect ancient readers who rejected it? John Granger Cook contributes to the ongoing investigation of the relationship between Christianity and Greco-Roman antiquity. He addresses the response to the New Testament in the following authors: Celsus, Porphyry, the anonymous philosopher of Macarius Magnes, Hierocles, and Julian the Apostate. These authors are readers who found the New Testament to be a rejection of values they took to be fundamental in Greco-Roman culture. The works of these pagans exist in fragments preserved by Christian apologists who attempted to respond to their critique of Christian texts and practices. The doctrine of the resurrection, for example, contradicts the belief in reincarnation and an immortal bodiless soul. Apocalyptic texts rejected the eternity of the universe. Jesus was considered to be inferior to the heroes of Hellenistic culture such as Apollonius of Tyana who conducted themselves as philosophers should. Pagans were disturbed by the ability of Christian language to persuade people to join the movement. Both pagans and Christians made use of apologetic techniques designed to attract people to their respective positions. Rhetoric and literary criticism were tools that both used in their ongoing arguments. John Granger Cook makes use of these tools to analyze the texts of the pagan readers of the New Testament.

Christian Apocrypha

Receptions of the New Testament in Ancient Christian Apocrypha

Christian Apocrypha

Narrative receptions of New Testament texts in ancient Christian apocryphal literature.