The Neuropsychology of Attention

The Neuropsychology of Attention

It has been 15 years since the original publication of Neuropsychology of Attention. At the time of its publication, attention was a construct that had long been of theoretical interest in the field of psychology and was receiving increased research by cognitive scientists. Yet, attention was typically viewed as a nuisance variable; a factor that needed to be accounted for when assessing brain function, but of limited importance in its own right. There is a need for a new edition of this book within Neuropsychology to present an updated and integrated review of what is know about attention, the disorders that affect it, and approaches to its clinical assessment and treatment. Such a book will provide perspectives for experimental neuropsychological study of attention and also provide clinicians with insights on how to approach this neuropsychological domain.

The Neuropsychology of Attention

The Neuropsychology of Attention

This text provides a synthesis of theories, concepts, and experimental findings regarding the neuropsychology of attention. The volume is divided into three parts. Part I reviews the basic concepts necessary to neuropsychological considerations, culminating in the presentation of a theoretical framework of attention. In Part II, this theoretical at.

Clinical Neuropsychology of Attention

Clinical Neuropsychology of Attention

Written by a clinical neuropsychologist and a cognitive psychologist, this work presents an integrated view of the multi-faceted concept of attention. In neuropsychology, attention has different meanings depending on the nature of the neurological disorder and the theoretical background of the investigator. To provide insight into these theoretical backgrounds, this volume opens with a discussion of psychological and neurobiological theories of attention. The book does not adopt a particular theoretical orientation but tries to clarify the various conceptualizations of attention that are encountered in the literature. Throughout, the book critically reviews the literature on attentional deficits in frequently occurring neurological conditions such as traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. This material is organized according to the types of tasks used to investigate attention, such as tests of focused, divided and sustained attention. The book concludes with three chapters on topics that underline its practical aim: assessment of attention, the relationship between test performance and everyday activities, and the rehabilitation of impairments of attention. This comprehensive work will be invaluable to neuropsychologists, neurologists, clinical psychologists, gerontologists, and rehabilitation specialists.

Applied Neuropsychology of Attention

Theory, Diagnosis and Rehabilitation

Applied Neuropsychology of Attention

The concept of attention in academic psychology has been treated with varying degrees of importance over the years. From playing a key role in the 19th century, it was discarded in the first half of the 20th century, as clinical psychologists claimed it was superfluous to the essential subconscious processes of the mind, and experimental psychologists thought it was not a scientific term. Applied Neuropsychology of Attention aims to review the considerable developments in the field of attention over the last 20 years as it makes its comeback. This collection of essays forms a comprehensive overview of this crucial component of human cognitive function. The book begins with an explanation of the essential theoretical concepts and definitions. Aspects of diagnosis are then discussed as the assessment and impairments of attention are reviewed in normal ageing and in specific neurological categories. Victims of brain injury and patients with cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative diseases are considered. A critical analysis of existing practices in cognitive rehabilitation is given and a review of the techniques and methodologies used for treating attentional disturbances brings the book to a conclusion. Leclercq and Zimmermann have compiled a book of cutting-edge research which provides an effective framework to detect, analyse and understand the nature of attention deficit. The book will be invaluable to clinicians, mental health specialists and all academic psychologists in the field.

The Neuropsychology of Psychopathology

The Neuropsychology of Psychopathology

This clinical reference book presents state-of-the-science knowledge about the neurobiology and genetics of the major mental disorders and how this corresponds with their psychiatric features and neuropsychological traits. The text demonstrates how the application of neuropsychology to these disorders provides a more comprehensive foundation for greater accuracy in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. The book focuses on the neuropathological and pathophysiological basis of the various symptoms, emphasizing the biological basis of each disorder. This approach stresses the importance of looking at the other functional impacts of these manifestations (for example, cognitive deficits secondary to depression). The text compares adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders and covers the major forms of psychopathology including ADHD; Learning Disabilities; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Mood, Anxiety, Personality, and Schizophrenic Disorders; Cortical and Subcortical Dementias; and Delirium. The book is written for clinical professionals to increase diagnostic accuracy and intervention success and to provide a way to approach psychopathologies as disorders of the neurological system. Key Features: Provides state-of-the-science knowledge about the application of neuropsychological practice to the major forms of psychopathology Examines neurological and neuropsychological features of the major forms of psychopathology Demonstrates how the application of neurobiology and genetics to psychiatric disorders can increase accuracy of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment Considers adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders

The Neuropsychology of Autism

The Neuropsychology of Autism

The Neuropsychology of Autism provides an up-to-date summary on the neuropsychology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), written by leaders in the field. It summarizes current knowledge about neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, genetics, and clinical presentations and provides helpful discussions on key functions such as language, memory, attention, executive functions, social cognition, motor and sensory functioning.

The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Attention

A Special Issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology

The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Attention

The theme of this Special Issue is one that is ill-served by the existing neuropsychological literature. A publication that collates reviews of the developmental, physiological, clinical and cognitive aspects of this topic is therefore timely and would prove valuable to clinicians, researchers and students alike. The underlying problem addressed by the invited contributors is how attention is manifest in the intact brain, and how disorders of attention present themselves in the damaged brain. The topics to be covered will range from the physiology of attention (as revealed by single unit recording studies of extra-striate cortex of monkeys and PET scans in humans and low frequency EEG recordings) to disorders of attention after brain damage (e.g. stroke) and chronic pathological disorders of the brain (e.g. dyslexia and mental retardation). The range of contributions to the Special Issue demonstrates that the kinds of attentional processing required are determined by the task in hand. Correspondingly the volume discusses attention in the parietal, temporal and frontal lobes of the human and macaque brain, investigated by clinical, electrophysiological and behavioural methods. Attentional processes are also shown to be distributed in the brain and the effects of diminished attentional capacities which do not result from focal brain lesions are discussed in the context of mental retardation and dyslexia.

The Neuropsychology of High-level Vision

Collected Tutorial Essays

The Neuropsychology of High-level Vision

This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain. Topics covered include object representation and recognition, category-specific visual knowledge, perceptual processes in reading, top-down processes in vision -- including attention and mental imagery -- and the relations between vision and conscious awareness. Each chapter includes a tutorial overview emphasizing the current state of knowledge and outstanding theoretical issues in the authors' area of research, along with a more in-depth report of an illustrative research project in the same area. The editors and contributors to this volume are among the most respected figures in the field of neuropsychology and perception, making the work presented here a standard-setting text and reference in that area.

The Neuropsychology of Consciousness

The Neuropsychology of Consciousness

The Neuropsychology of Consciousness is based on a symposium entitled “Consciousness and Cognition: Neuropsychological Perspectives held at the University of St Andrews, September 1990. The intention was to assemble a group of the major researchers at the forefront of this field. The starting point for the symposium and for the book was the widespread realization that in several areas of human cognition (e.g. visual perception, memory, language comprehension, and attention), the severe and profound impairments due to brain damage that have been described over the past 150 years are often not absolute. In particular, the use of indirect methods of testing may reveal unsuspected preservation of capacities that are undetected by more traditional direct methods. The book opens with a discussion of the epidemic of dissociations and how well the phenomena within either neuropsychology or within normal human experimental psychology map onto each other. This is followed by separate chapters on topics such as blindsight, covert visual processing in patients, face recognition and awareness following brain injury, and the relationship between the study of attention and the understanding of consciousness.

The Neuropsychology of Everyday Life: Issues in Development and Rehabilitation

The Neuropsychology of Everyday Life: Issues in Development and Rehabilitation

For a period of some fifteen years following completion of my internship training in clinical psychology (1950-1951) at the Washington University School of Medicine and my concurrent successful navigation through that school's neuroanatomy course, clinical work in neuropsychology for me and the psychologists of my generation consisted almost exclusively of our trying to help our physician colleagues differentiate patients with neurologic disorders from those with psychiatric disorders. In time, experience led all of us from the several disciplines involved in this enterprise to the conclusion that the crude diagnostic techniques available to us circa 1945-1965 had garnered little valid information on which to base such complex, differential diagnostic decisions. It now is gratifying to look back and review the remarkable progress that has occurred in the field of clinical neuropsychology in the four decades since I was a graduate student. In the late 1940s such pioneers as Ward Halstead, Alexander Luria, George Yacorzynski, Hans-Lukas Teuber, and Arthur Benton already were involved in clinical studies that, by the late 1960s, would markedly have improved the quality of clinical practice. However, the only psychological tests that the clinical psychologist of my immediate post Second Wodd War generation had as aids for the diagnosis of neurologically based conditions involving cognitive deficit were such old standbys as the Wechsler-Bellevue, Rorschach, Draw A Person, Bender Gestalt, and Graham Kendall Memory for Designs Test.