The Literary Life and Correspondence of the Countess of Blessington

The Literary Life and Correspondence of the Countess of Blessington

R. R. Madden's 1855 three-volume biography of the Countess of Blessington documents her brilliant literary salon and her eventual financial ruin.

Women Writers and the Artifacts of Celebrity in the Long Nineteenth Century

Women Writers and the Artifacts of Celebrity in the Long Nineteenth Century

This collection traces the unique experiences of nineteenth-century women writers within a celebrity culture that was intimately connected to the expansion of print technology and of visual and material culture in the nineteenth century. The contributors examine a range of artifacts, including prefaces, portraits, frontispieces, birthday books and even gossip columns, in this suggestive exploration of how nineteenth-century women writers achieved popular, critical and commercial success.

The Silver Fork Novel

Fashionable Fiction in the Age of Reform

The Silver Fork Novel

This first modern study of silver-fork novels investigates their role in the alliance of middle class and aristocratic political principles.

The Artistry of Exile

The Artistry of Exile

The Artistry of Exile is a new study of one of the most important myths of nineteenth-century literature. Romantic poetry abounds with allusions to the loss of Eden and the isolation of figures who are 'sick for home'. This book explores the way such thematic preoccupations are modified by the material reality of enforced travel away from home.

Bright Stars

John Keats, Barry Cornwall and Romantic Literary Culture

Bright Stars

If we could ask a Romantic reader of new poetry in 1820 to identify the most celebrated poet of the day after Byron, the chances are that he or she would reply with the name of ‘Barry Cornwall’. Solicitor, dandy and pugilist, Cornwall – pseudonym of Bryan Waller Procter (1787-1874) – published his first poems in the Literary Gazette in late 1817. By February 1820, under the tutelage of Keats’s mentor, Leigh Hunt, Cornwall had produced three volumes of verse. Marcian Colonna sold 700 copies in a single morning, a figure exceeding Keats’s lifetime sales. Hazlitt’s suppressed anthology, Select British Poets (1824), allocated Cornwall nine pages – the same number as Keats, and more than Southey, Lamb or Shelley; Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine pronounced Cornwall a poet of ‘originality and genius’; and in 1821, Gold’s London Magazine announced that in terms of ‘tenderness and delicacy’ even Percy Shelley was ‘surpassed very far indeed by Barry Cornwall’. It is difficult to square Cornwall’s early nineteenth-century popularity with his subsequent neglect. In Bright Stars Richard Marggraf Turley concentrates on Cornwall’s phenomenonal success between 1817 and 1823, emphatically returning an important and unjustly neglected Romantic author to critical focus. Marggraf Turley explores Cornwall’s rivalry – and at various junctures, political camaraderie – with fellow Hunt protégé Keats, whose career exists in a fascinatingly mirrored relationship with his own trajectory into celebrity. The book argues that Cornwall helped to structure Keats’s experience as a poet but also explores the central question of how Cornwall’s racy and politically subversive poetry managed to establish a broad readership where Keats’s similarly indecorous publications met with review hostility and readerly indifference.