Inarticulate Longings

Inarticulate Longings explores the contradictions of a social agenda for women that promoted both traditional roles and the promises of a growing consumer culture by examining the advertising industry in the early 20th century.

Inarticulate Longings

Inarticulate Longings explores the contradictions of a social agenda for women that promoted both traditional roles and the promises of a growing consumer culture by examining the advertising industry in the early 20th century.

Magazines for the Millions

Argues that the two popular women's magazines were pivotal in the combining of gender and commercialism at the turn of the century, and that publishers and advertisers conspired to create both a gendered commercial discourse and a ...

Magazines for the Millions

Argues that the two popular women's magazines were pivotal in the combining of gender and commercialism at the turn of the century, and that publishers and advertisers conspired to create both a gendered commercial discourse and a commercial gender discourse for both men and women. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

Curtis Circulation 1922

Curtis Circulation   1922


Genre and White Supremacy in the Postemancipation United States

For a black preacher joke, see “He Knew his People,” The Ladies' Home Journal
23 (Apr. 1906): 2; for a black waiter joke immediately followed by a black
preacher joke, see “The Game the Waiter Preferred” and “The Real Miracle,” The
 ...

Genre and White Supremacy in the Postemancipation United States

How are we to comprehend, diagnose, and counter a system of racist subjugation so ordinary it has become utterly asymptomatic? Challenging the prevailing literary critical inclination toward what makes texts exceptional or distinctive, Genre and White Supremacy in the Postemancipation United States underscores the urgent importance of genre for tracking conventionality as it enters into, constitutes, and reproduces ordinary life. In the wake of emancipation's failed promise, two developments unfolded: white supremacy amassed new mechanisms and procedures for reproducing racial hierarchy; and black freedom developed new practices for collective expression and experimentation. This new racial ordinary came into being through new literary and cultural genres—including campus novels, the Ladies' Home Journal, Civil War elegies, and gospel sermons. Through the postemancipation interplay between aesthetic conventions and social norms, genre became a major influence in how Americans understood their social and political affiliations, their citizenship, and their race. Travis M. Foster traces this thick history through four decades following the Civil War, equipping us to understand ordinary practices of resistance more fully and to resist ordinary procedures of subjugation more effectively. In the process, he provides a model for how the study of popular genre can reinvigorate our methods for historicizing the everyday.