The Islamist Threat in Southeast Asia

A Reassessment

The Islamist Threat in Southeast Asia

In recent years, a steady stream of reportage and commentary has spotlighted a dangerous "Islamist threat" in Southeast Asia. This study, by contrast, offers a very different account. In descriptive terms, this study suggests that such an alarmist picture is highly overdrawn, and it traces instead a pattern of marked decline, demobilization, and disentanglement from state power in recent years for Islamist forces in Southeast Asia. This trend is evident both in the disappointments experienced in recent years by previously ascendant Islamist forces in Indonesia and Malaysia, and in the diminished position of Muslim power brokers in southern Thailand and the Philippines after more than a decade of cooperation with non-Muslim politicians in Manila and Bangkok. In explanatory terms, moreover, this study shows the significance of social and political context. A fuller appreciation of aggression by anti-Islamists and non-Muslims, and of the insecurity, weakness, and fractiousness of Islamist forces themselves, helps to explain the nature, extent, and limitations of Islamist violence, aggression, and assertiveness. This overarching alternative framework not only provides a very different explanation for the "Islamist threat" in Southeast Asia, but also suggests very different policy implications from those offered by specialists on terrorism working on the region.

The Islamic Threat

Myth or Reality?

The Islamic Threat

Are Islam and the West on a collision course? From the Ayatollah Khomeini to Saddam Hussein, the image of Islam as a militant, expansionist, and rabidly anti-American religion has gripped the minds of Western governments and media. But these perceptions, John L. Esposito writes, stem from a long history of mutual distrust, criticism, and condemnation, and are far too simplistic to help us understand one of the most important political issues of our time. In this new edition of The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality?, Esposito places the challenge of Islam in critical perspective. Exploring the vitality of this religion as a global force and the history of its relations with the West, Esposito demonstrates the diversity of the Islamic resurgence--and the mistakes our analysts make in assuming a hostile, monolithic Islam. This third edition has been expanded to include new material on current affairs in Turkey, Afghanistan, Palestine, and Southeast Asia, as well as a discussion of international terrorism.

Culture, Religion and Conflict in Muslim Southeast Asia

Negotiating Tense Pluralisms

Culture, Religion and Conflict in Muslim Southeast Asia

By examining the sometimes surprising and unexpected roles that culture and religion have played in mitigating or exacerbating conflicts, this book explores the cultural repertoires from which Southeast Asian political actors have drawn to negotiate the pluralism that has so long been characteristic of the region. Focusing on the dynamics of identity politics and the range of responses to the socio-political challenges of religious and ethnic pluralism, the authors assembled in this book illuminate the principal regional discourses that attempt to make sense of conflict and tensions. They examine local notions of "dialogue," "reconciliation," "civility" and "conflict resolution" and show how varying interpretations of these terms have informed the responses of different social actors across Southeast Asia to the challenges of conflict, culture and religion. The book demonstrates how stumbling blocks to dialogue and reconciliation can and have been overcome in different parts of Southeast Asia and identifies a range of actors who might be well placed to make useful contributions, propose remedies, and initiate action towards negotiating the region’s pluralism. This book provides a much needed regional and comparative analysis that makes a significant contribution to a better understanding of the interfaces between region and politics in Southeast Asia.

A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia

A Handbook of Terrorism and Insurgency in Southeast Asia

This is an important and worthwhile book that should be read by anyone seeking to understand the history and evolution of political violence in Southeast Asia, including the origins of contemporary militant Islamist terrorism. Paul J. Smith, Contemporary Southeast Asia This very fine collection shows how and why Southeast Asia has been afflicted with terrorism from the end of World War II to the present time. No other volume tells us as much about the period and area. Anyone interested in the general theory and practice of terrorism and insurgency will find it indispensable. David C. Rapoport, University of California, Los Angeles, US and Editor of Journal of Terrorism and Political Violence This stimulating collection of essays underlines how Southeast Asia has again, as at the height of the Cold War, been pushed towards the top of the list of world conflict zones by the collision between long-standing regional problems and more recent external frictions. Anyone needing to learn more about the relationship between the war on terror and Southeast Asia, particularly regarding terrorism in Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines, will need to consult this work. Brian P. Farrell, National University of Singapore, and author of The Defence and Fall of Singapore 1940 1942 This book is an excellent addition to the literature on political violence in Southeast Asia providing a wealth of detail on terrorism, guerilla insurgency, and the use of terror and repression by governments. The book is especially valuable for the broad coverage of many different groups (not just Islamic ones), inclusion of the activities of governments, and a variety of opinions and views on terrorism and political violence. This book should be one of the essential resources for academics, policymakers, or anyone else interested in terrorism, insurgency, and political violence in the region. It is an extremely valuable tool for one and all. James M. Lutz, Indiana University Purdue University, US and co-author of Global Terrorism, with Brenda Lutz This is an excellent volume, which is very well conceived and balanced in its treatment of the problem of terrorism and insurgency in Southeast Asia. This volume will greatly advance our empirical understanding of conflict and violence in this pivotal region. The book contains many insightful contributions and, overall, the Handbook will serve as a standard reference on the subject matter for years to come. M.L.R. Smith, King s College, University of London, UK This timely and significant book seeks to explain the deep-seated complexities of terrorism and insurgency in Southeast Asia. In the aftermath of 9/11, this region has been designated by the United States to be the second front in the war on terrorism. Yet despite the emergence of this new global terrorism, the authors argue that armed rebellion in Southeast Asia is a phenomenon that predates Al Qaeda and the global Jihadist movement and that much can be learned from the motivations behind it. Written by a group of leading Western and emerging Southeast Asian scholars, this extensive volume demonstrates the difficulty and diversity of rebellion in Southeast Asia, and explores its intricate historical, political, social and economic roots. The book will serve as an excellent reference and educational text, providing an empirical and regional guide to the complex problem of insurgency in Southeast Asia. It will also contribute to a more educated understanding that could provide the basis for appropriate counter-terrorism strategies in this important part of the world. Comprehensive and engaging, this volume will find widespread appeal amongst researchers, students and policymakers interested in terrorism, international relations and Asian studies and will also be an invaluable tool for studies into political violence and security.

The Battle for Hearts and Minds

Using Soft Power to Undermine Terrorist Networks

The Battle for Hearts and Minds

The limits of military power / Rob de Wijk / - The future of international coalitions : how useful? How manageable? / Paul Dibb / - Forging an indirect strategy in southeast Asia / Barry Desker / - The imbalance of terror / Thérese Delpech / - The new nature of nation-state failure / Robert I. Rotberg / - Democracy by force : a renewed commitment to nation building / Karin von Hippel / - Sierra Leone : the state that came back from the dead / Michael Chege / - Toward postconflict reconstruction / John J. Hamre and Gordon R. / - Building better foundations : security in postconflict reconstruction / Scott Feil / - Dealing with demons : justice and reconciliation / Michèle Flournoy / - Governing when chaos rules : enhancing governance and participation / Robert Orr / - Public diplomacy comes of age / Christopher Ross / - Deeds speak Louder than words / Lamis Andoni / - A broadcasting strategy to win media wars / Edward Kaufman / - Compassionate conservatism confronts global poverty / Lae ...

Peaceful Islamist Mobilization in the Muslim World

What Went Right

Peaceful Islamist Mobilization in the Muslim World

In Peaceful Islamist Mobilization in the Muslim World: What Went Right , Julie Chernov Hwang presents a compelling and innovative new theory and framework for examining the variation in Islamist mobilization strategies in Muslim Asia and the Middle East.

The Graying of the Great Powers

Demography and Geopolitics in the 21st Century

The Graying of the Great Powers

The Graying of the Great Powers offers the first comprehensive assessment of the geopolitical implications of "global aging" - the dramatic transformation in population age structures and growth rates being brought about by falling fertility and rising longevity worldwide. It describes how demographic trends in the developed world will constrain the ability of the United States and its traditional allies to maintain national and global security in the decades ahead. It also explains how dramatic demographic change in the developing world - from resurgent youth bulges in the Islamic world to premature aging in China and population implosion in Russia - will give rise to serious new security threats. While some argue that global aging is pushing the world toward greater peace and prosperity, The Graying of the Great Powers warns that a period of great geopolitical danger looms just over the horizon. Neither the triumph of multilateralism nor democratic capitalism is assured. The demographic trends of the twenty-first century will challenge the geopolitical assumptions of both the left and the right.

Handbook Of Terrorism In The Asia-pacific

Handbook Of Terrorism In The Asia-pacific

The Handbook of Terrorism in the Asia-Pacific provides a historical overview of terrorism in the Asia-Pacific, the evolution of threat, and the present threat faced by countries with the rise of the Islamic State (IS). This is a concise and readable handbook which examines the origins of the current wave of terrorism across countries in Southeast Asia, South Asia, Northeast Asia and the Pacific, and identifies emerging trends and new forms of terror that have altered the landscape and rendered the region increasingly vulnerable to asymmetric attacks. Comprising of more than 20 chapters, this handbook will be a useful source of reference for undergraduate and graduate students focused on understanding the causes of terrorism and insurgency in the Asia-Pacific.

Colonialism, Violence and Muslims in Southeast Asia

The Maria Hertogh Controversy and Its Aftermath

Colonialism, Violence and Muslims in Southeast Asia

This book deals with the genesis, outbreak and far-reaching effects of a legal controversy and the resulting outbreak of mass violence, which determined the course of British colonial rule after post World War Two in Singapore and Malaya. Based on extensive archival sources, it examines the custody hearing of Maria Hertogh, a case which exposed tensions between Malay and Singaporean Muslims and British colonial society. Investigating the wide-ranging effects and crises faced in the aftermath of the riots, the analysis focuses in particular on the restoration of peace and rebuilding of society. The author provides a nuanced and sophisticated understanding of British management of riots and mass violence in Southeast Asia. By exploring the responses by non-British communities in Singapore, Malaya and the wider Muslim world to the Maria Hertogh controversy, he shows that British strategies and policies can be better understood through the themes of resistance and collaboration. Furthermore, the book argues that British enactment of laws pertaining to the management of religions in the post-war period had dispossessed religious minorities of their perceived religious rights. As a result, outbreaks of mass violence and continual grievances ensued in the final years of British colonial rule in Southeast Asia - and these tensions still pertain in the present. This book will be of interest to scholars and students of law and society, history, Imperial History and Asian Studies, and to anyone studying minorities, and violence and recovery.