The Invention of the Modern Dog

Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain

The Invention of the Modern Dog

Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain’s posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

The Modern Dog

A Joyful Exploration of How We Live with Dogs Today

The Modern Dog

Dogs are invented creatures -- invented by humans, who have been shaping the lives of these four-legged companions for more than 14,000 years. However, we often forget that, just as dogs live in our world, we live in theirs. The Modern Dog is a look at our coevolution, interpreting both canine and human points of view, by Dr. Stanley Coren, the most consistently popular author of dog books ever. A fascinating treasure trove of information gleaned from science, folklore, religious writing, tradition, and politics, The Modern Dog explores not only how dogs behave, but also how we share our lives with our dogs. Much more a romp than a formal exposition, The Modern Dog's profiles and tales are funny, sweet, quirky, and reveal a lot about both species and our centuries-long partnership. This book will show you how the mutually beneficial relationship between humans and dogs might very well be the reason why early Homo sapiens evolved and survived while Neanderthals became extinct. You will see how dogs have played many prominent roles in human history, from ancient Egypt, where Pharaoh Ramses II was buried with the names and statues of four of his dogs, to modern American politics, where many U.S. presidents have derived comfort from canine companionship. Our modern dog is quite different from the dogs that existed even a century ago, its job having changed dramatically from the hunting, herding, retrieving, and guarding for which many were bred. In this book, you will see that it is often how people respond to and interpret the actions of dogs (and dog owners) that has a greater effect on the dog's life than the behavior patterns that have been programmed into the dog's genes. The Modern Dog will show you how some of your dog's strange and funny habits are his own and some come from you. Illustrated throughout with Dr. Coren's own charming drawings, The Modern Dog chronicles the various aspects of how we interact with dogs, how society responds to dogs, how our relationships with dogs have changed over history, and where dogs fit into our personal and emotional lives. It does this by telling the stories of dogs that work, dogs that love, dogs that behave badly, and dogs that will make you laugh.

What's a Dog For?

The Surprising History, Science, Philosophy, and Politics of Man's Best Friend

What's a Dog For?

John Homans adopted his dog, Stella, from a shelter for all the usual reasons: fond memories of dogs from his past, a companion for his son, an excuse for long walks around the neighborhood. Soon enough, she is happily ensconced in the daily workings of his family. And not only that: Stella is treated like a family member—in ways that dogs of his youth were not. Spending humanlike sums on vet bills, questioning her diet and exercise regimens, contemplating her happiness—how had this all come to pass, when the dogs from Homans’s childhood seemed quite content living mostly out in the yard? In What’s a Dog For?, Homans explores the dog’s complex and prominent place in our world and how it came to be. Evolving from wild animals to working animals to nearly human members of our social fabric, dogs are now the subject of serious scientific studies concerning pet ownership, evolutionary theory, and even cognitive science. From new insights into what makes dogs so appealing to humans to the health benefits associated with owning a dog, Homans investigates why the human-canine relationship has evolved so rapidly—how dogs moved into our families, our homes, and sometimes even our beds in the span of a generation, becoming a $53 billion industry in the United States in the process. As dogs take their place as coddled family members and their numbers balloon to more than seventy-seven million in the United States alone, it’s no surprise that canine culture at large is also undergoing a massive transformation. They are now subject to many of the same questions of rights and ethics as people, and the politics of dogs are more tumultuous and public than ever— with fierce moral battles raging over kill shelters, puppy mills, and breed standards. Incorporating interviews and research from scientists, activists, breeders, and trainers, What’s a Dog For? investigates how dogs have reached this exalted status and why they hold such fascination for us. With one paw in the animal world and one paw in the human world, it turns out they have much to teach us about love, death, and morality—and ultimately, in their closeness and difference, about what it means to be human.

The Domestic Dog

Its Evolution, Behaviour and Interactions with People

The Domestic Dog

A scientific analysis of dogs, their behaviour, and their relationships with humans.

From Birdbrained to Brilliant

Training the Sporting Dog to Be a Great Companion

From Birdbrained to Brilliant

He can retrieve—but can he sit, lie down and stay?
Sporting dog breeds can be relatively easy to train to do what they have been bred to do be it retrieve, point, flush—even act as a decoy to attract game! In addition, most sporting breeds have a gregarious personality and love people and other dogs. These attributes make these dogs very popular pets, but at the same time present all sorts of problems when they are not working in the field. Have you ever tried to ask your Lab to sit and stay near a pond with the ducks? Why is it that Goldens are notorious for jumping up on people (not to mention other dogs) when greeting them? Does your sporting dog eat every smelly item he encounters before you can stop him? In this new book, author Dawn Antoniak-Mitchell offers answers to solving and preventing the often surprising set of problems that owners of sporting dogs encounter at home and in their local communities.

You will learn
• Many of the overly friendly traits associated with sporting dogs can cause problems with other people and other dogs if you cannot control your dog’s enthusiastic (and sometimes obnoxious) greeting behaviors.
• How to make yourself more interesting than birds, as impossible as that might seem, to make walks and outings more pleasant for all involved.
• How to train a strong “leave it” behavior to keep your dog from eating things that might be dangerous.

Praise for From Birdbrained to Brilliant
Having bred and trained sporting dogs for almost forty years, Dawn’s ideas are spot on for understanding that the mindset and work ethics of sporting dogs is based around them being “people dogs.” As a tracking judge, trainer and exhibitor I can attest that Dawn is correct when she says training sporting dogs is “an investment worth making.” Just like making an investment in this book!
Ed Presnall, noted trainer and judge, author of Component Training for TDX and four other books on the subject of tracking

From Birdbrained to Brilliant gave me more insight into my beloved retrievers than anything I’ve read in my 25+ years of working with assistance dogs. Ms. Antoniak-Mitchell provides a treasure trove of information for those of us who love sporting dogs. As entertaining as it is illuminating, this book has earned a center spot in my library!
Jennifer Arnold, author Through a Dog’s Eyes and In a Dog’s Heart

Hunt, point and/or retrieve yourself a copy of this book. Working with your sporting breed dog’s natural traits instead of against them is what From Birdbrained to Brilliant is all about. I’m so excited to see a down to earth and practical book that gives clear training and management exercises for field bred dogs.
Inga From, CPDT-KSA, owner Positive Gun Dogs of Minnesota

FIRST OF ALL who could resist this title? I work with all breeds and each group brings something a little different to the table. Dawn’s knowledge of sporting dogs is going to be invaluable to you because her insights into their instincts will improve your training and your dogs will live better lives because you will have learned how to understand and communicate better with them.
Brenda Aloff, author of Puppy Problems? No Problem and several other best selling books and dvds


Empire of Dogs

Canines, Japan, and the Making of the Modern Imperial World

Empire of Dogs

In 1924, Professor Ueno Eizaburo of Tokyo Imperial University adopted an Akita puppy he named Hachiko. Each evening Hachiko greeted Ueno on his return to Shibuya Station. In May 1925 Ueno died while giving a lecture. Every day for over nine years the Akita waited at Shibuya Station, eventually becoming nationally and even internationally famous for his purported loyalty. A year before his death in 1935, the city of Tokyo erected a statue of Hachiko outside the station. The story of Hachiko reveals much about the place of dogs in Japan's cultural imagination. In the groundbreaking Empire of Dogs, Aaron Herald Skabelund examines the history and cultural significance of dogs in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Japan, beginning with the arrival of Western dog breeds and new modes of dog keeping, which spread throughout the world with Western imperialism. He highlights how dogs joined with humans to create the modern imperial world and how, in turn, imperialism shaped dogs' bodies and their relationship with humans through its impact on dog-breeding and dog-keeping practices that pervade much of the world today. In a book that is both enlightening and entertaining, Skabelund focuses on actual and metaphorical dogs in a variety of contexts: the rhetorical pairing of the Western "colonial dog" with native canines; subsequent campaigns against indigenous canines in the imperial realm; the creation, maintenance, and in some cases restoration of Japanese dog breeds, including the Shiba Inu; the mobilization of military dogs, both real and fictional; and the emergence of Japan as a "pet superpower" in the second half of the twentieth century. Through this provocative account, Skabelund demonstrates how animals generally and canines specifically have contributed to the creation of our shared history, and how certain dogs have subtly influenced how that history is told. Generously illustrated with both color and black-and-white images, Empire of Dogs shows that human-canine relations often expose how people—especially those with power and wealth—use animals to define, regulate, and enforce political and social boundaries between themselves and other humans, especially in imperial contexts.

The Pawprints of History

Dogs in the Course of Human Events

The Pawprints of History

The Pawprints of History shines a new light on a favorite subject -- the relationship between humans and their four-legged best friends. Stanley Coren, a renowned expert on dog-human interactions, has combed the annals of history and found captivating stories of how dogs have lent a helping paw and influenced the actions, decisions, and fates of well-known figures from every era and throughout the world. As history's great figures strut across the stage, Coren guides us from the wings, adoringly picking out the canine cameos and giving every dog of distinction its day. In this unparalleled chronicle, we see how Florence Nightingale's chance encounter with a wounded dog changed her life by leading her to the vocation of nursing. We learn why Dr. Freud's Chow Chow attended all of his therapy sessions and how the life of the Fifth Dalai Lama was saved by a dog who shared his bed. Dogs have even found their way to the battlefield -- great military leaders such as Robert the Bruce and Omar Bradley have shared their lives, exploits, and gunfire with dogs. From Wagner, who admitted that one of the arias in the opera Siegfried was "written" by one of his dogs, to the dogs that inspired and lived with Presidents Lincoln, Roosevelt, Johnson, and Clinton, these loving canines do double duty as loyal pets and creative muses. From war to art, across the spectrum of human endeavor and achievement, there often stands, not only at his side but leading the way, man's beloved "best friend." For those who believe that behind every great person is a good dog, the uplifting stories in The Pawprints of History will be a lasting delight.

Lone Survivors

How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth

Lone Survivors

A leading researcher on human evolution proposes a new and controversial theory of how our species came to be In this groundbreaking and engaging work of science, world-renowned paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer sets out a new theory of humanity's origin, challenging both the multiregionalists (who hold that modern humans developed from ancient ancestors in different parts of the world) and his own "out of Africa" theory, which maintains that humans emerged rapidly in one small part of Africa and then spread to replace all other humans within and outside the continent. Stringer's new theory, based on archeological and genetic evidence, holds that distinct humans coexisted and competed across the African continent—exchanging genes, tools, and behavioral strategies. Stringer draws on analyses of old and new fossils from around the world, DNA studies of Neanderthals (using the full genome map) and other species, and recent archeological digs to unveil his new theory. He shows how the most sensational recent fossil findings fit with his model, and he questions previous concepts (including his own) of modernity and how it evolved. Lone Survivors will be the definitive account of who and what we were, and will change perceptions about our origins and about what it means to be human.

Handbook of Applied Dog Behavior and Training, Adaptation and Learning

Handbook of Applied Dog Behavior and Training, Adaptation and Learning

Twenty-five years of study and experience went into the making ofthis one-of-a-kind reference. Veterinarians, animal scientists, dogowners, trainers, consultants, and counsellors will find this booka benchmark reference and handbook concerning positive, humanemanagement and control of dogs. Reflecting the author's extensive work with dogs, this bookpromises thorough explanations of topics, and proven behaviouralstrategies that have been designed, tested, and used by the author.More than 50 figures and tables illustrate this unique andsignificant contribution to dog behaviour, training, andlearning.

The Scottish Terrier - A Complete Anthology of the Dog

The Scottish Terrier - A Complete Anthology of the Dog

The Scottish Terrier - A Complete Anthology of the Dog gathers together all the best early writing on the breed from our library of scarce, out-of-print antiquarian books and documents and reprints it in a quality, modern edition. This anthology includes chapters taken from a comprehensive range of books, many of them now rare and much sought-after works, all of them written by renowned breed experts of their day. These books are treasure troves of information about the breed - The physical points, temperaments, and special abilities are given; celebrated dogs are discussed and pictured; and the history of the breed and pedigrees of famous champions are also provided. The contents were well illustrated with numerous photographs of leading and famous dogs of that era and these are all reproduced to the highest quality. Books used include: My Dog And I by H. W. Huntington (1897), British Dogs by W. D. Drury (1903), Hutchinson's Dog Encyclopaedia by Walter Hutchinson (1935) and many others.