Field Guide to Spiritual Warfare

Pull the Impossible

Field Guide to Spiritual Warfare

Michael Norton’s A Field Guide for Spiritual Warfare is an highly engaging text, filled with vital counsel on cooperating with the Holy Spirit in taking the Mark 16 commission—sharing the Gospel, healing the sick, and casting out demons—to the streets. As Norton stresses and as his own ministry attests, the focus is not primarily on deliverance, but on the Gospel being preached; signs and wonders will naturally follow those who believe. A true equipping tool, A Field Guide advocates both the authority of the believer and a crucial dependence on the Holy Spirit, and provides a model for deliverance ministry operating in the darkest places, “making the impossible bow down to the name of Jesus!”

Bear Archery Traditional Bows: A Chronological History

Bear Archery Traditional Bows: A Chronological History

To the Bear Archery traditional bow enthusiast and to the archery community at large, this book Bear Archery Traditional Bows: A Chronological History (1949–2015) represents a singular compilation of the chronological history of Bear Archery traditional bow production through the Bear Archery Company’s full timeline. This illustrated reference manual not only preserves the history and heritage of Bear Archery traditional bow production since 1949, it serves as a helpful reference to any and all archers interested in collecting and dating their vintage Bear Archery traditional bows. Each chapter covers a detailed chronology of factory production specifications for each specific bow model or group of related models. It includes photos of bow models for almost every year. The best part is this: at the end of each chapter, there is a table that allows readers to search out the characteristics of their bow by year, AMO length, riser material, medallion, limb glass colors, overlay colors, limb tip colors and where applicable, the two-digit serial number prefix.

Conquering the Impossible

My 12,000-Mile Journey Around the Arctic Circle

Conquering the Impossible

In August 2002, Mike Horn set out on a mission that bordered on the impossible: to travel 12,000 miles around the globe at the Arctic Circle - alone, against all prevailing winds and currents, and without motorized transportation. Conquering the Impossible is the gripping account of Horn's grueling 27-month expedition by sail and by foot through extreme Arctic conditions that nearly cost him his life on numerous occasions. Enduring temperatures that ranged to as low as -95 degrees Fahrenheit, Horn battled hazards including shifting and unstable ice that gave way and plunged him into frigid waters, encounters with polar bears so close that he felt their breath on his face, severe frostbite in his fingers, and a fire that destroyed all of his equipment and nearly burned him alive. Complementing the sheer adrenaline of Horn's narrative are the isolated but touching human encounters the adventurer has with the hardy individuals who inhabit one of the remotest corners of the earth. From an Inuit who teaches him how to build an igloo to an elderly Russian left behind when the Soviets evacuated his remote Arctic town, Horn finds camaraderie, kindness, and assistance to help him survive the most unforgiving conditions. This awe-inspiring account is a page-turner and an Arctic survival tale in one. Most of all, it's a testament to one man's unrelenting desire to push the boundaries of human endurance.

De Bow's Review

De Bow's Review


Cloud of the Impossible

Negative Theology and Planetary Entanglement

Cloud of the Impossible

The experience of the impossible churns up in our epoch whenever a collective dream turns to trauma: politically, sexually, economically, and with a certain ultimacy, ecologically. Out of an ancient theological lineage, the figure of the cloud comes to convey possibility in the face of the impossible. An old mystical nonknowing of God now hosts a current knowledge of uncertainty, of indeterminate and interdependent outcomes, possibly catastrophic. Yet the connectivity and collectivity of social movements, of the fragile, unlikely webs of an alternative notion of existence, keep materializing--a haunting hope, densely entangled, suggesting a more convivial, relational world. Catherine Keller brings process, feminist, and ecopolitical theologies into transdisciplinary conversation with continental philosophy, the quantum entanglements of a "participatory universe," and the writings of Nicholas of Cusa, Walt Whitman, A. N. Whitehead, Gilles Deleuze, and Judith Butler, to develop a "theopoetics of nonseparable difference." Global movements, personal embroilments, religious diversity, the inextricable relations of humans and nonhumans--these phenomena, in their unsettling togetherness, are exceeding our capacity to know and manage. By staging a series of encounters between the nonseparable and the nonknowable, Keller shows what can be born from our cloudiest entanglement.

The Impossible Lisa Barnes

The Impossible Lisa Barnes

Being twelve isn't easy. But Anika Scott, who has joined her parents as a missionary in Kenya, uses her faith and trust in God and His words as guidance to help her through her adolescent problems. Join Anika in her exciting and often dangerous adventures where using God and her own ingenuity she makes discoveries about the truth in the world. When Lisa Barnes arrives at the missionary with her parents, Anika is amazed that she cannot love the exotic wilderness. Instead the girl is frightened of the local wildlife and generally hates everything about this beautiful land. Anika and her friends devise a plan to make the impossible girl leave once and for all. But is that God's plan?

The Impossible Adventure

Journey to the Far Amazon

The Impossible Adventure