The Idea of Latin America

The Idea of Latin America is a geo-political manifesto which insists on the need to leave behind an idea which belonged to the nation-building mentality of nineteenth-century Europe.

The Idea of Latin America

The Idea of Latin America is a geo-political manifesto which insists on the need to leave behind an idea which belonged to the nation-building mentality of nineteenth-century Europe. Charts the history of the concept of Latin America from its emergence in Europe in the second half of the nineteenth century through various permutations to the present day. Asks what is at stake in the survival of an idea which subdivides the Americas. Reinstates the indigenous peoples and migrations excluded by the image of a homogenous Latin America with defined borders. Insists on the pressing need to leave behind an idea which belonged to the nation-building mentality of nineteenth-century Europe.

The Idea of Race in Latin America 1870 1940

Financed by a three-year Swiss National Research Fellowship, she had decided
to use this campus as a base for her research on race relations and the idea of
race in Latin America. Her presence served as a catalyst in the creation of a ...

The Idea of Race in Latin America  1870 1940

From the mid-nineteenth century until the 1930s, many Latin American leaders faced a difficult dilemma regarding the idea of race. On the one hand, they aspired to an ever-closer connection to Europe and North America, where, during much of this period, "scientific" thought condemned nonwhite races to an inferior category. Yet, with the heterogeneous racial makeup of their societies clearly before them and a growing sense of national identity impelling consideration of national futures, Latin American leaders hesitated. What to do? Whom to believe? Latin American political and intellectual leaders' sometimes anguished responses to these dilemmas form the subject of The Idea of Race in Latin America. Thomas Skidmore, Aline Helg, and Alan Knight have each contributed chapters that succinctly explore various aspects of the story in Brazil, Argentina, Cuba, and Mexico. While keenly alert to the social and economic differences that distinguish one Latin American society from another, each author has also addressed common issues that Richard Graham ably draws together in a brief introduction. Written in a style that will make it accessible to the undergraduate, this book will appeal as well to the sophisticated scholar.

France Mexico and Informal Empire in Latin America 1820 1867

have focussed on the professed goals of Louis-Napoléon and Chevalier quoted
above, particularly their implications for the idea of “Latin America”. In an
influential argument, John Leddy Phelan associated panLatinism with the
imperialism of ...

France  Mexico and Informal Empire in Latin America  1820 1867

This book explores French imperialism in Latin America in the nineteenth century, taking Mexico as a case study. The standard narrative of nineteenth-century imperialism in Latin America is one of US expansion and British informal influence. However, it was France, not Britain, which made the most concerted effort to counter US power through Louis-Napoléon’s military intervention in Mexico, begun in 1862, which created an empire on the North American continent under the Habsburg Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian. Despite its significance to French and Latin American history, this French imperial project is invariably described as an “illusion”, an “adventure” or a “mirage”. This book challenges these conclusions and places the French intervention in Mexico within the context of informal empire. It analyses French and Mexican ideas about monarchy in Latin America; responses to US expansion and the development of anti-Americanism and pan-Latinism; the consolidation of Mexican conservatism; and, finally, the collaboration of some Mexican elites with French imperialism. An important dimension of the relationship between Mexico and France, explored in the book, is the transatlantic and transnational context in which it developed, where competing conceptions of Mexico and France as nations, the role of Europe and the United States in the Americas and the idea of Latin America itself were challenged and debated.

The I of the Camera

This idea of the movement emerged hand-in-hand with the movement's
developing practices, and hand-in-hand, as well, with the idea of Latin America
as a distinct historical entity. In Pick's view, the idea of a distinctive Latin America
identity ...

The  I  of the Camera

This second edition of William Rothman's classic includes fourteen new essays and a new foreword.

Latin America

The Allure and Power of an Idea Mauricio Tenorio-Trillo. TWO Iberismo and
Latinité: A bit more elaboration on the intellectual milieu to which the “Latin” in
Latin America has belonged, or an explanation of the multiple lives of iberismo
and ...

Latin America

“Latin America” is a concept firmly entrenched in its philosophical, moral, and historical meanings. And yet, Mauricio Tenorio-Trillo argues in this landmark book, it is an obsolescent racial-cultural idea that ought to have vanished long ago with the banishment of racial theory. Latin America: The Allure and Power of an Idea makes this case persuasively. Tenorio-Trillo builds the book on three interlocking steps: first, an intellectual history of the concept of Latin America in its natural historical habitat—mid-nineteenth-century redefinitions of empire and the cultural, political, and economic intellectualism; second, a serious and uncompromising critique of the current “Latin Americanism”—which circulates in United States–based humanities and social sciences; and, third, accepting that we might actually be stuck with “Latin America,” Tenorio-Trillo charts a path forward for the writing and teaching of Latin American history. Accessible and forceful, rich in historical research and specificity, the book offers a distinctive, conceptual history of Latin America and its many connections and intersections of political and intellectual significance. Tenorio-Trillo’s book is a masterpiece of interdisciplinary scholarship.

Diversity of Capitalisms in Latin America

“One of the definite merits of this book is to cleverly mix a theoretical breakthrough with a meticulous historical and empirical account of the transformations of some key Latin American countries.

Diversity of Capitalisms in Latin America

“One of the definite merits of this book is to cleverly mix a theoretical breakthrough with a meticulous historical and empirical account of the transformations of some key Latin American countries. First, it is at the frontier of a research agenda initiated back to the end of the 1970s, second it clearly distinguishes between an ideal-type approach and the complexity of any specific national configuration and its transformation in history. Furthermore, the author provides decisive arguments against a pure economic determinism too frequently supposed to govern institutions building and reforms. Last but not least, the book culminates by an impressive analysis of the crises that quite any Latin America society experiences at the end the 2010s.” -Robert Boyer, Institut des Amériques, Paris, France. This book defends the idea that there are significant structural and institutional differences between the countries in Latin America. Building off the results of a four-year research project, Bizberg argues against the idea that in Latin America there is one single type of capitalism—a hierarchical one—that is entangled in a vicious cycle. Rather, there are clusters of countries that have had similar historical trajectories, analogous structures, or comparable reactions to changes to the world economy, but have not all followed the same mode of development. Just as analysts have found a variety of capitalisms in developed countries, it is possible to identify the emergence of different types of capitalism in Latin America since the 1980s debt crisis. These varieties of capitalism are defined according to categories—including the articulation to the world economy, the role of the State, the structure of the political system and the action of civil society—which give rise to distinct wage relations, comprising the industrial relations system and the welfare regime.

Latin America s Middle Class

Designed for classroom use and nonspecialist readers, this collection brings together some of the most influential texts ever written about Latin America's middle class.

Latin America s Middle Class

Designed for classroom use and nonspecialist readers, this collection brings together some of the most influential texts ever written about Latin America s middle class."

Literary and Cultural Relations between Brazil and Mexico

LatinAmericanism becomes alatentshadow identity that avoidstheabsolute
predominance of the nationstate by disturbing ... It also becomes
acountertradition that quietlyrefuses the idea of Latin America asafuturetask by
focusingonperforming ...

Literary and Cultural Relations between Brazil and Mexico

Joining a timely conversation within the field of intra-American literature, this study takes a fresh look at Latin America by locating fragments and making evident the mostly untold story of horizontal (south-south) contacts across a multilingual, multicultural continent.

A Companion to Latin American History

Montevideo. Ardao, A. (1993) América Latina y la latinidad. ... Espinosa, A. M. (
1919) América Espafiola, o Hispano América: El término “América Latina” es
erréneo. Comisaria Regia ... Mignolo, W. (2005) The Idea of Latin America.
Blackwell ...

A Companion to Latin American History

The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest

Problems in Modern Latin American History

Liberalism, a new set of political ideas associated with the French Revolution and
the newly independent United States of America, offered a persuasive, ready-
made justification for Latin American independence. (We will explore liberalism's
 ...

Problems in Modern Latin American History

This is a completely revised and updated edition of SR Books' classic text, Problems in Modern Latin American History. This book has been brought up to date by Professors John Charles Chasteen and James A. Wood to reflect current scholarship and to maximize the book's utility as a teaching tool. The book is divided into 13 chapters, with each chapter dedicated to addressing a particular 'problem' in modern Latin America-issues that complement most survey texts. Each chapter includes an interpretive essay that frames a clear central issue for students to tackle, along with excerpts from historical writing that advance alternative-or even conflicting-interpretations. In addition, each chapter contains primary documents for students to analyze in relation to the interpretive issues. This primary material includes passages of Latin American fiction in translation, biographical sketches, and images. Designed as a supplemental text for survey courses on Latin American history, this book's provocative 'problems' approach will engage students, evoke lively classroom discussion, and promote critical thinking.