The Handley Page Victor

The book charts changes as they occurred in the aeronautical industry from the 1950's onwards and, as such, it should appeal to both individuals who were caught up in events at the time as well as students of the era.

The Handley Page Victor

Some aircraft inspire passion, others nostalgia, but others, often the unsung heroes, are more of a connoisseur's choice. The Handley Page Victor easily falls into this last category. In this follow-up to _The Handley Page Victor: The History and Development of a Classic Jet, _ Volumes _I_ and _II, _ Roger Brooks extends his earlier historical narratives, this time offering an action-packed and riveting memoir of a career spanning forty years. The book charts changes as they occurred in the aeronautical industry from the 1950's onwards and, as such, it should appeal to both individuals who were caught up in events at the time as well as students of the era. In addition to the aircraft itself, Roger worked extensively with tankers, refuelling the Victor as it took part in a variety of operations in the fraught Cold War era. He brings all aspects of his career to life across these pages, offering the kind of details that can only be gained by first-hand experience.

The Handley Page Victor

This is the ultimate reference book on this famous and much-loved aircraft. 7 Colour Profiles by David Windle, 22 Colour Photographs, 170 Mono Photographs and 66 Diagrams

The Handley Page Victor

The Handley Page Victor was the longest serving V-Bomber with the RAF. It was conceived in 1945 and after much research and development the Mk 1 entered service in the late 1950s to become part of the UK's nuclear deterrent force. It could fly faster, higher and further than any comparable aircraft of that era. It boasted a unique crescent wing shape and was the most handsome of the three types of V bomber. It was later extensively modified to become the RAF's main tanker aircraft for in-flight refuelling and served in that role from 1965 until 1993. This is the most authoritative reference to the aircraft yet to be published. Commencing with the first design trials and test flights, each chapter includes personnel recollections from pilots and design staff, and is solidly based on official government and company reports, many of which are included. The text explains the introduction and operation once it was in RAF service and explains the various roles that it undertook and the many experiments and trials that took place to perfect the various systems required for these roles. The Mk 2 was a much improved model and many were adapted for tanker duties. All is fully explained with copious diagrams and rarely seen photographs. Lengthy appendices detail Aircraft Accident Reports and other unique information that has never been published. This is the ultimate reference book on this famous and much-loved aircraft. 7 Colour Profiles by David Windle, 22 Colour Photographs, 170 Mono Photographs and 66 Diagrams

Handley Page Victor Volume 2

The first volume of Roger Brooks detailed reference to the Victor covers the conception, design and test-flying of the prototype HP 80 and then the production and operation of the Mark 1 in its many roles.

Handley Page Victor   Volume 2

The first volume of Roger Brooks detailed reference to the Victor covers the conception, design and test-flying of the prototype HP 80 and then the production and operation of the Mark 1 in its many roles. This second volume completes the history of the aircraft by describing the improved Mark 2 that was primarily conceived to carry Britains Blue Steel nuclear deterrent. The aircraft was to be re-engined with the Rolls-Royce Conway and the enlargement of the air intakes in the wing are one of the more noticeable external differences on these models. When the V-Bomber Force lost its primary raison detre as the delivery vehicle for the nuclear deterrent, the Victors were adapted for the air-to-air refueling tanker role, a task they successfully carried out until their airframe life was exhausted.This volume also includes lengthy appendices on all Marks that include a mass of detailed historical information, the testing of many new systems, modifications throughout service life, the authors first-hand experiences as a Victor crew chief, operational records and a complete list of all Victor accidents with a detailed analysis and official reports.

Hadley Page Victor Owners Workshop Manual

It also served as a strategic reconnaissance platform and as an air-to-air refuelling tanker. This manual showcases two former Falklands and Gulf War veteran aircraft.

Hadley Page Victor Owners  Workshop Manual

The Handley Page Victor was the third and final V-bomber to be operated by the RAF during the Cold War as part of the UK's airborne nuclear deterrent, carrying the Blue Steel stand-off nuclear weapon. It also served as a strategic reconnaissance platform and as an air-to-air refuelling tanker. This manual showcases two former Falklands and Gulf War veteran aircraft. The Victor was one of three new types of aircraft ordered for the re-equipment of the RAF under the "V"-bomber programme. It was designed to a similar requirement as the Avro Vulcan but represented a different if equally bold approach to the problem of producing a four-jet bomber capable of carrying heavy loads at high subsonic speeds for great distances at altitudes up to 50,000ft. The prototype first flew on 24 December 1952, with the first production aircraft flying on 1 February 1956. The first Victor B.1 entered service in November 1957 and a total of 49 B.1 and B.1A aircraft were delivered to the RAF, equipping four squadrons and the OCU. With the demise of the Valiant in 1965, the Victor was chosen as a replacement for the RAF's AAR capability, initially as a two-point tanker but later as a three-point tanker. All conversions were completed by Avro at Woodford. Meanwhile, the Victor B.1 was superseded by the significantly improved performance of the B.2, which was designed to carry the Blue Steel stand-off nuclear weapons. The first production B.2 aircraft made its first flight in February 1959 and entered service in October 1961. In addition to the B.2 variant, the B/SR.2 entered service with 543 Squadron at Wyton in December 1965 and became Bomber Command's standard strategic reconnaissance aircraft in place of the Valiant B(PR).1. By the end of 1968, the Victor ceased to serve as a bomber as it was not coping with the low-level stresses - instead, it was replaced by the Vulcan in this role. However, the Victor B.2 aircraft were to find and new and important role within the RAF in which they would remain in service into the 1990s. The Victor K.2 was evolved as a replacement for the older K.1 and K.1A tanker aircraft which had entered service back in 1965. The first K.2 conversion made its first flight at Woodford on 1 March 1972 and entered service with 55 Squadron in July 1975. Originally, 29 conversions had been ordered but this was reduced by the Treasury and only 24 were eventually completed. It was during the Falklands Conflict that the Victor K.2 made such an outstanding contribution to the campaign, flying over 3,000-hours. Victor aircraft based at Ascension Island made more than 600 air-to-air refuelling sorties in support of Vulcan, Nimrod, Hercules and Harrier aircraft. However, their most famous contribution was the air-to-air refuelling of the single Vulcan bombers during the 'Black Buck' operations which highlighted their effective career. Later, the Victor K.2 played a pivotal role during Operation Granby during Gulf War 1. However, this activity in theatre drained the remaining life from the already tired airframes and the end of the Victor was in sight. The last of the V-bombers in RAF service, the Victor K.2 was finally withdrawn in October 1993, being replaced by the VC10 and Tristar tanker aircraft. The book will feature two former Falklands and Gulf War veteran aircraft: XL231 'Lusty Lindy' maintained in a 'running' order at the Yorkshire Air Museum at Elvington; XM715 'Teasin Tina/Victor Meldrew' maintained in a 'running' order with the British Aviation Heritage Centre at Bruntingthorpe.

Handley Page Victor

Andrew Brookes is an aviation author and retired RAF Victor pilot and flew the Victor to the very end of its career in the late 80s. This is the first new edition of his classic work on the Victor to be available for nearly a decade.

Handley Page Victor

The Handley Page Victor was originally designed to be part of Britain's nuclear deterrent in the 1950s. While none of the British V-bombers (Victor, Valiant, and Vulcan) was ever involved in a nuclear conflict, these sturdy long-range aircraft proved to be adaptable for a variety of roles and continued in service for over fifty years. The Victor spent much of its career on maritime patrol over the North Sea during the Cold War era. Eventually the large-bodied aircraft was seen as an ideal fuel tanker with mid-air refueling capacity. It was in this role that the Victor had its last moments of glory during the Falklands War. Andrew Brookes is an aviation author and retired RAF Victor pilot and flew the Victor to the very end of its career in the late 80s. This is the first new edition of his classic work on the Victor to be available for nearly a decade.

Handley Page Victor

This book on the Handley Page Victor V-Bomber covers design and development and parts of the type's service history. Numerous photos are published here for the first time.

Handley Page Victor

The Handley Page Victor was the third and final aircraft in Britain's V-bomber fleet, built to carry the nuclear deterrent during the Cold War. Built during the 1950s and 1960s, the bomber was designed to fly higher and faster than contemporary fighter aircraft so that it could penetrate Soviet airspace with its deadly load unopposed. In later years, it switched to a conventional role and saw service during the Falklands War in the 1980s and 1991 Gulf War before withdrawal later that year. This book on the Handley Page Victor V-Bomber covers design and development and parts of the type's service history. Numerous photos are published here for the first time.

Handley Page Halifax

This book will be a worthy addition to the collection of the historian, to the modeler and for those who served in the Halifax squadrons or their families.

Handley Page Halifax

The Handley Page Halifax, along with the Avro Lancaster and the Short Stirling, was one of the three heavy bombers employed by The Royal Air Force Bomber Command in its aerial offensive against the Axis in W.W.II. Although overshadowed by the legendary Lancaster, the Halifax played a major role in the night bombing campaign, in antisubmarine operations, meteorological reconnaissance, transport, and towing gliders in airborne operations. In all, over 6,000 Halifax aircraft were produced and these were flown in over 75,000 missions. It served from 1941 until finally retired in 1952. At one time during their service in the RAF Bomber Command all 15 RCAF Bomber Squadrons and three Heavy Conversion Units were equipped with the Halifax, several operating only the Halifax. Although some squadrons began reequipping with the Lancaster beginning in late 1943, the Halifax was the mainstay of these squadrons from 1942 to the end of the war in night bombing and mine laying operations. This book documents the development of the Halifax aircraft from its inception during the expansion of the RAF Bomber Command in the late 1930s until production ended in 1946. Its service with RCAF 6 Group of Bomber Command, and its operations with all 15 RCAF Squadrons is related, with representative photographs. A complete description of each version of the aircraft is presented, along with accurate multi-view line drawings and photographs. The aircraft defensive and offensive armament is described as well as color schemes and markings. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to modeling the Halifax with descriptions of kits and decal markings that have been produced. This book will be a worthy addition to the collection of the historian, to the modeler and for those who served in the Halifax squadrons or their families.

Handley Page Halifax

As a military aircraft the Handley Page Halifax was unique: it served in every conceivable role with distinction.

Handley Page Halifax

As a military aircraft the Handley Page Halifax was unique: it served in every conceivable role with distinction. With RAF Bomber Command, it flew no fewer than 75,532 bombing sorties over Germany. With Coastal Command, it mounted anti-submarine and shipping attacks,and undertook much overlooked but vital meteorological duties, including the historic D-Day weather measurements. The Halifax also undertook covert 'Special Duties', dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines, including the team that attempted to assassinate the notorious SS commander, Reinhard Heydrich. This study shows how the Halifax was one of the four heavy bomber designs that won favour from the British Air Ministry's changing design parameters in the 1930s which came about due to growing international tensions.

The Handley Page Halifax Mk I

... Harold Stanley BROWN, LOrne Edwin BROWN, Robert BUCKLAND, George
BUCKLEY, Hubert Donald CoLEMAN, Noel Eric Henry COLLINGE, Robert Victor
COLLINS, John COLLINS, Walter Norman COOPER, Albert Edward COOPER, ...

The Handley Page Halifax Mk  I

From before the end of the Great War the United Kingdom had coveted long-range bombers that were able to bomb the continent. Bomber Command, formed in 1936, was a major and vital organisation within the RAF. While the twin-engine Vickers Wellington was about to be introduced, a new generation of four-engine bombers was already under development. The concept was not new but, in the middle of the 1930s, technological progress with engines and airframe materials gave the opportunity for many air forces to develop their long-range bombers. It was also a matter of prestige as the long-range bomber, also known as the ÔstrategicÕ bomber, was not accessible to all. In the middle of the Ô30s, the USA and Germany had various projects under way and even Italy joined in. When the war broke out, the UK had two projects of ÔstrategicÕ bombers on the table - the Short Stirling and the Handley Page Halifax. Built in small numbers, less than 100 (of the global production of over 6000 copies), the Halifax Mk.I despite its shortcomings, was the first but the essential step to allow the Halifax to reach maturity, goal achived in 1943 only. This study is rich of photographs, appendices, document and two colour profiles.

Victor Boys

Victor Boys tells the story of all the great things that were achieved, recounted first hand by the operators themselves, aircrew and ground crew.

Victor Boys

The Handley Page Victor was the third of the three V Bombers and the most long lasting, serving in the RAF until 1993, and still doing invaluable service in the first Iraq war. Moreover, in 1982 it was only the Victor tanker fleet based on Ascension Island that made possible the Vulcan Black Buck bombing of Port Stanley airfield and the long-range reconnaissance of Argentina by Nimrods. Victor Boys tells the story of all the great things that were achieved, recounted first hand by the operators themselves, aircrew and ground crew. Starting with accounts by test pilot Johnny Allam, who undertook the major development of the aircraft, through its work as a nuclear bomber during the cold war, testing Blue Steel in Australia, to its superb performance during the Falklands war and later as a first class air-to-air refueling tanker and vital support tool for fighters and other aircraft. Published to coincide with the Victor's 60th anniversary, the gripping text is superbly illustrated with photographs from the operators themselves, never released before.