The Greek World After Alexander 323 30 BC

An appraisal of the momentous military and political changes after the era of Alexander, this book considers developments in literature, religion, philosophy, and science, and establishes how far they are presented as radical departures ...

The Greek World After Alexander 323   30 BC

The Greek World After Alexander 323–30 BC examines social changes in the old and new cities of the Greek world and in the new post-Alexandrian kingdoms. An appraisal of the momentous military and political changes after the era of Alexander, this book considers developments in literature, religion, philosophy, and science, and establishes how far they are presented as radical departures from the culture of Classical Greece or were continuous developments from it. Graham Shipley explores the culture of the Hellenistic world in the context of the social divisions between an educated elite and a general population at once more mobile and less involved in the political life of the Greek city.

The Greek World 479 323 BC

... C.3000–330 BC Amélie Kuhrt GREECE IN THE MAKING 1200–479 BC
Second Edition Robin Osborne THE GREEK WORLD 479–323 BC Fourth Edition
Simon Hornblower THE GREEK WORLD AFTER ALEXANDER 32330 BC
Graham ...

The Greek World 479 323 BC

The Greek World 479-323 BC has been an indispensable guide to classical Greek history since its first publication nearly thirty years ago. Now Simon Hornblower has comprehensively revised and partly rewritten his original text, bringing it up-to-date for yet another generation of readers. In particular, this fourth edition takes full account of recent and detailed scholarship on Greek poleis across the Hellenic world, allowing for further development of the key theme of regional variety across the Mediterranean and beyond. Other extensive changes include a new sub-chapter on Islands, a completely updated bibliography, and revised citation of epigraphic material relating to the fourth-century BC. With valuable coverage of the broader Mediterranean world in which Greek culture flourished, as well as close examination of Athens, Sparta, and the other great city-states of Greece itself, this fourth edition of a classic work is a more essential read than ever before.

Western Civilization

105) Suggestions for Further Reading generAl works For good introductions to
the Hellenistic era, see P. Green, The Hellenistic Age: A Short History (New York,
2007), and G. Shipley, The Greek World After Alexander, 32330 b.c. (London, ...

Western Civilization

Best-selling author Jackson Spielvogel has helped over one million students learn about the present by exploring the past. Spielvogel's engaging narrative weaves the political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, cultural, and military aspects of history into a gripping story that is as memorable as it is instructive. Updated to reflect current scholarship, WESTERN CIVILIZATION, 10th Edition, includes more than 150 maps and excerpts of more than 250 primary sources that enliven the past while introducing students to the source material of historical scholarship. Additionally, the text is illustrated with more than 400 photographs that add visual context. A variety of pedagogical tools, including focus and critical thinking questions, primary source features with assignable questions, and end-of-chapter study aids, make this edition accessible to any learning style. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Sanctuaries and the Sacred in the Ancient Greek World

A. D. Nock, Conversion: The Old and the New in Religion from Alexander the
Great to Augustine of Hippo (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1933). G. Shipley,
The Greek World after Alexander 32330 BC (London: Routledge, 2000). XIV.

Sanctuaries and the Sacred in the Ancient Greek World

The first chapters outline important themes and issues, including locations and their meanings, defining features of sanctuaries, the relationship between structure and ritual, political as well as religious functions, transformations over time, and the activities and experiences of the individual. These themes are linked to historic and specific sanctuaries, notably Olympia and Delphi, as examples of major international sanctuaries; Samos and Poseidonia, as urban sanctuaries in different parts of the Greek world; and the acropolis in Athens. Final chapters trace the consequences of the Roman conquest, the triumph of Christianity, as well as the impact of Turks, travelers, archaeologists, and tourists on these sites. Written in a clear style and richly illustrated, this 2005 book is intended for students and provides an accessible yet authoritative introduction to the material aspects of ancient Greek sanctuaries and the ritual activities which took place there. It includes a lengthy glossary and a chapter bibliography.

The Cambridge Dictionary of Classical Civilization

This Guide, with over 1700 entries and 500 illustrations, is a key reference work on both, covering all the main branches of ancient literature, art and institutions.

The Cambridge Dictionary of Classical Civilization

Few historical epochs have influenced the development of civilization to the extent that those of ancient Greece and Rome have. This Guide, with over 1700 entries and 500 illustrations, is a key reference work on both, covering all the main branches of ancient literature, art and institutions. In addition, it explores traditionally neglected areas such as dress, housing, minority groups and social relations. Ranging from post-Bronze Age Greece to the later Roman Empire, it surveys not only ancient Greece and Rome, but discusses those cultures with which Greeks and Romans exchanged information and culture (e.g., Phoenicians, Celts and Jews) as well as the remote peoples with whom they were in contact (e.g., Persia, China and India). Graham Shipley is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and chair of the Council of University Classical Departments as well as the Sparta and Laconia Committee of the British School of Athens. His publications include A History of Samos and The Greek World after Alexander. John Vanderspoel is Professor of Late Antiquity at the University of Calgary, where he was initially appointed in 1985. His publications include Themistius and the Imperial Court (1995) and numerous journal articles and chapters on Roman history, intellectual and religious developments in the Roman imperial period and Roman Britain. David Mattingly is a Fellow of the British Academy and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. His publications include monographs on Tripolitania (1995) and An Atlas of Roman Britain (2002); edited volumes including Economies beyond Agriculture in the Classical World (2001), Life, Death and Entertainment in the Roman World (1999), and Dialogues in Roman Imperialism (supplement to Journal of Roman Archaeology, 1997). Lin Foxhall is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Her publications include co-edited volumes on masculinity in the ancient world (Thinking Men and When Men were Men 1998), on ancient law (Greek Law in its Political Setting 1996), and the ancient economy (Money, Labour and Land 2002) as well as many journal articles and chapters on Greek social relations, gender, agriculture, field survey and economy.

Ancient Greece

From the Archaic Period to the Death of Alexander the Great Britannica
Educational Publishing Kuiper, Kathleen ... (eds), The Fifth Century B.C., vol. 5,
2nd ed. ... (2002),- and Graham Shipley, The Greek World After Alexander, 323
30 BC.

Ancient Greece

From Archaic times to the reign of Alexander the Great, Greek unity was tenuous, yet Ancient Greece was a place where culture flourished and intellectual achievement knew no bounds. Ancient Greek ideas on philosophy, politics, science, and the arts anticipate many of our own, and in some ways, remain unparalleled today. This book recounts the events that were instrumental to the development of this storied civilization and the indelible legacies it has left behind. A detailed appendix supplements the narrative with in-depth discussion on the Pre-Greek societies that fueled the imagination and gave birth to an enduring body of Greek mythology.

Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras

III: 336–167 B.C. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), pp. 230–1; Habicht,
Athens from Alexander to Antony, pp. 91, 95–7; G. Shipley, The Greek World after
Alexander, 32330 B.C. (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 123–4; G. J. Oliver, War,
 ...

Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras

This volume in The Edinburgh Leventis Studies series collects the papers presented at the sixth A. G. Leventis conference, It engages with new research and new approaches to the Greek past, and brings the fruits of that research to a wider audience.

Egypt Greece and Rome

he Hellenistic age is the period from the reign ofAlexander (336–323 bc) to the
conquest of Egypt by Rome in 30 bc, a span of some ... See also Graham Shipley
, The Greek World after Alexander, 32330 B.C, New York and London, 2000.) ...

Egypt  Greece  and Rome

Covering more than four thousand years of ancient history, from the early Egyptians to the dawn of Byzantium, an illustrated introduction to the Mediterranean's three major civilizations examines their links and traces their influence up to the present day. UP.

The Spartans

ConstructingGreek Political and Social History to323BC, 2nd edn,London P
OWELL ,A.(1989) ed. ... Chasse etérotique dansla Grèce ancienne, Paris S
HIPLEY ,G.(2000) The Greek World After Alexander 32330 BC, London &New
York ...

The Spartans

The Spartan legend has inspired and captivated subsequent generations with evidence of its legacy found in both the Roman and British Empires. The Spartans are our ancestors, every bit as much as the Athenians. But while Athens promoted democracy, individualism, culture and society, their great rivals Sparta embodied militarism, totalitarianism, segregation and brutal repression. As ruthless as they were self-sacrificing, their devastatingly successful war rituals made the Spartans the ultimate fighting force, epitomized by Thermopylae. While slave masters to the Helots for over three centuries, Spartan women, such as Helen of Troy, were free to indulge in education, dance and sport. Interspersed with the personal biographies of leading figures, and based on thirty years' research, Paul Cartledge's The Spartans tracks the people from 480 to 360 BC charting Sparta's progression from the Great Power of the Aegean Greek world to its ultimate demise.

Ancient Greece

A brief survey of the many religious traditions of the Greco-Roman and Near
Eastern world from the fourth century B.C. to the fourth century a.d. Mikalson, Jon
D. Religion in ... The Greek World after Alexander 323-30 B.C. (London, 1999).

Ancient Greece

In this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. This edition has been updated with new suggested readings and illustrations.