The Gloster Meteor

The Gloster Meteor

Beskrivelse af Englands første jetjager, Gloster Meteor herunder flyets udviklingshistorie

The Gloster Meteor in British Service

The Gloster Meteor in British Service

The Gloster F.9/40 was Britains first jet fighter and as the Meteor F.I became the first jet-powered aircraft of any description to enter service with the Allies in World War II. Several early Meteors were dispatched to Europe in the hope that 1945 might witness the first ever jet-on-jet combats between it and the much-vaunted German jets a contest which, in the event, was never to occur.Postwar, and the Meteor quickly became the backbone of the UKs day fighter defenses, progressing through successive Marks as it did so, until finally being replaced on the front line by later types during the mid-1950s. With their ever-adaptable airframe, two-seat Meteors became Britains primary night fighter too, serving for several years until replaced by the Gloster Javelin from the late 1950s onwards.With its operational career over, the Meteors adaptability and ruggedness was put to sterling use as an advanced trainer, the most obvious example of which was the T.7. As late as 1982, a handful of stalwarts were still soldiering on.Although space precludes a comprehensive history of such a prolific aircraft, it is hoped that both aviation enthusiasts and aircraft modelers may find some interesting examples in these pages, and sufficient inspiration to help them choose which color scheme to finish their latest Meteor model in.This latest addition to the FlightCraft range follows our well-established format in that it is split into three primary sections. The first covers the Meteor using numerous photographs, informative captions and tables. The second is a 16-page full-color illustration section featuring detailed profiles and 2-views of many of the color schemes and markings carried by British Meteors. The final section lists as many injection-moulded plastic model kits of the Meteor, in all the major scales, that the authors could obtain, plus a gallery of models made by some of the UKs best modelers.

The Gloster Meteor F.I & F.III

The Gloster Meteor F.I & F.III

The Spitfire XVI is one of the Spitfire mark to have been so far little covered in depth. It was actually a Mk. IX engined with an American built Packard engine but otherwise it was very familar to a IX. Used in the fighter-bomber role, from the UK with the Fighter Command or from the Continent with the 2 TAF, one of the main task given to the XVI would be the destruction of the V-2 sites located in Holland. This book gives the details of the operations carried out by the British squadrons, Nos. 66, 74, 127, 229, 602 and 603. This study doesn't continue beyond the summer 1945. Thirty photos and 5 colour profiles.

Gloster Meteor

Gloster Meteor

The only RAF jet to see service in World War II, the Gloster Meteor remained in service for several years as an interceptor, ground attack airplane, night fighter, and trainer. The Meteor's simple construction also made it an ideal test plane for engines, ejector seats, and other developing technologies. This comprehensive history follows the long-serving Meteor from World War II to the present, providing both period photographs and modern shots of Meteors that are still operative.

Gloster Meteor

Britain's Celebrated First-generation Jet

Gloster Meteor

This is the first ever in-depth history of one of the most successful British aircraft of all time, the British Gloster Meteor, whose strong popularity is evidenced by the recent release of several brand new model kits of the type. This book thoroughly covers the craft's design, development, and initial flight testing. The book contains a great deal of previously unpublished information and numerous greatly detailed photos in both color and black & white.

Britain's Greatest Aircraft

Britain's Greatest Aircraft

During the last century the British aircraft industry created and produced many outstanding aeroplanes. These aircraft were world leaders in advanced technology, utilizing inventions by British engineers and scientists such as radar, the jet engine, the ejector seat and vertical take-off and landing. This book describes the design-history, development and operational careers of twenty-two legendary military and civil aeroplanes. Each one has played a significant part in aviation history. Sopwith Camel, SE.5, Bristol F2B Fighter and the Airco DH4 were all great successes in the relatively early days of flight. In the thirties the Bristol Bulldog fighter was an outstanding export success and the Short 'C' Class flying boat, later to become the Sunderland of World War II fame, pioneered the long-distance routes to the Empire. The pugnacious foreign policy of Hitler's Reich rung sudden alarm bells, rapid advances in fighting aircraft for the RAF became a premium objective. The brilliant Geodic construction of the Vickers Wellington bomber helped it survive terrible punishment throughout World War II, both the Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire saved England from invasion and the Bristol Beaufighter, de Havilland Mosquito and Avro Lancaster took the war to enemy soil. The Gloster Meteor became the word's first operational jet fighter and the English Electric Canberra became the RAF's first jet bomber and was manufactured under licence in the USA as the Martin B-57. In post-war years the Vickers Viscount became the world's first turboprop airliner and eventually became Britain's best selling commercial aircraft, whilst the de Havilland Comet became the world's first jet airliner. Despite Britain's recessionary years in the 50s and early 60s, military success came with the beautiful Hawker Hunter, the super-sonic Fairey Delta experimental aircraft that broke the World Air Speed Record and the Vickers Valiant that pioneered the operational techniques to deliver Britain's nuclear deterrent. Later, there followed the Mach 2 English Electric Lightning and the ill-fated TSR-2, the cancellation of which is still regarded as one of the greatest mistakes ever made in British aviation history. Finally, the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter that is still in service and now only being built in the USA. Finally the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter, still in service and now being further developed in the USA.

Gloster Meteor

Gloster Meteor

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet. It was an effective jet fighter that served the RAF for decades. This text presents a full chronology and photo history of development and operational use.

Inside History of the Usaf Lightweight Fighters, 1900 to 1975

Inside History of the Usaf Lightweight Fighters, 1900 to 1975

This book, in two volumes, attempts to explain the technology developments that evolved in the period from 1900 at Kitty Hawk through the ensuing seventy-five years leading to the development of the United States F-16 Multinational Weapon System in the mid-1970s. By 2017, 4,550 F-16s, all with the first all-electric, fly-by-wire flight control system have been manufactured for use by twenty-six countries. Awestricken birds undoubtedly ask themselves, How do humans do that? as an F-16 streaks by at over two hundred times the airspeed of the bird. This book strives to provide the how-and-why answer to that fascinating story.

Britain's Jet Age

From the Meteor to the Sea Vixen

Britain's Jet Age

A wonderful illustrated beginner's guide to the first generation of British Jet Aircraft.

Secret Weapons

Death Rays, Doodlebugs and Churchill’s Golden Goose

Secret Weapons

Deep in the bunkers of Nazi Germany, many of the world's top scientists worked to create a new generation of war winning super-weapons. A few of these, such as jet aircraft and the V2 rocket, became realities at the end of the war, others never made it off the drawing-board. Written by noted research scientist, Brian Ford, this exciting book charts the history of secret weapons development by all the major powers during the war, from British radar to Japanese ray-guns, and explains the impact that these developments eventually had on the outcome of World War II. Ford also takes a look at the weapons that never made it to development stage, as well as the more radical plans, such as the idea of turning Hitler into a woman with hormone treatment.