The Female Lead

Women Who Shape Our World

The Female Lead

Sixty inspirational women, from many walks of life. All have changed the world in a variety of fields. Among them are politicians and artists, journalists and teachers, engineers and campaigners, fire fighters and film stars. Together they form an arresting gallery of portraits, each one illustrated with original photography by Brigitte Lacombe. Some have led their professions; some have broken new ground for women; some have inspired changes through relentless endeavour. All were chosen for their ambitions and achievements and all tell their stories in their own words. For girls, it can be hard to identify role models in our society. This book will help and inspire women everywhere to realize their hopes and ambitions.

Last Age: Space in Hand

Last Age: Space in Hand

Country M's top secret service agent, Guo Lin, was framed by her companions during a mission and killed along with her. She was dressed as a match in a book.Guo Lin only wanted to take back everything she had and live on in peace. However, the frontline traverses through the woman sharpens the knife to seize the opportunity, the reborn woman calculates the full pre-revenge. Thus, Guo Lin followed him onto the same path as the female lead.Who said that to become a female lead, one had to sacrifice countless numbers of female partners. If a man did not destroy himself, then Guo Lin did not have such a feeling of devotion.

Divorce Attemps

Volume 5

Divorce Attemps

When Qin Yue loved him so much that he lost his dignity, Mo Lingcheng never even looked at her! When she saw through everything and decided to live for herself, Mo Lingcheng suddenly became entangled with her ... "Isn't the rose blood on the tip of your heart Zhou Yutong?! I just want to divorce you! Divorce! " Mo Lingcheng shamelessly kept pestering him, "I only have your shadow in my heart, how can I let go of another person in so many places? Stop messing around, don't let your son watch the show. "

Pick up A Handsome Boy For Festival

Volume 1

Pick up A Handsome Boy For Festival

On the day of registration, Lin Mo was furious after being ditched by his boyfriend. He swore to break off all ties with the man who played him, and perhaps the heavens were behind her, after being reneged on by the scum of a man, she met a handsome military brother at the entrance of the Civil Affairs Bureau. Lin Mo laughed out loud, hahaha! There is one as old as I am. But, Big Brother Jun, your wife doesn't want you anymore. There was no worst off, only worse off. At the new husband's friend banquet, who was going to be the one to break the engagement with? What? The scum man was Cang Qing's eldest nephew! A mouthful of blood gushed out from Lin Mu's mouth, but he still could not spit it out. "Leave everything to me." Cang Qing pulled Lin Mo into his embrace and swore the oath he made for his entire life. With just four words, he moved Second Young Master Lin to tears. He was willing to follow Cang Qing home and give birth to a bun for him ...

The Phantom Heroine

Ghosts and Gender in Seventheenth-century Chinese Literature

The Phantom Heroine

Zeitlin's study centers on the seventeenth century, one of the most interesting and creative periods of Chinese literature and politically one of the most traumatic, witnessing the overthrow of the Ming, the Manchu conquest, and the subsequent founding of the Qing. Drawing on fiction, drama, poetry, medical cases, and visual culture, the author departs from more traditional literary studies, which tend to focus on a single genre or author. Ranging widely across disciplines, she integrates detailed analyses of great literary works with insights drawn from the history of medicine, art history, comparative literature, anthropology, religion, and performance studies. The Phantom Heroine probes the complex literary and cultural roots of the Chinese ghost tradition. Zeitlin is the first to address its most remarkable feature: the phenomenon of verse attributed to phantom writers - that is, authors actually reputed to be spirits of the deceased. This book should appeal to readers interested in Chinese studies, gender studies, comparative literature, performance studies, the history of religion, and of course, ghost stories and the occult

Unfinished Business

Screening the Italian Mafia in the New Millennium

Unfinished Business

Unfinished Business is the first book to examine Italian mafia cinema of the past decade. It provides insightful analyses of popular films that sensationalize violence, scapegoat women, or repress the homosexuality of male protagonists. Dana Renga examines these works through the lens of gender and trauma theory to show how the films engage with the process of mourning and healing mafia-related trauma in Italy. Unfinished Business argues that trauma that has yet to be worked through on the national level is displaced onto the characters in the films under consideration. In a mafia context, female characters are sacrificed and non-normative sexual identities are suppressed in order to solidify traditional modes of viewer identification and to assure narrative closure, all so that the image of the nation is left unblemished.

Huju

Traditional Opera in Modern Shanghai

Huju

China has over three hundred distinct styles of music drama, from exorcism theatre to farce, historical romance, and shadow puppetry. This study considers one of the newer operatic forms. Established just two centuries ago, huju (Shanghai opera), is renowned for its portrayal of ordinary people, not the emperors, courtesans, and heroes of older forms. Acting and make-up aim for realism rather than symbolism, and stories deal with contemporaneous themes: the struggles of lovers to marry, women's rights after the Communist revolution (1949), and life under the new social order established by Deng Xiaoping's reforms in the 1980s. Music ranges from local folksong to syncretic adoptions of Western popular music. Jonathan Stock is an authority on Chinese music, with previous books on Chinese flute and violin solos and Abing, a twentieth-century composer. Adding to his extensive research on Chinese music, Stock's eighteen months of fieldwork in Shanghai allows him to interweave material from historical reports, sound recordings, live performance, and the first-hand accounts of three generations of singers into a study of a unique Chinese opera form seen equally as historical tradition, venue for social action, and forum for musical creativity. Assessing first the roots of huju in local folksong and ballad, he looks at the enduring role of emotional expressivity. He next focuses on the rise of actresses, laying out a specially 'musical' reading of gendered performance. Further chapters reverse conventional ethnomusicological arguments that music constructs place by looking at how Shanghai's institutions before 1949 shaped the environment within which troupes developed new dramatic materials and competed for work. In considering reforms post-1949, the author shows how the infusion of explicit political content actually weakened the expressive impact of these dramas. Finally, developments since 1980 are reviewed. The book includes songs and illustrations of performance styles. An innovative combination of urban and historical ethnomusicology, the book's findings will engage the historian of China and general scholar of music alike.

The Role of Female Seminaries on the Road to Social Justice for Women

The Role of Female Seminaries on the Road to Social Justice for Women

In the United States, female seminaries and their antecedents, the female academies, were crucial first institutions that played a vital role in liberating women from the "home sphere," a locus that was the primary domain of Euro-American women. The female seminaries founded by Native Americans and African Americans had different founding rationales but also played a key role in empowering women. On the whole, the initial intent of these schools was to prepare women for their proper role in American society as wives and mothers. An unintended effect, however, was to prepare women for the first socially accepted profession for women: teaching. Thus equipped, women played a crucial role in the development of American education at all levels while achieving varying degrees of social justice for themselves and other groups through engagement in the reform movements of their times--including women's suffrage, abolition, temperance, and mental health reform. By recapturing the role religion played in shaping education for women, Welch and Ruelas offer a refreshing take on history that draws on several primary texts and details more than one hundred female seminaries and academies opened in the United States.

Performance and Cultural Politics

Performance and Cultural Politics

Performance and Cultural Politics is a groundbreaking collection of essays which explore the historical and cultural territories of performance, written by the foremost scholars in the field. The essays, exploring performance art, theatre, music and dance, range from Oscar Wilde to Eric Clapton; from the Rose Theatre to U.S. Holocaust museums. The topic includes: * Sex Play: Stereotype, Pose and Dildo * Grave Performances: The Cultural Politics of Memory * Genealogies: Critical Performances * Identity Politics: Passing, Carnival and the Law In the concluding section, `Performer's Performance', performance artist Robbie McCauley offers the practitioner's perspective on performance studies. Interdisciplinary, thought-provoking and rich in new ideas, Performance and Cultural Politics is a landmark in the emerging field of performance studies.

The Song of Everlasting Sorrow

A Novel of Shanghai

The Song of Everlasting Sorrow

Set in post-World War II Shanghai, The Song of Everlasting Sorrow follows the adventures of Wang Qiyao, a girl born of the longtong, the crowded, labyrinthine alleys of Shanghai's working-class neighborhoods. Infatuated with the glitz and glamour of 1940s Hollywood, Wang Qiyao seeks fame in the Miss Shanghai beauty pageant, and this fleeting moment of stardom becomes the pinnacle of her life. During the next four decades, Wang Qiyao indulges in the decadent pleasures of pre-liberation Shanghai, secretly playing mahjong during the antirightist Movement and exchanging lovers on the eve of the Cultural Revolution. Surviving the vicissitudes of modern Chinese history, Wang Qiyao emerges in the 1980s as a purveyor of "old Shanghai"—a living incarnation of a new, commodified nostalgia that prizes splendor and sophistication—only to become embroiled in a tragedy that echoes the pulpy Hollywood noirs of her youth. From the violent persecution of communism to the liberalism and openness of the age of reform, this sorrowful tale of old China versus new, of perseverance in the face of adversity, is a timeless rendering of our never-ending quest for transformation and beauty.