The Estate House Re-designed

The Estate House Re-designed

The book demonstrates how new houses can be designed to be more sustainable and ergonomic. Specifically, it describes a prototype building that could be constructed in the near future. Responding to some of the poor standards of mass estate housing in the UK and its out-of-date space standards, it contributes towards improving the current status quo by describing a house design, including drawings, that can compete with today’s mass housing. The author examines the traditional geometrical reliance on the square in the design of houses and the planning of housing estates and promotes instead the adoption of polygonal forms. This is explained using geometric analysis, diagrams and references to existing housing. These concepts have been developed with reference to technical literature from various companies with one company interested in taking it further. Providing a novel and up-to-date design concept, this book is of value to practitioners and researchers looking to improve the standard of mass housing in the UK. It is also of interest to anyone wishing to build their own house and to manufacturers wanting to move into modern housing technology.

The Rogue's Yarn

The Rogue's Yarn

The book follows Orem's passage from boy-sailor in the sail training vessel Worchester just after the turn of the century to corridors of Admiralty by the end of the World War II. It tells of his transition from the Merchant to the Royal Navy just before the Great War, of his early experience in submarines under the tutelage of some of the pioneers of his revolutionary technology, and of his eventual appointment to Captain (S) 5th. Flotilla at HMSS Dolphin, the submarine training school at Fort Blockhouse.

Re-forming Britain

Narratives of Modernity before Reconstruction

Re-forming Britain

Re-forming Britain considers the nature and practice of architectural modernism in inter-war Britain in a new light. Bringing hitherto little considered protagonists and projects to the fore, it argues that rather than being an imported idiom, the new architecture in Britain formed part of an ongoing attempt to make a modern nation. Spanning the period 1925-42, the book focuses on the key sites from and through which architectural modernism emerged in the UK. Part one considers the main arena in which a will to modernize Britain developed in the 1920s. In parts two and three the author documents, contextualizes and explains how this modernizing will was given modernist form, discussing the work of architects such as Wells Coates, Maxwell Fry, and Connell and Ward, and their allied ventures with likeminded reformers in other fields. These collaborations produced ‘narratives of modernity’: buildings, projects, exhibitions and books, through which, the book argues, modernist reformers were able to persuade politicians, and those with influence upon them, that modernism was the means to re-form the nation. Re-forming Britain offers the first in-depth analysis of well-known modernist schemes such as Kensal House and the Pioneer Health Centre but also brings previously little studied or unknown activities to light. This important work invites a new understanding of the nature of architectural modernism in inter-war Britain and the ways in which it ultimately gave form to post-war Britain.

Landscapes and Gardens for Historic Buildings

A Handbook for Reproducing and Creating Authentic Landscapes

Landscapes and Gardens for Historic Buildings

It’s been more than forty years since the second edition of this landmark guide to the preservation and restoration of gardens and landscapes at historic sites was published. Since the last edition came out, author Rudy Favretti, the nation’s foremost authority in this area, has worked on many significant sites including both Monticello and Mount Vernon. New to this edition are: Personal case studies from the authors’ extensive experience in landscape restoration-preservation An in-depth look complete with color images of the archaeological excavations at Bacon’s Castle and Monticello in Virginia Seventy-three illustrations including eight color photos An enlarged and comprehensive bibliography Fully updated and added chapters based on new and emerging information in the field Further, Landscape and Gardens for Historic Buildings covers a wide array of topics including researching and planning, maintaining restored landscapes, identifying authentic flora, and selecting the right historical period, or a series of periods to show the evolution of the historic landscape.

St. James

St. James

St. James sits among a variety of old and intensely interesting communities that dot the north shore of Long Island, many of which date to the mid-1600s. After being named in the mid-1800s, it quickly became one of the hot spots that stars of the American vaudeville stage made their own. Built beside the homes of farmers and millers were hotels, a casino, and the mansions of the rich and famous, giving the community a fascination all its own--a fascination that is clearly captured in the pages of St. James.

Architectures of Russian Identity, 1500 to the Present

Architectures of Russian Identity, 1500 to the Present

From the royal pew of Ivan the Terrible, to Catherine the Great's use of landscape, to the struggles between the Orthodox Church and preservationists in post-Soviet Yaroslavl—across five centuries of Russian history, Russian leaders have used architecture to project unity, identity, and power. Church architecture has inspired national cohesion and justified political control while representing the claims of religion in brick, wood, and stone. The architectural vocabulary of the Soviet state celebrated industrialization, mechanization, and communal life. Buildings and landscapes have expressed utopian urges as well as lofty spiritual goals. Country houses and memorials have encoded their own messages. In Architectures of Russian Identity, James Cracraft and Daniel Rowland gather a group of authors from a wide variety of backgrounds—including history and architectural history, linguistics, literary studies, geography, and political science—to survey the political and symbolic meanings of many different kinds of structures. Fourteen heavily illustrated chapters demonstrate the remarkable fertility of the theme of architecture, broadly defined, for a range of fields dealing with Russia and its surrounding territories. The authors engage key terms in contemporary historiography—identity, nationality, visual culture—and assess the applications of each in Russian contexts.

New Society

New Society