The Dog Who Came to Stay

A Memoir

The Dog Who Came to Stay

The national bestselling memoir of a friendship between a New England outdoorsman and the scrawny foxhound who came to his door one snowy day. In the midst of a blizzard, late one Christmas night in the 1950s, author Hal Borland heard a howl at the back door of his home on a hundred-acre farm in the Housatonic Valley of northwest Connecticut. Resistant at first, he called around trying to find an owner whose dog had gone missing—with no luck. Finally, with the encouragement of his wife and haunted by memories of his childhood collie, Borland brought some scraps of leftover steak outside. This was his introduction to Pat, a miserable, half-starved, but deeply trusting black-and-white foxhound mutt. Pat would soon become a member of the family, accompanying Borland on hunts and terrorizing the local woodchuck population—and teaching him that sometimes our most immediate connection to the natural world is through the animals we live with. A longtime journalist and a winner of the John Burroughs Medal for distinguished nature writing, Borland tells the tale of the time he shared with Pat in this touching true story that “will appeal to many sportsmen and to all people who have ever been closely attached to a dog” (The New York Times Book Review).

Penny

The Story of a Free-Soul Basset Hound

Penny

“Some dogs, like some people, just can’t abide a quiet life,” writes the author of the national bestseller, The Dog Who Came to Stay, in this warm and touching memoir. Penny the basset shows up at the Borlands’ Connecticut farmhouse on a cold, snowy day—head held high, tail wagging, as if she were a long-awaited guest. Hal and Barbara Borland were no strangers to strays. Pat, the rabbit hound thousands of readers came to know in The Dog Who Came to Stay, had also appeared one winter, staying to become the family’s dear companion. Now, Pat is gone, and Hal and Barbara are bereft without canine company. They fall in love with Penny—and she seems to fit right in. Penny is a delightful dog—short-legged, flop-eared, full of fun and curiosity. And she loves people, so much so that she leaves the Borlands to go visiting elsewhere, often settling in with a different family for days on end. Indeed, Hal and Barbara admire her for her spirit of individuality and independence. Though she never truly belonged to them, the Borlands agreed that Penny was a dog well worth loving—and so will readers.

Beyond Your Doorstep

A Handbook to the Country

Beyond Your Doorstep

The inspiring classic on the virtues of embracing the great outdoors from the national bestselling author of The Dog Who Came to Stay. Over the course of his career, Hal Borland wrote eight nature books and hundreds of “outdoor editorials” for the Sunday New York Times, extolling the virtues of the countryside. From his home on one hundred acres in rural Connecticut, Borland wrote of the natural wonders, both big and small, that surrounded him every day. Beyond Your Doorstep is his guide to venturing into the outdoors around your home, wherever it is, and discovering the countryside within reach. The beauty to be found in roadsides, meadows, woodlands, and bogs are explored in elegant prose. Borland takes up birds, animals, and plants—both edible and poisonous—and the miraculous ways in which they are threaded together throughout the natural world. Part introductory field guide and part incitement to exploration, Beyond Your Doorstep is a classic of nature writing and a must-read for anyone looking to renew his or her relationship to the outdoors.

Country Editor's Boy

A Memoir

Country Editor's Boy

A memoir of youthful years spent in Colorado as the American West was transformed, by the author of High, Wide, and Lonesome and The Dog Who Came to Stay. Country Editor’s Boy picks up where Hal Borland’s classic memoir High, Wide and Lonesome left off: with Borland, on the cusp of adulthood in the early twentieth century, making his way in an eastern Colorado town that still retained all the flavors of the Old West. Borland’s father, the editor of a local weekly newspaper, was working to help his publication transition along with the town around him. At the same time, young Hal was experiencing dramatic social and economic change in his own way. In a matter of a decade, Borland’s Colorado town shifted from a frontier outpost to part of a rapidly urbanizing new America. This memoir shows a boy entering adulthood as the world around him comes of age. Evocative and wholly engrossing, Country Editor’s Boy is a vividly drawn portrait of western life, by one of the greatest naturalist writers of his age.

This Hill, This Valley

A Memoir

This Hill, This Valley

A memoir of a year immersed in nature on a New England farm, by the national bestselling author of The Dog Who Came to Stay. After a nearly fatal bout of appendicitis, Hal Borland decided to leave the city behind and move with his wife to a farmhouse in rural Connecticut. Their new home on one hundred acres inspired Borland to return to nature. In this masterpiece of American nature writing, he describes such wonders as the peace of a sky full of stars, the breathless beauty of blossoming plants, the way rain swishes as it hits a river, and the invigorating renewal brought by the changing seasons. The delights of nature as Borland observes them seem boundless, and his sense of awe is contagious.

When the Legends Die

The Timeless Coming-of-Age Story about a Native American Boy Caught Between Two Worlds

When the Legends Die

A young Native American raised in the forest is suddenly thrust into the modern world, in this novel by the author of The Dog Who Came to Stay. Thomas Black Bull’s parents forsook the life of a modern reservation and took to ancient paths in the woods, teaching their young son the stories and customs of his ancestors. But Tom’s life changes forever when he loses his father in a tragic accident and his mother dies shortly afterward. When Tom is discovered alone in the forest with only a bear cub as a companion, life becomes difficult. Soon, well-meaning teachers endeavor to reform him, a rodeo attempts to turn him into an act, and nearly everyone he meets tries to take control of his life. Powerful and timeless, When the Legends Die is a captivating story of one boy learning to live in harmony with both civilization and wilderness.

Memoirs of a Scheduler Aka Junk Yard Dog

Memoirs of a Scheduler Aka Junk Yard Dog

This book is to my knowledge accurate although as we all know some things get embellished with repeated telling. The company names are not real, as well as many of the names of individuals. Those who are in it can probably easily fi gure out who they are in this book. The story starts with Telecommunications back in the analog and live operators plugging in cords for local calls; then moves briefl y through Purchasing and Data Processing with the fi rst corporate main frame; and then to scheduling. It is more about me and my travels than it is about scheduling. The discipline took me to some very exotic places such as Tehran, Iran; Bergen Norway; Madrid Spain; Leyte Island; Jakarta, Dieng, Bali all in Indonesia; and Hawaii. It is also is a chronicle of some of my very good friends and lovers over the years. I hope all of you that read this enjoy it as much as I have in telling it.

This Land

A Novel Memoir

This Land

Out of the womens movement of the 1980s and 90s emerged small groups of women who purchased land together, usually in the country, sometimes in the wilderness. This Land, with its blend of fiction, memoir, poetry and essay, describes and reflects upon one such venture: eight women who bought 50 acres of Adirondack forestland in which they camped and built shelters, then more abiding homes. From diverse backgrounds they shared the American dream of a place for us, a place where they could find both sanctuary and adventure, solidarity and solitude, change and support. These survivors of 60s and 70s ferment and activism anticipated the challenges of group living, but coming from cities, they had no idea how much they would be changed by their encounters with the nature which surrounded them--its storms and vistas, animal visits, tree energies, and powers of water, fire, stars, lightning. For each of the eight women these meetings with natural others provided discoveries which helped them chart the whole of their lives, while guiding them toward paths of environmental guardianship. This is a story about how place shapes friendship and friendship informs place.