The Divine Embrace

Recovering the Passionate Spiritual Life

The Divine Embrace

This challenging work calls readers to an alternative Christian spirituality, one that reveals God's ''divine embrace'' of us and our passionate response.

The Divine Embrace

The Very Heart and Apex of Our Catholic Faith

The Divine Embrace

Father Frank Parrish, a renowned Jesuit priest, was engaged in giving radio and television talks nationwide through the "Heart of the Nation" and the "Catholic Quarter Hour". 50 popular talks are gathered in The Divine Embrace - The Very Heart and Apex of Our Catholic Faith.

Divine Embrace

Divine Embrace

Religion thrives on two lies: distance and delay. "Divine Embrace" celebrates the initiative that God undertook to cancel every possible definition of distance. The mission of Jesus was not to begin the Christian religion but to reveal and redeem the image and likeness of God in human form.

The Divine Heart of God the Father

The Divine Heart of God the Father

An intimate portrayal of God the Father and His Divine Heart is provided through brief narratives. Topics include how Our Father is in relationship with us, the inestimable beauty of His Majesty. His sweetness, softness, gentleness, and tenderness as Almighty Father. His profound thirst for union with us, deep sorrow at our distance, and urgent call for us to return to live in His Infinite Love. The process of union with God the Father, from the heart of our souls to the Core of His Divine Heart is described, from the context of the New Israel and intersecting relationships with the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Immaculate Heart of Mary, the Holy Spirit, and the Heart of the Holy Trinity. The tapestry of interplay between Our Father's Divine Heart, Will, and Infinite Love is explained. The upcoming Reign of the Father, in the Eucharistic Era of the Holy Spirit, is also introduced.

The Icon of the Divine Heart of God the Father: Apologia and Canon

The Icon of the Divine Heart of God the Father: Apologia and Canon

In this book, the background of the revealed, diptych, ecumenical icon of the Divine Heart of God the Father Encompassing All Hearts is presented, together with the related Consecration (Seal) Prayer to the Almighty Father. The icon apologia and canon are elucidated. The ecumenical importance of the icon of the Divine Heart for the universal Church is addressed, together with the basis for the icon in Sacred Scripture and Tradition, as well as its meaning for our present times and eschatological future. The aims of the icon, history of God the Father in iconography, and pertinent Church Council decrees are explored. The history of the first icon of the Eternal Father in the Catholic Church is given, with evidence of the Divine Paternal Heart, including Scriptural evidence, and the history/revelations of this second icon of the Father in the Catholic Church. A summary theology of the Divine Heart icon is outlined, with relevance to the sacred liturgy, Catholic/Orthodox mysticism, the era of the eighth day and deification of man, the universal call to holiness, and the de-Christianization of our times.

Common Roots

The Original Call to an Ancient-Future Faith

Common Roots

Common Roots turns the searchlight of historic Christianity on twenty-first-century evangelicalism. Originally published in 1978 as a clarion call to all evangelicals, this reprint presents Webber’s thoughts to a new generation and includes a foreword by David Neff, the executive director of the center that pays tribute to Webber’s work and supports the ancient-future faith movement.Webber’s primary concern is to uncover the roots of evangelical Christianity. In so doing, he looks critically at beliefs and practices of contemporary evangelicalism that are out of harmony with historic Christianity.Webber argues that examining the era of the early church (A.D. 100–500), and particularly the second century, offers insights that evangelicals need to recover for worship, theology, mission, and spirituality. Chapters highlight a problem, investigate the belief and practice of the early church, and suggest an agenda for evangelical Christianity.Common Roots is required reading for anyone interested in the ancient-future faith movement, the writings and thought of Robert Webber, or evangelicalism’s relationship to history.

Baptized in the Spirit

Baptized in the Spirit

Baptized in the Spirit creatively examines the most recent trends in Pentecostal and charismatic theology, especially with regard to the displacement of Spirit baptism as Pentecostalism’s central distinctive. The author begins by focusing on the significance of the Holy Spirit in reciprocal and mutual work with the Son in fulfilling the will of the Father. He also shows how the pneumatological emphases in Pentecostal and charismatic theology can help to correct the tendency in Western Christianity to subordinate the Spirit to the Word.

Journey Back to God

Origen on the Problem of Evil

Journey Back to God

Journey Back to God explores Origen of Alexandria's creative, complex, and controversial treatment of the problem of evil. It argues that his layered cosmology functions as a theodicy that deciphers deeper meaning beneath cosmic disparity. Origen asks: why does God create a world where some suffer more than others? On the surface, the unfair arrangement of the world defies theological coherence. In order to defend divine justice against the charge of cosmic mismanagement, Origen develops a theological cosmology that explains the ontological status and origin of evil as well as its cosmic implications. Origen's theodicy hinges on the journey of the soul back to God. Its themes correlate with the soul's creation, fall and descent into materiality, gradual purification, and eventual divinization. The world, for Origen, functions as a school and hospital for the soul where it undergoes the necessary education and purgation. Origen carefully calibrates his cosmology and theology. He portrays God as a compassionate and judicious teacher, physician, and father who employs suffering for our amelioration. Journey Back to God frames the systematic study of Origen's theodicy within a broader theory of theodicy as navigation, which signifies the dynamic process whereby we impute meaning to suffering. It unites the logical and spiritual facets of his theodicy, and situates it in its third-century historical, theological, and philosophical context, correcting the distortions that continue to plague Origen scholarship. Furthermore, the study clarifies his ambiguous position on universalism within the context of his eschatology. Finally, it assesses the cogency and contemporary relevance of Origen's theodicy, highlighting the problems and prospects of his bold, constructive, and optimistic vision.

Mysticism

A Study in the Nature and Development of Spiritual Consciousness

Mysticism

DIVClassic introduction to mysticism and mystical consciousness: awakening of the self, purification, voices and visions, ecstasy and rapture, dark night of the soul, much more. /div