The Dignity of Human Nature

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The Dignity of Human Nature


Human Dignity

Kateb asserts that the defense of universal human rights requires two indispensable components: morality (as promoted or enforced by justice) and human dignity.

Human Dignity

Kateb asserts that the defense of universal human rights requires two indispensable components: morality (as promoted or enforced by justice) and human dignity. For Kateb, morality and justice have sound theoretical underpinnings; human dignity, by virtue of its “existential” quality, lacks (but merits) its own theoretical framework. This he proceeds to establish with a critique of the writings of canonical Western political philosophers (Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseu, Mill, Emerson, Thoreau) and contemporary thinkers like Peter Singer and Thomas Nagel. The author argues that while morality compels just governments to prevent, reduce, or eliminate human suffering inasmuch as it is possible, people possess and are entitled to dignity by mere virtue of their “status” as human beings. Homo sapiens, he maintains, have a “stature,” manifest in the species's “great achievements,” that exceeds that of other creatures, even in (or especially in) the secular cosmos.

Love and the Dignity of Human Life

Renowned German philosopher Robert Spaemann addresses these and other foundational enigmas in three eloquent short essays.

Love and the Dignity of Human Life

What does it mean to love someone? What does the concept of human dignity mean, and what are its consequences? What marks the end of a person's life? Is personhood more than consciousness? These perplexing questions lurk beneath the surface of everyday life, surfacing only to demand urgent attention in crises. Renowned German philosopher Robert Spaemann addresses these and other foundational enigmas in three eloquent short essays. Speaking wisdom to controversy, he offers carefully considered, novel approaches to key philosophical and theological questions about the nature of human love ("The Paradoxes of Love"), dignity ("Human Dignity and Human Nature"), and death ("Is Brain Death the Death of a Human Person?").

Dignity in Care for Older People

Human dignity, sometimes referred to by the German term Menschenwürde,
refers to a kind of dignity that we all have as humans, or are ... first article of the
Universal Declaration ofHuman Rights (1948) states: 'All human beings are born
free, equal in dignity and human rights. ... Pico della Mirandola in the 16th
century described how God the Father gave humans an indeterminate nature (
1948, p. 227).

Dignity in Care for Older People

The notion of quality of life has for several decades beenwell-established in ethical debate about health care and the careof older people. Dignity in Care for Older Peoplehighlights the notion of dignity within the care of the elderly,focusing on the importance of theoretical concepts. Primarily based on a Research Project, Dignity and Older Europeans,funded by the European Commission, this book provides a thoroughinvestigation of the concept of dignity and related concepts suchas quality of life and autonomy. It includes a chapter devoted tothe dignity of human embodiment, emphasizing the importance of thenotion of the lived body in the context of elderly care. As aresult of the conceptual study a model of dignity emerges in whichfour variants of dignity stand out: dignity of merit, dignity asmoral status, dignity of identity and Menschenwürde (thespecifically human value). From this follows a discussion of howthese variants of dignity can be used in characterizing the care ofthe elderly. The notions of dignity and dignified care arediscussed particularly in relation to demented persons and dyingpersons. The book also contains a chapter on the dignity of thedead person. International in focus, Dignity in Care for Older Peopleprovides a contemporary discussion of the care of older people, andwill be of use to qualified nurses and social care practitionersworking with older people, as well as those on ethics andgerontology courses.