The Different Drum

Community-making and peace

The Different Drum

`The overall purpose of human communication is - or should be - reconciliation. It should ultimately serve to lower or remove the walls of misunderstanding which unduly separate us human beings, one from another. . ' Although we have developed the technology to make communication more efficent and to bring people closer together, we have failed to use it to build a true global community. Dr M. Scott Peck believes that if we are to prevent civilization destroying itself, we must urgently rebuild on all levels, local, national and international and that is the first step to spiritual survival. In this radical and challenging book he describes how the communities work, how group action can be developed on the principles of tolerance and love, and how we can start to transform world society into a true community.

The Different Drum

Community-making and Peace

The Different Drum

`The overall purpose of human communication is - or should be -reconciliation. It should ultimately serve to lower or remove the walls of misunderstanding which unduly separate us human beings, one from another. . ' Although we have developed the technology to make communication more efficent and to bring people closer together, we have failed to use it to build a true global community. Dr M. Scott Peck believes that if we are to prevent civilization destroying itself, we must urgently rebuild on all levels, local, national and international and that is the first step to spiritual survival. In this radical and challenging book he describes how the communities work, how group action can be developed on the principles of tolerance and love, and how we can start to transform world society into a true community.

A Different Drum

A Different Drum

Out-of-work reporter Mallory Aikins dreams of a Prince Charming who will whisk her away from her family's poverty to his mansion on the hill. Instead, she's stranded in the tiny town of Sagebrush, watching her chance at a new start in Palm Springs evaporate in the New Mexico heat. But her reporter's curiosity is piqued by sexy, mysterious, motorcycle-riding sheriff Drummond Wolfe. Mallory is determined to find out his secret, even if it threatens the passion that's beginning to sizzle between them. Heir to a Gulf Coast oil fortune, Drum wants nothing to do with his wealthy family or the annoying, infuriating, and captivating woman he rescued from the side of the road. He likes his quiet and peaceful life, but Mallory could turn his world upside down. In the process of running away from who they are, they're destined to run right into each other.

A Different Drum

A Different Drum

Shenandoah Shen Jones, on temporary suspension from the Phoenix Police Department, is asked by his boss to investigate the possible stalking of a family friend, a local television reporter. When the reporter is found dead, Jones is plunged into the dark world of sexual depravity, a journey that nearly costs him his life.

Beat of a Different Drum

The Untold Stories of African Americans Forging Their Own Paths in Work and Life

Beat of a Different Drum

"Beat of a Different Drum is a serious feat of journalism, yet it exhibits an honesty of narration that journalism usually lacks. It tackles some heady issues, from the purpose of our existence to the meaning of race in a less-stereotyped world. Dax Devlon-Ross is a strong new voice, and one we will be hearing often." -- Po Bronson, author of WHAT WILL I DO WITH MY LIFE? "Dax-Devlon Ross's clear-eyed subjects present themselves as unique Americans, men and women of variety and depth, cognizant of their place in society, yet varied in their opinions, hues, and occupations. They are wondrously amazed by the joy and pains of their self created lives. I'm glad Dax-Devlon Ross allowed me to meet them." -- James McBride, author of The Color of Water and Miracle at St. Anna In a series of insightful, probing interviews, Dax-Devlon Ross gives voice to the less-acknowledged realms of the black experience and gives us all new role models of courage, iconoclasm, and creativity. Ross, an inner-city schoolteacher who eschewed a career in law, became aware of the need for a book like this one when he came to his own career crossroads. To write it, he crisscrossed the country and even traveled to Europe, talking to black Americans who have stepped outside their comfort zones and found lives that no one had ever imagined theyd lead. In BEAT OF A DIFFERENT DRUM, youll meet: Lisa Stevens, the zoo curator who cares for the pandas at the National Zoo Johnathon Lee Iverson, the first black Ringling Brothers Circus ringleader Jair Lynch, an Olympic athlete and real estate entrepreneur James McLurkin, an inventor and robotics researcher Ray Hill, a brewmeister who left a lucrative career to start his own beer company Uchenna Smith, who, at 25, began running her own school with the KIPP-Sankofa program Jake Lamar, an expatriate novelist Mike Ladd, an M.C., producer, and professor Bill Collins, a former Principal turned sailor turned world-renowned chef Stacey Barney, a schoolteacher turned book editor . . . as well as many others, each of whose stories has something unique to teach us about the search for meaning in one's lifework, and the challenges that we must still face when we march to the beat of a different drum.

A Different Drum

The Image of the Negro in the Nineteenth Century Popular Song Books

A Different Drum


The Beat of a Different Drum

The Life and Science of Richard Feynman

The Beat of a Different Drum

Few would argue that Richard Feynman was one of the greatest American-born theoretical physicists of the twentieth century, and fewer still would dispute that he was the most iconoclastic. In the words of the eminent mathematician Mark Kac, geniuses are of two kinds: the ordinary, and the magicians. Feynman was a magician of the highest caliber. No one could guess how his mind worked, how he could make transcendental leaps of the imagination so fearlessly. A true original, Feynman was both an inspired, Nobel-prize winning pioneer, and a born showman. He never lost sight of his vision of science as "a long history of learning how not to fool ourselves." The Beat of a Different Drum is a superb account of Feynman's life and work, encompassing a singular career that spanned from the detonation of the first atomic bomb at Los Alamos to the frontiers of our understanding of the universe. The first biography to offer deep insight into both Feynman's scientific achievements and his personal life, it is written by Jagdish Mehra. An accomplished physicist and historian of science in his own right, Mehra knew Feynman for thirty years, and their friendship deeply informs all aspects of the book. Feynman invited Mehra to spend three weeks with him shortly before his death in 1988, and after Feynman died, following a ten year battle against cancer, Mehra interviewed almost eighty of his friends and colleagues. They share their recollections of Feynman from his precocious childhood in Queens, New York, to his final days, painting an unforgettable portrait of a scientist who insisted throughout his life on taking the whole of nature as the arena of his science and his imagination. Mehra writes clearly and comprehensively about the theoretical and technical aspects of Feynman's achievements: his crucial role in the development of the atomic bomb; his association with Hans Bethe at Cornell, where he worked out his famous path-integral formulation of quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics, and went on to develop the Feynman diagrams, so ubiquitous in quantum field theory, elementary particle physics, and statistical mechanics; and the full range and depth of his work from 1950 until shortly before his death at the California Institute of Technology. Here, too, are intimate glimpses into the development of Feynman's inner life, including his devoted relationship with his extraordinary father, a self-taught uniform salesman, and his first marriage, to his boyhood sweetheart, Arline, whom he married knowing that she had only a short time to live. Feynman was an eyewitness to some of this century's key moments of scientific discovery, and Mehra devotes an entire chapter to Feynman's more philosophical reflections on the implications of these discoveries. Flamboyant and impatient, but dedicated to his vision of a better world through cooperation and the fearless pursuit of scientific truth, Feynman emerges here as a genius whom fellow Nobel laureate Julian Schwinger remembered as "an honest man; the outstanding intuitionist of our age and a prime example of what may lie in store for anyone who dares to follow the beat of a different drum."