The Diatessaron of Tatian

The Diatessaron of Tatian

This edition of the Diatessaron of Tatian presents a reader-friendly version of the most popular unified account of Jesus’s life and teachings, as written in the gospels, for over three centuries, and a crucial link to the early history of the church and Christian doctrine. The Diatessaron takes center stage in Ian Caldwell’s new breakout novel The Fifth Gospel. Composed in the 2nd century CE, the Diatessaron is Tatian’s combination of the texts of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John into one comprehensive timeline of Jesus’s life. Tatian the Assyrian, an obscure but highly controversial theologian who was expelled from the early Church, tried to fill in the gaps left by the traditional four gospels and resolve their contradictions. The Diatessaron was a major source for the story of the life of Christ until the 6th Century CE when it fell into obscurity and the four gospels took its place in the order of the New Testament. This original translation by Reverend Hope W. Hogg, B.D. preserves Tatian’s chronology and allows readers access to this little-known ancient text and a crucial link to the early Church and the life and death of Jesus.

Tatian's Diatessaron

Its Creation, Dissemination, Significance, and History in Scholarship

Tatian's Diatessaron

A comprehensive study of one of the earliest witnesses to the gospels ("c." 172): its composition, dissemination, description of the surviving witnesses and a history of scholarship; it offers criteria for reconstruction and their application in examples. Exhaustive Bibliography and Catalogue of Witnesses are provided.

The Gospel of Tatian

Exploring the Nature and Text of the Diatessaron

The Gospel of Tatian

This volume combines some of the leading voices on the composition and collection of early Christian gospels in order to analyze Tatian's Diatessaron. The rapid rise and sudden suppression of the Diatessaron has raised numerous questions about the nature and intent of this second-century composition. It has been claimed as both a vindication of the fourfold gospel's early canonical status and as an argument for the canon's on-going fluidity; it has been touted as both a premiere witness to the earliest recoverable gospel text and as an early corrupting influence on that text. Collectively, these essays provide the greatest advance in Diatessaronic scholarship in a quarter of a century. The contributors explore numerous questions: did Tatian intend to supplement or supplant the fourfold gospel? How many were his sources and how free was he with their text? How do we identify a Diatessaronic witness? Is it legitimate to use Tatian's Diatessaron as a source in New Testament textual criticism? Is a reconstruction of the Diatessaron still possible? These queries in turn contribute to the question of what the Diatessaron signifies with respect to the broader context of gospel writing, and what this can tell us about how the writing, rewriting and reception of gospel material functioned in the first and second centuries and beyond.

Saint Ephrem's Commentary on Tatian's Diatessaron

An English Translation of Chester Beatty Syriac MS 709

Saint Ephrem's Commentary on Tatian's Diatessaron

This is the first English translation of the commentary by fourth century A.D. theologian Ephrem the Syrian on the Diatessaron--a Gospel woven from the text of the four Gospels, which predates our earliest evidence of the official Syriac translation of the New Testament. The translation fills a gap in scholarship and will be appreciated by patristics and biblical scholars, hagiographers, and historians of Christianity.

The Diatessaron of Tatian: A Harmony of the Four Holy Gospels Compiled in the Third Quarter of the Second Century

The Diatessaron of Tatian: A Harmony of the Four Holy Gospels Compiled in the Third Quarter of the Second Century

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Earliest Life of Christ

The Diatessaron of Tatian

The Earliest Life of Christ

First published in 1910, this Diatessaron is the earliest recorded gospel of the life of Jesus before the canonical gospel took its place.

The Ante-Nicene Fathers

The Writings of the Fathers Down to A. D. 325, Volume IX Recently Discovered Additions to Early Christian Literature; Commenta

The Ante-Nicene Fathers

"One of the first great events in Christian history was the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD, convened to organize Christian sects and beliefs into a unified doctrine. The great Christian clergymen who wrote before this famous event are referred to as the Ante-Nicenes and the Apostolic Fathers, and their writings are collected here in a ten-volume set. The Ante-Nicenes lived so close to the time of Christ that their interpretations of the New Testament are considered more authentic than modern voices. But they are also real and flawed men, who are more like their fellow Christians than they are like the Apostles, making their words echo in the ears of spiritual seekers. In Volume IX of the 10-volume collected works of the Ante-Nicenes first published between 1885 and 1896, the series editors return to a collection that they had thought complete. Archaeological discoveries presented them with new early Christian texts that needed publication. This volume is divided into two parts: newly discovered fragments and writings from a variety of sources, and additional commentaries by Origen. These new fragments include: the Gospel of Peter and the Apocalypse of Peter the Diatessaron of Tatian and the Vision of Paul the Apocalypse of the Virgin and the Apocalypse of Sedrach The Testament of Abraham and the Acts of Xanthippe and Polyxena the Narrative of Zosimus and the Epistles of Clement the Apology of Aristides the Philosopher the Passion of the Scillitan Martyrs epistle to Gregory and Origen's commentary"

The Diatessaron: A Harmony of the Four Gospels

The Diatessaron: A Harmony of the Four Gospels

The Diatessaron is a chronological account of the four gospels of the Lord Jesus Christ, being the four gospels that are already known according to Saints Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Tatian of Adiabene was an early Christian leader and writer in the early Church, whom Eusebius refers to in his Ecclesiastical History. The Diatessaron was compiled in the second century A.D. by Tatian. Here you are invited to read it for yourself, and it is very rewarding and will increase your knowledge of God. It is well formatted with large print for ease of reading and wide margins. From knowledge comes faith.