The Dark Man

The Dark Man

In The Dark Man we look at the confusion and mystery surrounding this phenomenon. We consider, amongst other things, who or what the dark man may be, the environment in which he is found and the 'job' he performs. The dark man is not some abstract phantom or fairytale diabolus, he is a real, valid entity that is a part of all our lives - right now. He is the source of our most terrible nightmares or the way to our happily-ever-afters. The choice is yours.

The Dark Man

The Dark Man

Turlough O’Brien leaves on a quest to pursue Thorfel the Fair who has kidnapped Moira of the O’Brien clan! It seemed like a simple plan… rescue Moira and return home... but it takes him on an adventurous journey through perilous lands with mysterious people!

The Dark Man

Australia’s first serial killer

The Dark Man

The Dark Man is the amazing true story of one of Australia’s first serial killers, who kept the colony of New South Wales in the grip of fear as the police ruthlessly hunted their man. In late 1896, three men go missing in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. Each man has answered a newspaper advertisement posted by charismatic conman and notorious criminal, Frank Butler (one of his many aliases). Lured to the western goldfields by stories of the untold wealth that awaits them, the men find themselves at the mercy of the psychopathic Butler in some of Australia’s most isolated and inhospitable terrain. Motivated by the thrill of killing and by a sick pleasure in outwitting his trusting victims, Butler makes his prey dig their own graves before he shoots them in the back of the head, buries them, and steals their few meagre possessions. After an exhaustive search of the rugged mountains near Glenbrook, police discover the bodies of the victims. In a criminal investigation that would become legendary, police are led on an international manhunt as Butler uses a Master’s ticket from one of his victim to secure a berth on the steamer, the Swanhilda, headed for San Francisco. Following a dramatic arrest at gunpoint, Butler is returned to Sydney, found guilty, and hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol, having confessed to those three murders – and alluded to many more. This compelling account of a cold and calculating killer is told in a gripping historical narrative that brings Australia’s Gold Rush period vividly to life.

When the Dark Man Calls

When the Dark Man Calls

A radio therapist is haunted by her parents' killer. It is 1957, and Jean Kaiser is pretending to sleep. She strains her ears to hear her parents, waiting for them to go to bed so she can indulge in her great joy - listening to the far-off radio stations that play Paul Anka, Pat Boone, and Elvis. But instead of bedtime sounds, she hears her mother's voice calling her name so strangely that Jean thinks it must be a nightmare. When she awakes in the morning, the nightmare is real - a killer has slaughtered her parents. More than two decades later, Jean has done her best to move past her childhood trauma, parlaying a degree in psychology into a position as the host of a radio call-in show. One night, an anonymous caller reaches out to her, talking menacingly about unfinished business. When Jean and her daughter, Angie, get home, they find their pet parakeet crushed to death over Jean's bed. Her parents' killer has reemerged ready to tie up loose ends, meaning mortal danger not just for Jean, but for Angie, too. About the Author. Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934-2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema - two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life's work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood's Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as "the anti-Philip Marlowe." In 1981's Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009. Review quote. "Kaminsky stands out as a subtle historian, unobtrusively but entertainingly weaving into the story itself what people were wearing, eating, driving, and listening to on the radio. A page-turning romp." - Booklist. "For anyone with a taste for old Hollywood B-movie mysteries, Edgar winner Kaminsky offers plenty of nostalgic fun . . . The tone is light, the pace brisk, the tongue firmly in cheek." - Publishers Weekly. "Marvelously entertaining." - Newsday. "Makes the totally wacky possible . . . Peters [is] an unblemished delight." - Washington Post. "The Ed McBain of Mother Russia." - Kirkus Reviews.

The Dark Man

The Dark Man

SUPERANNO Stephen King first wrote about the Dark Man in college after he envisioned a faceless man in cowboy boots and jeans and a denim jacket forever walking the roads. Later this dark man would come to be known around the world as one of King's greatest villains, Randall Flagg, but at the time King only had simple questions on his mind: Where was this man going? What had he seen and done? What terrible things?

The Dark Man

(The Graveyard: Classified Horror Books #1)

The Dark Man

Ford Atticus Ford, former host of the hit ghost-hunting reality show Graveyard: Classified, has more than a few regrets—especially after young Chelsea Hopper was attacked by a demon...on live television. Assisting police departments by conducting paranormal investigations and uncovering buried clues now provides Ford with an ounce of redemption, but it will never be enough. What occurred on that long-ago Halloween night was unforgivable, and Ford, chasing ratings and stardom, let it happen. With Graveyard cancelled and his reputation destroyed, Ford sets out to avenge little Chelsea, and to save his own soul—if he can. ### Popular themes and keywords books about ghosts, ghost stories, paranormal thrillers, horror books, horror novels, scary stories, scary books, horror authors, scariest books, creepy books, paranormal investigators, ghost hunters, paranormal research, paranormal detectives, ghost hunting, ghost detectors, 2020, haunted houses, paranormal activity, hauntings, ghost adventures, free, freebie

The Dark Man: The Journal of Robert E. Howard Studies

The Dark Man: The Journal of Robert E. Howard Studies

The Dark Man: The Journal of Robert E. Howard Studies, Vol. 7, No. 2. Articles by Lee Breakiron (The Cromlechers, on the fanzine the Cromlech), and Jeffrey Shanks on theosophy in the works of Robert E. Howard. The journal ends with a book review by Mark Finn.

Reynold de Burgh: The Dark Knight

Reynold de Burgh: The Dark Knight

The "black sheep" of the de Burgh family is a title Reynold wears well. Outcast and injured, this knight is journeying alone. But his bitter pilgrimage is interrupted by a very determined damsel who holds him to his knight's vow—to protect and serve! Sabina Sexton knows her reluctant rescuer is skeptical about her quest. But the danger is very real, and wary Sabina must place her life—and her heart—in this dark and dangerously attractive knight's keeping….

The Dark Man

The Dark Man

"The Dark Man" is a short story by Robert Ervin Howard. Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 - June 11, 1936) was an American author who wrote pulp fiction in a diverse range of genres. He is well known for his character Conan the Barbarian and is regarded as the father of the sword and sorcery subgenre. Howard was born and raised in the state of Texas. He spent most of his life in the town of Cross Plains with some time spent in nearby Brownwood. A bookish and intellectual child, he was also a fan of boxing and spent some time in his late teens bodybuilding, eventually taking up amateur boxing. From the age of nine he dreamed of becoming a writer of adventure fiction but did not have real success until he was 23. Thereafter, until his death at the age of 30 by suicide, Howard's writings were published in a wide selection of magazines, journals, and newspapers, and he had become successful in several genres. Although a Conan novel was nearly published into a book in 1934, his stories never appeared in book form during his lifetime. The main outlet for his stories was in the pulp magazine Weird Tales. Howard's suicide and the circumstances surrounding it have led to varied speculation about his mental health. His mother had been ill with tuberculosis his entire life, and upon learning that she had entered a coma from which she was not expected to wake, he walked out to his car and shot himself in the head. In the pages of the Depression-era pulp magazine Weird Tales, Howard created Conan the Barbarian, a character whose cultural impact has been compared to such icons as Tarzan, Count Dracula, Sherlock Holmes, Batman, and James Bond. With Conan and his other heroes, Howard created the genre now known as sword and sorcery, spawning many imitators and giving him a large influence in the fantasy field. Howard remains a highly read author, with his best works still reprinted. Howard spent his late teens working odd jobs around Cross Plains; all of which he hated. In 1924, Howard returned to Brownwood to take a stenography course at Howard Payne College, this time boarding with his friend Lindsey Tyson instead of his mother. Howard would have preferred a literary course but was not allowed to take one for some reason. Biographer Mark Finn suggests that his father refused to pay for such a non-vocational education. In the week of Thanksgiving that year, and after years of rejection slips and near acceptances, he finally sold a short caveman tale titled "Spear and Fang," which netted him the sum of $16 and introduced him to the readers of a struggling pulp called Weird Tales. Now that his career in fiction had begun, Howard dropped out of Howard Payne College at the end of the semester and returned to Cross Plains. Shortly afterwards, he received notice that another story, "The Hyena," had been accepted by Weird Tales. During the same period, Howard made his first attempt to write a novel, a loosely autobiographical book modeled on Jack London's Martin Eden and titled Post Oaks & Sand Roughs. The book was otherwise of middling quality and was never published in the author's lifetime but it is of interest to Howard scholars for the personal information it contains. Howard's alter ego in this novel is Steve Costigan, a name he would use more than once in the future. The novel was finished in 1928 but not published until long after his death.

The Dark Knight

The Dark Knight

At long last, Elizabeth Elliott—the bestselling author of The Warlord and Scoundrel—returns with a medieval romance that will take readers’ breath away. Thief, assassin, and master of disguise, Dante Chiavari is the most feared mercenary of England’s King Edward. On one last assignment, Dante must play the part of a chivalrous knight to steal Avalene de Forshay from her family and thwart the ruthless Faulke Segrave, who would wed Avalene and use her to spark war between Wales and the crown. Upon seeing the beautiful and innocent young maiden, however, the mercenary suddenly finds himself at the mercy of his own intense desire. When Avalene meets the handsome knight she knows only as Sir Percival, he sweeps her off her feet even as he spirits her away from Coleway Castle. Their escape is wrought with risks and perils, but Avalene will find that the greatest danger lies in losing her heart. And after the truth is revealed, Avalene fears that she may never again be able to trust the dark knight who has come to mean more to her than life itself.