The Danish Girl

The Danish Girl

The Danish Girl is now a major motion picture starring Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander, directed by Tom Hooper. Loosely inspired by a true story, this tender portrait of marriage asks: What do you do when the person you love has to change? It starts with a question, a simple favour asked by a wife of her husband while both are painting in their studio, setting off a transformation neither can anticipate. Uniting fact and fiction into an original romantic vision, The Danish Girl eloquently portrays the unique intimacy that defines every marriage and the remarkable story of Lili Elbe, a pioneer in transgender history, and the woman torn between loyalty to her marriage and her own ambitions and desires. The Danish Girl is an evocative and deeply moving novel about one of the most passionate and unusual love stories of the 20th century.

Negotiating Identities

Essays on Immigration and Culture in Present-day Europe

Negotiating Identities

This book is about the new possibilities that emerge at the conjunction of the cultural trajectories of the present. Through different journeys in the European, and particularly the Scandinavian and the British present, the authors of this collection of essays discuss the interrelations of culture, race, gender, ethnicity and identity. They elucidate how identies are negotiated and cultures processed. The passages of culture addressed here open for a deeper understanding of the varieties of ethnicity and in particular of those of the borderlands with their potential for intercultural and transnational conversation.

Transgender Rights

Striving for Equality

Transgender Rights

In recent years, the public's awareness and understanding of the transgender community has grown drastically, from near total ignorance to a nuanced and complex approach to trans individuals and their rights. This collection of articles features reporting, opinion pieces, and first-person accounts that capture the evolving conversation about issues related to the trans community. With coverage of the Texas and North Carolina "bathroom bills," the debate over the inclusion of trans people in the military, and tales of various struggles and successes in the courts, this book highlights the obstacles this growing movement faces as well as its successes.

Language and Culture Pedagogy

From a National to a Transnational Paradigm

Language and Culture Pedagogy

Looks at the teaching of language and culture in a globalized world.

Language and Culture

Global Flows and Local Complexity

Language and Culture

The book presents a new theory of the relationship between language and culture in a transnational and global perspective. The fundamental view is that languages spread across cultures, and cultures spread across languages, or in other words, that linguistic and cultural practices flow through social networks in the world along partially different paths and across national structures and communities.

The Prison Dance

The Prison Dance

This memoir was inspired by the authors encounter with Palestinian women political prisoners of NeveTirza Beit Soar. It begins with the journey she took through North Africa in 1970 and ends in an Israeli jail. It describes a tumultuous era, the experiences of women travelling unescorted amidst men, and the daily life of an Israeli prison. The tales of The Prison Dance are poignant, sometimes tragic, but frequently humorous, owing to the often bizarre quality of events that transpired. As the author was a dancer, the reader experiences these events through the eyes of Dance. Powerful and affectingGreat subjectstill current in spite of the intervening yearsa valuable document of those times. Hank Schachte, author of Killing time

Losing the Garden

The Story of a Marriage

Losing the Garden

“Waterman’s mesmerizing account of her intense but unusual and tragic marriage to noted climber and wilderness advocate Guy Waterman.” —Stowe Today.com Laura and Guy Waterman spent nearly three decades homesteading in a cabin in the Vermont mountains. But the end of their marriage came on a frigid day, February 6, 2000, when Guy climbed to the summit of Mount Lafayette in New Hampshire’s White Mountains and sat down among the rocks to die. Losing the Garden is the memoir of a woman who was compelled to ask herself “How could I support my husband’s plan to commit suicide?” In her intimate examination, we explore their intricate and dark family histories and reach a deep understanding of the marriage that tried to transcend them. At its heart, this is a love story and an affirmation of life after loss. “In the enigmatic Losing the Garden: The Story of a Marriage, Waterman tells with astonishing frankness the wrenching story of her marriage and widowhood.” —Chicago Tribune “A compelling memoir demands a precarious dance between the universal and the unusual . . . The result is a very slow waltz during which the dancers hardly touch.” —The Boston Globe (Editor’s Pick) “This is a survivor’s tale of an unusual life and a loving marriage. Waterman’s well-written and heartfelt book will resonate with anyone whose life has been touched by the suicide of a loved one.” —Library Journal