The Courtroom Is My Theater

My Lifelong Representation of Famous Politicians, Industrialists, Entertainers, “Men of Honor,” and More

The Courtroom Is My Theater

Former President of the Criminal Bar Association Richard Levitt called Goldberg “one of the foremost litigators of this or any generation.” Former Chief of the Criminal Division of the United States Attorney's Office S.D.N.Y. Frederick Hafetz said: “I consider you to have the best killer trial skills I have ever seen in my 47 years of practice, and I have worked with the best, courtroom presence, capturing the jury's attention through devastating cross and summations that have jurors on the edge of their seats.” New York Supreme Court Justice Arthur Lonschein said: “[Jay Goldberg] holds the distinction of being one of the most skilled, if not the most skilled trial lawyer in the United States.” In The Courtroom Is My Theater, Jay Goldberg shows why he is one of the preeminent trial attorneys in America, as he shares stories of his high-profile courtroom drama as well as his adventures outside of the courtroom with some of the country’s most prominent politicians, businessmen, entertainers, and “men of honor.”

Understanding Cry, the Beloved Country

A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Understanding Cry, the Beloved Country

Essays and primary source documents dealing with African history and social conditions aid a critical analysis of the work.

The Combing of History

The Combing of History

How is historical knowledge produced? And how do silence and forgetting figure in the knowledge we call history? Taking us through time and across the globe, David William Cohen's exploration of these questions exposes the circumstantial nature of history. His investigation uncovers the conventions and paradigms that govern historical knowledge and historical texts and reveals the economic, social, and political forces at play in the production of history. Drawing from a wide range of examples, including African legal proceedings, German and American museum exhibits, Native American commemorations, public and academic debates, and scholarly research, David William Cohen explores the "walls and passageways" between academic and non-academic productions of history.

Conflict of Interest

Conflict of Interest

Trial lawyer Ted Stevens -- the untidy but lovable "Teddy Bear" -- fights his own battles, including his alcoholism and his pending divorce, as he fights for his client in a murder case. But it's the other suspect in the case who causes the conflict of interest.

Spent

Exposing Our Complicated Relationship with Shopping

Spent

In Spent, editor Kerry Cohen opens the closet doors wide to tales of women’s true relationships with shopping, from humorous stories of love/hate relationships with the mall to heartbreaking tales of overspending to fix relationships. With a contributor list that includes notable female writers like Emily Chenoweth, Ophira Eisenberg, Allison Amend, and Aryn Kyle, the essays each shine light on the particular impact shopping has on all of us. Whether they’re cleaning out closets of loved ones, hiding a shoplifting habit, trying out extreme couponing, dividing up family possessions, or buying a brand-new car while in labor, the book’s contributors vacillate between convincing themselves to spend and struggling not to. This illuminating anthology links the effects shopping has on our emotions — whether it fills us with guilt, happiness, resentment, or doubt — our self-worth, and our relationships with parents, grandparents, lovers, children, and friends.

Czech Political Prisoners

Recovering Face

Czech Political Prisoners

Czech Political Prisoners is about the legacy of political violence under socialism in the heart of Eastern Europe. In light of reconciliation in post-socialist Czech Republic, former political prisoners' various memories reveal how the notions of time, space, and law were altered under the long-term terror of a totalitarian regime. Claiming their lost social face, political prisoners reveal their redefined subjectivities and new forms of social relations—kinship and citizenship.

Justice Performed

Courtroom TV Shows and the Theaters of Popular Law

Justice Performed

Justice Performed: Courtroom TV Shows and the Theaters of Popular Law is the first study of the reality TV genre to trace its theatrical legacy, connecting the phenomenon of the daytime TV shows to a long history of theatrical trials staged to educate audiences in pedagogies of citizenship. It examines how judge TV fulfills part of law's performative function: that of providing a participatory spectacle the public can recognize as justice. Since it debuted in 1981 with The People's Court, which made famous its star jurist, Judge Joseph A. Wapner, dozens of judges have made the move to television. Unlike the demographics in actual courts, most TV judges are non-white men and women hailing from diverse cultural and racial backgrounds. These judges charge their decisions with personal preferences and cultural innuendos, painting a very different picture of what justice looks like. Drawing on interviews with TV judges, producers and production staff, as well as the author's experience as a studio audience member, the book scrutinizes the performativity of the genre, the needs it meets and the inherent ideological biases about race, gender and civic instruction.

Confessions of a D.C. Madam

The Politics of Sex, Lies, and Blackmail

Confessions of a D.C. Madam

A firsthand account of how public officials and other well-connected individuals have been compromised or blackmailed by their sexual improprieties, Confessions of a D.C. Madame relates the author’s time running the largest gay escort service in Washington, DC, and his interactions with VIPs from government, business, and the media who solicited the escorts he employed. The book details the federal government’s pernicious campaign waged against the author to ensure his silence and how he withstood relentless, fabricated attacks by the government, which included incarceration rooted in trumped up charges and outright lies. This fascinating and shocking facet of government malfeasance reveals the integral role blackmail plays in American politics and the unbelievable lengths the government perpetrates to silence those in the know.