The Communist Party and Soviet Science

GRAHAM, L. R. The Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Communist Party, 1917
– 1932. Princeton UP, New Jersey, 1967. GREENBERG, L. L. “Soviet science
policy and the scientific establishment', Survey, vol. 17, no. 4 (81), Autumn 1971,
 ...

The Communist Party and Soviet Science


Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

D Robert A. Pape is a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of
Chicago. The Communist Party and Soviet Science by Stephen Fortescue Johns
Hopkins Press, 1987 244 pages; $28.50 reviewed by Harley Balzer Amidst the ...

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is the premier public resource on scientific and technological developments that impact global security. Founded by Manhattan Project Scientists, the Bulletin's iconic "Doomsday Clock" stimulates solutions for a safer world.

Ruling Communist Parties and Their Status Under Law

This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

Ruling Communist Parties and Their Status Under Law

This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The first part of the book analyses in detail the political & economic origins of perestroika , indispensable for understanding the basic parameters of the evolution of Russian law. In the following chapters all major legal subjects are discussed against the background of their Soviet past & as the result of the radical changes in the political, social & economic make-up of the country. The appendices include the texts of the U.S.S.R. & Russian Constitutions, the Agreement of Minsk, The Russian Federation Treaty, bibliographical sources, & extensive indices of Soviet & Russian legislation. The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, & students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc.

Soviet Science under Control

The following discussion comes from Kneen, Soviet Scientists and the State, pp.
84–6. Ibid., p. 85. Ibid., pp. 85–6. See Fortescue, “Research Institute Party
Organizations and the Right of Control', pp. 182—3 and Fortescue, The
Communist ...

Soviet Science under Control

Roberg examines the relationship between the political leadership of the Soviet Union and Soviet science. Previously, this relationship was typically characterized as one of Communist Party dominance over the sciences. He argues that the relationship between scientists and the leadership is better viewed as bi-directional. The author concludes that scientists had an influence on policy-makers in the areas of nuclear policy and human rights although not to the same degree as the Party had on science and scientists.

American Communism and Soviet Russia

This companion volume to The Roots of American Communism brings to completion what the author describes as the essence of the relationship of American Communism to Soviet Russia in the first decade after the Bolsheviks seized power.

American Communism and Soviet Russia

This companion volume to The Roots of American Communism brings to completion what the author describes as the essence of the relationship of American Communism to Soviet Russia in the first decade after the Bolsheviks seized power. The outpouring of new archive materials makes it plain that Draper's premise is direct and to the point: The communist movement "was transformed from a new expression of American radicalism to the American appendage of a Russian revolutionary power." Each generation must find this out for itself, and no better guide exists than the work of master historian Theodore Draper. American Communism and Soviet Russia is acknowledged to be the classic, authoritative history of the critical formative period of the American Communist Party. Based on confidential minutes of the top party committees, interviews with party leaders, and public records, this book carefully documents the influence of the Soviet Union on the fundamental nature of American Communism. Draper's reflections on that period in this edition are a fitting capstone to this pioneering effort. Daniel Bell, in Saturday Review, remarked about this work that "there are surprisingly few scholarly histories of individual Communist parties and even fewer which treat of this crucial decade in intimate detail. Draper's account is therefore of great importance." Arthur M. Schlesinger, in The New York Times Book Review, says that "in reading Draper's closely packed pages, one hardly knows whether to marvel more at the detachment with which he examines the Communist movement, the patience with which he unravels the dreary and intricate struggles for power among the top leaders, or the intelligence with which he analyzes the interplay of factors determining the development of American Communism." And Michael Harrington in Commonweal asserted that Draper's book "will long be a definitive source volume and analysis of the Stalinization of American Communism." Theodore Draper is the author of many books on contemporary politics and international relations. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and lives in Princeton, New Jersey. This is the third work of his to be reissued by Transaction.

The Communist Party in Post Soviet Russia

Drawing on extensive research, Luke March details the ideology, organization, and activity of a political phenomenon which has received little in-depth analysis or scholarly consensus.

The Communist Party in Post Soviet Russia

Drawing on extensive research, Luke March details the ideology, organization, and activity of a political phenomenon which has received little in-depth analysis or scholarly consensus. He analyses the Communist Party of the Russian Federation's evolution in the context of post-Soviet political developments to provide detailed and stimulating examination of a party whose role in Russian politics is far more complex and contradictory than is generally understood.

China s Communist Party

This book reveals how well the Chinese learned their lessons, as demonstrated by the regime's carefully targeted adaptations and its consequent survival."--Andrew J. Nathan, co-author of China's New Rulers

China s Communist Party

"Why has the Chinese Communist Party kept its grip on power while the former communist states of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe have collapsed? And where is China heading? In these pages, David Shambaugh provides a much-needed intellectual framework for thinking about China's recent past and future."--J. Stapleton Roy, former U.S. Ambassador to China, Indonesia, and Singapore "To understand Chinese politics, one has to understand the complex and manifold role of the Chinese Communist Party. Shambaugh's book provides this much-needed knowledge and insight." -Zbigniew Brzezinski, Center for Strategic and International Studies "Unlike deductive or speculative Western discourse on the direction of China's political change, this authoritative book scrutinizes the Chinese Communist Party on the basis of its own discourse about other party-states as well as the way it applies these lessons in rebuilding efforts. The coverage of comparative communism is a tour de force, breaking exciting new ground in explaining the important debates over the Soviet Union. The analysis of the ideological and organizational rebuilding of the Party sets the standard for future writings on Chinese politics. With convenient summaries of a wide range of views by Western scholars, this book can serve as a text that combines an overview of the field with the author's clear point of view on China's future."-Gilbert Rozman, Princeton University "David Shambaugh's innovative investigation of how China understood the fall of European communism contributes an important new dimension to our understanding of the Chinese regime's own trajectory. Shambaugh shows how the lessons China's Communist Party took from the Soviet and other collapses helped to shape their reforms, which were aimed at avoiding the fatal errors of communist regimes elsewhere. This book reveals how well the Chinese learned their lessons, as demonstrated by the regime's carefully targeted adaptations and its consequent survival."--Andrew J. Nathan, co-author of China's New Rulers

International Communism and the Communist International 1919 43

A collection of essays, using many of the newly available Russian and East European sources, to look at the history of the political phenomena of Communism.

International Communism and the Communist International  1919 43

A collection of essays, using many of the newly available Russian and East European sources, to look at the history of the political phenomena of Communism. Covers Communism in three continents and fourteen countries, addresses the role of Lenin and Stalin, and the reasons for the failure to spread revolution outside Russia.

The Private World of Soviet Scientists from Stalin to Gorbachev

Others embraced the de-Stalinization process, hoping that after Stalin's death the
Soviet Union would finally embark on the correct path. There were also scientists
who became partially disillusioned with the Communist Party after the ...

The Private World of Soviet Scientists from Stalin to Gorbachev

Rogacheva sheds new light on the complex transition of Soviet society from Stalinism into the post-Stalin era. Using the case study of Chernogolovka, one of dozens of scientific towns built in the USSR under Khrushchev, she explains what motivated scientists to participate in the Soviet project during the Cold War. Rogacheva traces the history of this scientific community from its creation in 1956 through the Brezhnev period to paint a nuanced portrait of the living conditions, political outlook, and mentality of the local scientific intelligentsia. Utilizing new archival materials and an extensive oral history project, this book argues that Soviet scientists were not merely bought off by the Soviet state, but that they bought into the idealism and social optimism of the post-Stalin regime. Many shared the regime's belief in the progressive development of Soviet society on a scientific basis, and embraced their increased autonomy, material privileges and elite status.