Serial Publication in England Before 1750

Serial Publication in England Before 1750

This 1957 text was the first thorough account of the serial publication of books in the eighteenth century. Professor Wiles shows how, first by serialization in newspapers and then by releasing instalments of a work in progress in small packets of sheets stitched in blue paper and delivered regularly to subscribers, English publishers made new and old books available to a great number of readers. It had not previously been realized how extensive the practice was. As a method of publishing it had important effects: because books could be sent out in instalments the high price of books sold was no longer a bar to the spread of literacy and useful knowledge. After explaining the growth of this method from the last years of the seventeenth century until 1750, Professor Wiles gives important chapters to related questions, such as the state of the law of copyright.

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: Volume 2, 1660-1800

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: Volume 2, 1660-1800

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 2 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Women in Early British and Irish Astronomy

Stars and Satellites

Women in Early British and Irish Astronomy

Careers in astronomy for women (as in other sciences) were a rarity in Britain and Ireland until well into the twentieth century. The book investigates the place of women in astronomy before that era, recounted in the form of biographies of about 25 women born between 1650 and 1900 who in varying capacities contributed to its progress during the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. There are some famous names among them whose biographies have been written before now, there are others who have received less than their due recognition while many more occupied inconspicuous and sometimes thankless places as assistants to male family members. All deserve to be remembered as interesting individuals in an earlier opportunity-poor age. Placed in roughly chronological order, their lives constitute a sample thread in the story of female entry into the male world of science. The book is aimed at astronomers, amateur astronomers, historians of science, and promoters of women in science, but being written in non-technical language it is intended to be of interest also to educated readers generally.